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Aug. 24, 2021

Be Like Disney: Reimagining Campus Visits w/ Dr. Tony Turner

Be Like Disney: Reimagining Campus Visits w/ Dr. Tony Turner

Disney is renowned for creating a magical experience for each and every guest. Institutions who focus on creating a unique VIP experience for individuals and families on campus visits will build a meaningful and lasting connection.

In this episode, we interview Dr. Tony Turner , Vice President of Enrollment and Marketing at Charleston Southern University , about creating a Disney experience for campus guests.

Tony talked with us about:

Treating families like people, not just one more deposit

Qualities of the Disney experience to emulate on campus visits

Building a scorecard for prospective students

Check out these related episodes:

Episode 1 w/ Ethan Braden at Purdue

Episode 2 w/ Jamie Hunt at University of Miami

Episode 22 w/ Phil Cook at Lee

To hear more interviews like this one, subscribe to Higher Ed Marketer on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or your preferred podcast platform. 

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Higher Ed Marketer in your favorite podcast player.

The Higher Ed Marketer podcast is sponsored by Caylor Solutions, an Education Marketing and Branding Agency, and by Think Patented, a Marketing Execution, Printing and Mailing provider of Higher Ed solutions.

    

 

Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:02.879 --> 00:00:07.190 You were listening to the Higher Ed Marketer, a podcast geared towards marketing professionals 2 00:00:07.230 --> 00:00:11.910 in higher education. This show will tackle all sorts of questions related to student 3 00:00:11.949 --> 00:00:16.230 recruitment, donor relations, marketing trends, new technologies and so much more. 4 00:00:16.989 --> 00:00:20.789 If you are looking for conversations centered around where the industry is going, this 5 00:00:20.989 --> 00:00:31.100 podcast is for you. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the High 6 00:00:31.140 --> 00:00:36.289 Ed Marketer podcast. I'm troy singer here with Bart Taylor, where we interview 7 00:00:36.369 --> 00:00:41.250 weekly High Ed marketers that we admire for the benefit and hopefully the betterment of 8 00:00:41.329 --> 00:00:46.649 the entire Higher Ed community. Usually we know the people that we are interviewing 9 00:00:46.729 --> 00:00:52.640 beforehand, but this next gentleman came to US recommended. His name is Dr 10 00:00:52.840 --> 00:00:57.799 Anthony Turner and he's currently the vice president of enrollment and marketing at Charleston Southern 11 00:00:57.840 --> 00:01:00.479 University. Bart, can you tell us a little bit about our guest today? 12 00:01:00.799 --> 00:01:06.390 Yeah, Tony came to US via James Steen on episode seventeen with Houston 13 00:01:06.430 --> 00:01:10.109 Baptist University. When we interviewed James he said, Hey, I think that 14 00:01:10.430 --> 00:01:12.349 I think this podcast is great, and here's some other folks that I think 15 00:01:12.349 --> 00:01:15.950 you ought to talk to and and Tony was one of them that he introduced 16 00:01:15.989 --> 00:01:19.180 us to, and Tony was in the midst of the transition. Every summer 17 00:01:19.219 --> 00:01:23.500 there's the musical chairs that starts in High Ed and you know, Tony grabbed 18 00:01:23.540 --> 00:01:29.379 his seat at southern Charleston Southern in South Carolina, and so we've had some 19 00:01:29.459 --> 00:01:32.500 pre interviews with him and one of the things I really like about Tony as 20 00:01:32.540 --> 00:01:36.250 he's very personable, he's down to Earth and I think a lot of what 21 00:01:36.370 --> 00:01:40.250 he's going to talk about. Not only is it practical and pragmatic that really 22 00:01:40.290 --> 00:01:42.290 anybody can do it any size of institution, but I really like the fact 23 00:01:42.290 --> 00:01:48.159 that he is just so authentic and and that really comes across in his personality, 24 00:01:48.519 --> 00:01:52.760 but it also comes across and how he leverages that authenticity for the marketing 25 00:01:52.840 --> 00:01:56.519 of of the institution. And so I think there's some really good points to 26 00:01:56.599 --> 00:02:01.829 take away from this particular podcast. Wonderful. Now let's bring into the conversation 27 00:02:02.430 --> 00:02:08.990 Dr Anthony Turner. Bart and I would like to welcome Dr Anthony Turner, 28 00:02:09.030 --> 00:02:15.469 Vice President of enrollment in marketing at Charleston Southern University, to the High Ed 29 00:02:15.550 --> 00:02:21.460 Marketer podcast and earlier Anthony told us that most of his friends refer to him 30 00:02:21.500 --> 00:02:24.379 ass Tony, and he gave me permission to do that too. So welcome 31 00:02:24.460 --> 00:02:29.939 to the PODCAST, Tony Hey, thanks for having me. Troy and bar 32 00:02:30.169 --> 00:02:34.009 thank you for having me here. I'm looking forward to our conversation together, 33 00:02:34.969 --> 00:02:38.770 as are we, and what we had talked about earlier I can't wait to 34 00:02:38.889 --> 00:02:43.490 share with our listeners. And if you would, Tony, give us a 35 00:02:43.530 --> 00:02:49.319 little bit about yourself and your role at Charleston southern. Sure. So, 36 00:02:49.919 --> 00:02:55.560 I recently transition to Charleston Southern and universe city, and so some people would 37 00:02:55.560 --> 00:03:00.550 say I'm wet behind the ears here at Charleston southern. So I'm still getting 38 00:03:00.590 --> 00:03:06.310 my bearings or whatnot. But when it comes to enrollment, I've been in 39 00:03:06.389 --> 00:03:12.310 the enrollment field for about twelve years. I've worked at two, actually three 40 00:03:12.310 --> 00:03:16.900 other institutions, and so one in Pennsylvania, one in Chicago, and actually 41 00:03:17.340 --> 00:03:23.180 worked at a for profit school, also in Chicago, and so there are 42 00:03:23.340 --> 00:03:28.930 distinct differences between working a for profit school and a nonprofit school, and that's 43 00:03:28.969 --> 00:03:32.689 for a different day and a different segment and time. But but I've been 44 00:03:32.729 --> 00:03:39.129 in the enrollment field ever since really early two thousands working as a missions counselor 45 00:03:39.169 --> 00:03:43.479 all the way to a vice president. So I feel like I've been in 46 00:03:43.599 --> 00:03:47.400 every single role and have a pretty good graphs of just enrollment in general. 47 00:03:47.919 --> 00:03:53.879 And then my educational background is least my doctorates in higher read, and so 48 00:03:53.599 --> 00:03:57.990 I guess you can say I have been bitten by the Higher Ed bug. 49 00:03:58.430 --> 00:04:04.110 In so it's my life and I thoroughly enjoy working in higher education. That's 50 00:04:04.110 --> 00:04:06.870 great. Thanks, Tony, for kind of that introduction and I think that 51 00:04:08.030 --> 00:04:10.419 you know, we have, we always have a pre conversation with our guests 52 00:04:10.500 --> 00:04:14.300 and I know we talked earlier just about some of the things that you drive 53 00:04:14.419 --> 00:04:15.819 that passion that you have a high ed and I think one of them that 54 00:04:16.339 --> 00:04:20.100 really stuck out to troy and I was this idea of being authentic with your 55 00:04:20.139 --> 00:04:24.100 inner actions with your future students, and I think a lot of people would, 56 00:04:24.449 --> 00:04:27.209 you know, certainly you know not their head to that pretty quickly, 57 00:04:27.329 --> 00:04:29.649 but tell us a little bit about what you mean by that, because I 58 00:04:29.689 --> 00:04:33.009 think that sometimes that's not always the case, even in our best intentions. 59 00:04:33.050 --> 00:04:38.680 Yeah, yeah, I'd love to talk about that, and so I think 60 00:04:38.920 --> 00:04:41.800 you know all of us that work in enrollment. You know, we work 61 00:04:41.879 --> 00:04:46.439 with numbers all the time and I often tell my staff, you know, 62 00:04:46.600 --> 00:04:49.560 enrollment is one of those areas where on a college campus you feel like you 63 00:04:49.680 --> 00:04:53.829 live in a fish poll. Everybody knows your business. It could be, 64 00:04:54.189 --> 00:04:57.870 you know, the president or the janitor or whoever they say. They might 65 00:04:57.949 --> 00:05:00.670 come up to you say I hear enrollments down or you know, whatever you 66 00:05:00.790 --> 00:05:04.550 want to add to that. Everybody knows Your Business and so it's easy to 67 00:05:05.189 --> 00:05:09.060 get in this mode where you feel like, well, we've got to have 68 00:05:09.180 --> 00:05:13.139 so many students and you know and follow the math and the conversion rates and 69 00:05:13.180 --> 00:05:15.939 all those numbers, and so sometimes you get in this pattern of just one 70 00:05:15.980 --> 00:05:19.660 family after another and trying to get those deposits, which are important, but 71 00:05:19.779 --> 00:05:24.970 then you kind of lose kind of that uniqueness of each family. And so 72 00:05:25.689 --> 00:05:31.329 what I hope to accomplish with with my team is that each individual student matters 73 00:05:31.529 --> 00:05:35.279 and and what I mean by that is that each student is a person. 74 00:05:35.360 --> 00:05:41.879 I'm sure all of you can remember a time, or maybe you have multiple 75 00:05:41.879 --> 00:05:46.480 experiences where when you go to a business or restaurant or somewhere fun where someone 76 00:05:46.560 --> 00:05:50.670 took particular interest in you and how that made you feel. I'm sure all 77 00:05:50.709 --> 00:05:54.550 of us have been in a place where we just feel like we're just a 78 00:05:54.629 --> 00:05:58.870 number, but when someone takes that time and is really personable with you, 79 00:05:59.550 --> 00:06:02.829 that makes you feel really special and you remember that experience in many times. 80 00:06:02.829 --> 00:06:06.579 You talk about that for many, many years and I'm sure we all have 81 00:06:06.740 --> 00:06:11.620 those unique experiences, whether it's that special cheacher that you had in high school 82 00:06:11.620 --> 00:06:15.540 or college or some personal front or whatever it is, you remember those moments. 83 00:06:15.779 --> 00:06:23.250 And so when it comes to enrollment, you have families that are different, 84 00:06:23.529 --> 00:06:28.569 you know, sizes, have different backgrounds, have different experiences, particularly 85 00:06:28.649 --> 00:06:32.279 those that are first generation families who have never embarked on this journey of a 86 00:06:32.360 --> 00:06:39.519 college search. In these families are overwhelmed, particularly today when you have college 87 00:06:39.639 --> 00:06:46.040 costs that seemed to continue to rise. There's over fourzero institutions in the US, 88 00:06:46.199 --> 00:06:49.509 all different shapes and sizes, so it's easy to be lost in that. 89 00:06:50.430 --> 00:06:55.029 And so how to use an institution stand out, and I really do 90 00:06:55.230 --> 00:07:00.110 believe that institutions really stand out when they start looking at families as as really 91 00:07:00.149 --> 00:07:04.339 as special people, in treating them in such a way that they feel like 92 00:07:04.459 --> 00:07:09.779 they're partnering with you in the process where they feel value, that they know 93 00:07:09.980 --> 00:07:12.339 that you know, you really did my best interest at heart, and not 94 00:07:12.540 --> 00:07:15.129 just looking at them as what we need, one more deposit, and so 95 00:07:15.490 --> 00:07:19.769 going the extra mile and making them feel special, because I guarantee you, 96 00:07:20.009 --> 00:07:25.209 when they're at home and they've visited four five colleges and they're at the kitchen 97 00:07:25.290 --> 00:07:28.850 table looking at the different colleges they visit, they're going to go down a 98 00:07:28.889 --> 00:07:30.360 list and when they see your school, that made me. went the extra 99 00:07:30.439 --> 00:07:33.680 mile, made them feel special, they're going to remember you say, you 100 00:07:33.720 --> 00:07:38.800 know what, that was a great experience. They really treating me as a 101 00:07:38.839 --> 00:07:42.160 person and there's a likelihood they're going to want to go with you because you 102 00:07:42.279 --> 00:07:46.029 saw them past then just a number, and being real and authentic with them, 103 00:07:46.069 --> 00:07:49.269 I think entails with that, and that one of the comment with that. 104 00:07:49.709 --> 00:07:55.430 It's also being really open and honest with them, and not saying you 105 00:07:55.509 --> 00:08:01.060 wouldn't be, but when you sit down talk about finances and and really explain 106 00:08:01.100 --> 00:08:01.779 to them, look, this is what the cause is going to be. 107 00:08:03.420 --> 00:08:05.300 You know, you might have a tenzero dollar gap and we would love for 108 00:08:05.339 --> 00:08:07.579 you to be here. How can we work through this and you have to 109 00:08:07.660 --> 00:08:11.660 be okay and say you know what, with what you're telling me, it 110 00:08:11.740 --> 00:08:16.569 might be a stretch and that's okay. Families would really appreciate you being open 111 00:08:16.649 --> 00:08:20.209 and honest with them and working with them then saying you know what, we'll 112 00:08:20.250 --> 00:08:22.649 figure it out. And then they get here, they had a bad experience 113 00:08:22.769 --> 00:08:26.160 and then they're going to feel like that you really did a bang switch on 114 00:08:26.279 --> 00:08:31.279 them, and so that's all part of being authentic with with families as you 115 00:08:31.399 --> 00:08:35.279 work with them. Tony, I really like what you said there because I 116 00:08:35.320 --> 00:08:39.399 think that that authenticity is so critical. It reminds me of a conversation we 117 00:08:39.519 --> 00:08:43.509 had in episode twenty two with Phil Cook. He's the new neck up executive 118 00:08:43.509 --> 00:08:46.509 director and was at Lee University and he really talked about, you know, 119 00:08:46.590 --> 00:08:50.950 the idea of selling that for your experience to the the future of students and 120 00:08:50.029 --> 00:08:54.940 families and the importance of that experience, and he also kind of talked about 121 00:08:54.940 --> 00:09:00.779 authenticity and talked about the idea of really making sure that you are genuine with 122 00:09:00.860 --> 00:09:03.860 them, because, I mean, he invites every family after they do the 123 00:09:03.179 --> 00:09:07.139 campus tour into his office just to kind of have a conversation with them and 124 00:09:07.179 --> 00:09:09.169 get to know them. And I think you're right. I think sometimes it's 125 00:09:09.210 --> 00:09:13.610 so easy when we're looking at numbers or feeling the heat from being in that 126 00:09:13.690 --> 00:09:18.889 fish bowl and having everybody kind of say, hey, how's enrollment? Where 127 00:09:18.889 --> 00:09:20.570 are the numbers at? You know, every week, that gets to be 128 00:09:20.610 --> 00:09:24.320 a little all but but I think being intentional, to being authentic, I 129 00:09:24.440 --> 00:09:28.840 think is a really good thing. And and are there things that that, 130 00:09:28.159 --> 00:09:31.639 as a at your level, advice president level, that you try to really 131 00:09:31.639 --> 00:09:35.360 go out of your way to make sure that happens? I mean, I'm 132 00:09:35.360 --> 00:09:37.559 not sure. Are you inviting everybody into your office or are you just making 133 00:09:37.590 --> 00:09:43.309 sure that you're around on those visit days and things like that? Usually I 134 00:09:43.549 --> 00:09:48.309 try to. So here's a perfect example. This morning we had we had 135 00:09:48.350 --> 00:09:52.590 about five guests that were that came in for visit today. I'm had a 136 00:09:52.669 --> 00:09:54.340 bunch of I had bunch of business cards and went out to the lobby. 137 00:09:54.379 --> 00:09:58.860 I said Hey, thank you for being here at CSU and I gave every 138 00:09:58.940 --> 00:10:01.100 single one of them one of my business cards. I said if you have 139 00:10:01.139 --> 00:10:05.779 any proms or issues, please let me know. And so, just being 140 00:10:05.899 --> 00:10:09.370 that personal, I'm just asking questions where you from and and asking those questions, 141 00:10:09.409 --> 00:10:13.450 even down to if they have like a little kid with them. You 142 00:10:13.529 --> 00:10:16.610 know, one of my counselors went and grabbed we have these eye patches that 143 00:10:16.730 --> 00:10:20.289 we give too because we're the buccaneers, and so we have an eye patches. 144 00:10:20.370 --> 00:10:26.000 So Hey, giving the little kid those patches and so making everybody feel 145 00:10:26.360 --> 00:10:30.440 welcome because even though that that little child is not going to enroll in college 146 00:10:30.480 --> 00:10:35.990 for a very long time, but just taking notice even in them makes the 147 00:10:35.070 --> 00:10:39.830 family feel like wow, they really are taking interest in the entire family and 148 00:10:39.029 --> 00:10:43.710 not just my son or daughter who's looking to enroll. So yeah, those 149 00:10:43.830 --> 00:10:48.389 those days. I try to get out. I still go out and recruit 150 00:10:48.909 --> 00:10:52.019 still so I will be at a fair or two Fars. Do I have 151 00:10:52.139 --> 00:10:54.059 to do? No, but I love doing it for arriety reasons, and 152 00:10:54.179 --> 00:11:00.659 so I'm still out there and I'm still recruiting. And just yesterday, I'm 153 00:11:00.659 --> 00:11:05.289 another example. I was at a restaurant with another peer of mine, one 154 00:11:05.289 --> 00:11:09.049 of the VP's, and we're describing a burger and as talking to the waitress 155 00:11:09.409 --> 00:11:13.769 just kind of sharing her story with me, and she's going back home on 156 00:11:13.970 --> 00:11:16.490 Sunday to take a gap year and I said, well, what are you 157 00:11:16.570 --> 00:11:18.120 interested in? And just start talking. I say, you know what, 158 00:11:18.320 --> 00:11:22.159 before you go home, you really should come to our school for a visit. 159 00:11:22.519 --> 00:11:24.879 Here on my business cards. While I got back to the office, 160 00:11:24.919 --> 00:11:26.000 she had emailed me and said, Hey, I really want to take up 161 00:11:26.000 --> 00:11:28.480 in an offer, and she was here at ten o'clock in the morning and 162 00:11:28.799 --> 00:11:33.830 went on at campus to her and so it's just those things that I think 163 00:11:33.870 --> 00:11:37.750 we need to take notice to be conscious of that really make a big difference. 164 00:11:37.789 --> 00:11:39.909 Yeah, yeah, I love that and I love the fact that we 165 00:11:39.990 --> 00:11:43.830 talked to so many of our guests about the idea of personalization. Than that, 166 00:11:43.950 --> 00:11:46.740 especially, everybody wants to be known, I mean especially generation Z. 167 00:11:46.899 --> 00:11:50.019 I think they really have that that kind of hardwired into them, and when 168 00:11:50.059 --> 00:11:54.139 we take the chance to be authentic and and intentional with them, I think 169 00:11:54.179 --> 00:11:58.659 that really does really pay off in big ways. So I'll go ahead and 170 00:11:58.179 --> 00:12:01.529 think troy has another question. Yes, along the lines of what we've talked 171 00:12:01.570 --> 00:12:07.970 about of being authentic. I also know that you like to create unique experiences 172 00:12:07.129 --> 00:12:13.490 when potential students come onto your campus for a visit, and you've even described 173 00:12:13.490 --> 00:12:18.879 it as creating a Disney experience. If you could described everyone what you mean 174 00:12:18.960 --> 00:12:22.759 by that. Yeah, it's great. So, you know, you hear 175 00:12:22.879 --> 00:12:26.720 the the saying that Disney is the most magical place on earth and you know, 176 00:12:26.759 --> 00:12:30.549 I think it is, until you're on the long lines waiting to get 177 00:12:30.549 --> 00:12:33.389 on a ride or something. Then you know, my opinion changes a little 178 00:12:33.429 --> 00:12:37.590 bit. But but you know, when you go there, everybody's smiling. 179 00:12:37.909 --> 00:12:43.190 You know, it doesn't matter what their job is, that there's this almost 180 00:12:43.230 --> 00:12:46.779 seems like a euphoria, almost, that they're all just really excited to be 181 00:12:46.980 --> 00:12:50.139 there. And kids, it doesn't matter what their ages are, they're just 182 00:12:50.340 --> 00:12:54.659 really excited to be there. And so Disney's done a really good job of 183 00:12:54.899 --> 00:12:58.370 just sharing with people, Hey, this is who we are, and when 184 00:12:58.409 --> 00:13:03.730 you go there you just feel the energy, in the excitement and that you 185 00:13:03.929 --> 00:13:07.370 just want to want to be there those magical moments. And I just remember 186 00:13:07.409 --> 00:13:11.889 my kids. You know, we're there, it's hot and kids start complaining. 187 00:13:11.009 --> 00:13:13.200 Then someone comes up to us, Hey, you guys, look like 188 00:13:13.480 --> 00:13:18.080 you could use some water. Just pass out bottle waters. Those little details 189 00:13:18.440 --> 00:13:22.440 to make our experience better. And so if you take that mindset of just 190 00:13:22.759 --> 00:13:28.509 you know how everyone is special and how can you look at your campus visits 191 00:13:28.149 --> 00:13:33.309 and those those events and make that unique experience for them? So I'm sure 192 00:13:33.309 --> 00:13:37.110 a lot of you have signs, you know, in your driveways, on 193 00:13:37.230 --> 00:13:39.590 your the parking lot, but if you don't, I mean that's something you 194 00:13:39.669 --> 00:13:43.379 can easily do, is like put a sign out when they get there that 195 00:13:43.460 --> 00:13:46.220 they know this is their spot and you're welcome to that and that's really easy 196 00:13:46.259 --> 00:13:48.460 to do. Many of US already have that. But even just maybe, 197 00:13:48.580 --> 00:13:52.539 just as are coming into campus, you know, having science saying hey, 198 00:13:52.620 --> 00:13:56.409 we really really appreciate you, we welcome you to campus, so they know 199 00:13:56.610 --> 00:14:00.409 that they are the VIP's coming to campus, and that's really what you want 200 00:14:00.409 --> 00:14:03.730 to create tow when they walk in. You know you might have something ready 201 00:14:03.769 --> 00:14:07.690 for them, but just so that they know that you're going above and beyond 202 00:14:07.889 --> 00:14:11.120 and that they just feel that that warmth and that's really that's really important. 203 00:14:11.120 --> 00:14:15.879 And I don't, and you might not be a fuzzy person, but everybody 204 00:14:16.399 --> 00:14:22.120 likes that, that type of feeling special, and so there's those small things 205 00:14:22.159 --> 00:14:26.470 that you can do, getting that information beforehand as much as you can, 206 00:14:26.590 --> 00:14:30.350 and it isn't to be intrusive, but just you know, small things such 207 00:14:30.389 --> 00:14:33.990 as, you know, are there certain colors you like? You know, 208 00:14:33.110 --> 00:14:37.470 and so or is there like even is there certain candy bars that you like, 209 00:14:37.620 --> 00:14:41.100 or things like that? So when they when they show up, you 210 00:14:41.179 --> 00:14:46.379 have maybe their favorite color shirt and you have a favorite candy bar or things 211 00:14:46.419 --> 00:14:50.659 like that, favorite drink, those things the really personalized the experience for them 212 00:14:52.019 --> 00:14:54.649 and those details will smaller details. They seem like a lot of work, 213 00:14:56.210 --> 00:15:01.730 but in the long run the yield is a lot higher because those families see 214 00:15:01.850 --> 00:15:05.730 that you are actually real and that you're going all out to make them feel 215 00:15:05.769 --> 00:15:11.480 feel welcome. Yeah, I think that's a great point and I remember taking 216 00:15:11.559 --> 00:15:13.919 my family to Disney for the first time, you know, ten years ago, 217 00:15:13.919 --> 00:15:16.159 and my daughter was, I guess she would have been four or five 218 00:15:16.200 --> 00:15:20.840 at the time, and so she had her princess bell dress on and we 219 00:15:20.919 --> 00:15:24.950 were going to the breakfast with the princesses in Epcot. And part of the 220 00:15:26.070 --> 00:15:28.029 strategy that Disney does, and I don't think we necessarily have to do this 221 00:15:28.110 --> 00:15:33.269 as as college is because when we have visitors, visiting families on campus, 222 00:15:33.269 --> 00:15:37.179 it's pretty easy to see the difference between a visiting family and regular students. 223 00:15:37.460 --> 00:15:41.899 But at Disney they gave us all these first visit buttons to wear with our 224 00:15:41.899 --> 00:15:46.460 lanyards and everything, and so it was very clear to just anybody that was 225 00:15:46.539 --> 00:15:48.980 a Disney cast member to be able to say that family, this is their 226 00:15:50.049 --> 00:15:52.129 first time visiting, so let's make sure we go out of our way to 227 00:15:52.250 --> 00:15:56.649 do even more. And so I remember walking across Epcott. You know, 228 00:15:56.690 --> 00:15:58.889 early in the morning nobody's there. You know a lot of the gardeners are 229 00:15:58.929 --> 00:16:03.169 outtending the gardens, and the one woman stopped and she just stood up and 230 00:16:03.250 --> 00:16:07.120 said, well, look at you, Princess, you are just gorgeous this 231 00:16:07.240 --> 00:16:11.399 morning and just kind of laid all these compliments on my daughter and she's blushing 232 00:16:11.519 --> 00:16:15.279 and and wants to spend for her and show her dress off. But that 233 00:16:15.679 --> 00:16:19.230 that gardener. It was not her job necessarily to do that. But I 234 00:16:19.350 --> 00:16:23.230 think that Disney has done such a good job of recognizing that everybody plays into 235 00:16:23.269 --> 00:16:27.029 that magical experience and I've heard a lot of people. I know Tim Fuller's 236 00:16:27.070 --> 00:16:30.110 one that often speaks to you know, it takes a campus to recruit a 237 00:16:30.149 --> 00:16:33.620 student and I think that you know, even if you have somebody, if 238 00:16:33.659 --> 00:16:37.460 it's a faculty member or if it's a if it's a gardener or a groundskeeper 239 00:16:38.179 --> 00:16:41.899 out on the on the tour route, who takes the time to just welcome 240 00:16:42.019 --> 00:16:45.500 them on campus and thank them for coming. That does say a lot and 241 00:16:45.580 --> 00:16:49.929 I think it gives that it gives that magical experience to to that people go 242 00:16:51.049 --> 00:16:53.570 home and they talk about and I think that that that idea of being authentic 243 00:16:53.649 --> 00:16:57.610 and creating those experiences for the families. I think it does make a difference 244 00:16:57.610 --> 00:17:00.639 and it doesn't take a lot of resources, but I think, to your 245 00:17:00.679 --> 00:17:04.880 point, it just takes some some thought and it takes some intentionality and it 246 00:17:06.000 --> 00:17:07.559 takes just being authentic and I think that. I think that most of the 247 00:17:07.599 --> 00:17:11.079 schools that are listening to this that's well within their reach. Something that I 248 00:17:11.279 --> 00:17:15.829 would like to add is on a project that Bart and I are working on, 249 00:17:15.390 --> 00:17:22.829 there's a mechanism where we do get information from the potential students, like 250 00:17:22.029 --> 00:17:26.349 what their favorite color is, what their favorite music to study two is and 251 00:17:26.829 --> 00:17:33.539 what their favorite snack to have when they are studying and all different types of 252 00:17:33.700 --> 00:17:37.339 things. We get that so we could put it in our outreach. What 253 00:17:37.460 --> 00:17:41.539 a good idea to utilize some of that information, like you said, for 254 00:17:41.660 --> 00:17:45.690 when they're coming into campus, having some of those things available, maybe having 255 00:17:45.730 --> 00:17:49.170 country music in a background. Again personalizing it. Bart and I do it 256 00:17:49.410 --> 00:17:56.089 from a outreached perspective. Yeah, but that's certainly information that can be utilized 257 00:17:56.410 --> 00:18:00.319 during those campus visits. So I think you've probably given Bart and I and 258 00:18:00.319 --> 00:18:04.200 nugget that we're going to take away from this. Speaking of Tony, as 259 00:18:04.240 --> 00:18:08.400 we come to a close, would love to ask you if there was another 260 00:18:08.440 --> 00:18:15.869 nugget or a tidbit, something that someone listening could take an implement right away 261 00:18:15.910 --> 00:18:21.950 and actuable item idea that you have. Yeah, so something that I've been 262 00:18:21.990 --> 00:18:26.460 working on for last couple of years. It's not a hundred percent perfect, 263 00:18:26.940 --> 00:18:32.819 but it's pretty close. Is All of us, you know, have hundreds 264 00:18:33.099 --> 00:18:37.259 and sometimes thousands of prospects and inquiries and you know the whole drill and you 265 00:18:37.380 --> 00:18:41.329 know it's easy to get all those names, work them all and and call 266 00:18:41.730 --> 00:18:45.809 and that takes up a lot of time. And haven't been in a missions 267 00:18:45.890 --> 00:18:51.890 counselor I remember those days and in the office making semi five a hundred calls 268 00:18:51.930 --> 00:18:55.410 a day and try to call through and getting a lot of nose and how 269 00:18:55.450 --> 00:18:59.960 did you get my name and all those different things, and so you know 270 00:19:00.079 --> 00:19:02.759 you're burning up a lot of time. And one of the things that I've 271 00:19:02.839 --> 00:19:07.920 done at my first institution, I started, implemented my second institution and here 272 00:19:07.319 --> 00:19:11.390 that I will be working on is is this idea of scoring. And so 273 00:19:12.309 --> 00:19:18.589 oftentimes maybe in your crum solution, whatever you use, you can start scoring 274 00:19:18.670 --> 00:19:23.109 your inquiries based upon their behavior. And so you know, for example, 275 00:19:23.700 --> 00:19:29.460 you maybe you sign an you sign a number to a person who turns an 276 00:19:29.539 --> 00:19:33.660 application. Maybe they come and visit, they click on four or five emails 277 00:19:33.740 --> 00:19:40.130 or and you would establish those parameters and based on their their interaction with your 278 00:19:40.170 --> 00:19:44.930 school, that pretty much tells me at they're really engaged person that they would 279 00:19:44.970 --> 00:19:47.529 want to move the funnel. They want to move further in the funnel. 280 00:19:47.970 --> 00:19:52.769 And so what I would I do is I put all those metrics at the 281 00:19:52.809 --> 00:19:56.519 beginning of the funnel and so once they hit a certain number that I established, 282 00:19:56.880 --> 00:20:00.319 and let's just say for the sake of our conversation it's ten. They 283 00:20:00.400 --> 00:20:04.000 hit that ten number, well then now I know that person is a qualified 284 00:20:04.359 --> 00:20:10.589 inquiry or qualified applicant and I move them along the process, and so am 285 00:20:10.630 --> 00:20:12.670 my interaction with them is a little bit more intentional because I know they're highly 286 00:20:12.710 --> 00:20:21.069 engaged versus someone maybe they click on one out of seven emails and maybe they 287 00:20:21.539 --> 00:20:25.059 submit their fast fun I'm still going to, you know, put them in 288 00:20:25.099 --> 00:20:29.259 a nurturing campaign, but I might not spend as much time with them right 289 00:20:29.339 --> 00:20:33.099 now because they're not showing that great deal of interest. And so it's a 290 00:20:33.220 --> 00:20:38.250 great way to do that to help not only your counselors prioritize who's really engage, 291 00:20:38.690 --> 00:20:44.849 but also it's a great way to really truncate your funnel and work with 292 00:20:44.890 --> 00:20:48.410 those who are highly engage and so you'll increase your yield, your yield rate. 293 00:20:48.690 --> 00:20:52.079 Why? Because you're working with people who are really interested. So it's 294 00:20:52.079 --> 00:20:56.480 kind of like the idea of if I need a hundred students ten roll, 295 00:20:57.400 --> 00:21:03.720 I could knock on tenzero doors and find a hundred students, or would you 296 00:21:03.799 --> 00:21:06.950 rather go to the street and say, you know what, all the students 297 00:21:06.990 --> 00:21:10.589 on this particular street are going to say? Yes, I'd rather do that 298 00:21:11.029 --> 00:21:15.190 and then work at Tenzero. And that's the whole idea of that scoring model 299 00:21:15.349 --> 00:21:21.180 is so each campus can identify what are those trigger points, things that you 300 00:21:21.259 --> 00:21:23.420 would score and certain activities might score a little bit higher than others, like 301 00:21:23.420 --> 00:21:27.299 a campus visit versus open up an email. But whatever that is, you 302 00:21:27.500 --> 00:21:32.579 telly that up and you would determine what that score is and that you would 303 00:21:32.579 --> 00:21:36.769 pass them on as a qualified in quire how do you want to qualify them? 304 00:21:37.250 --> 00:21:41.490 And that will lead to a higher yield rate because you're working with engaged 305 00:21:41.730 --> 00:21:45.170 people versus working with a bunch of people and you're not really sure who's engaging 306 00:21:45.210 --> 00:21:49.119 who's not engage. Thank you, Tony, and I think that's something that 307 00:21:51.079 --> 00:21:57.440 any emissions counselor or admissions department could implement based on their particular parameters, their 308 00:21:57.519 --> 00:22:03.589 experience, what happens at their school. We appreciate you sharing your time and 309 00:22:03.670 --> 00:22:06.589 your wisdom with us today. If someone would like to reach out to you, 310 00:22:07.029 --> 00:22:11.069 what would the best way for them to do so be? Yeah, 311 00:22:11.589 --> 00:22:15.059 you know, they can always email me. So my email address is a 312 00:22:15.940 --> 00:22:25.700 turner. So at you are, any are at CSU and I the EEDU, 313 00:22:26.500 --> 00:22:29.660 and so that's the best way to get ahold of me. I'm always 314 00:22:29.700 --> 00:22:33.970 checking emails and most like all enrolling people, morning, afternoon and night. 315 00:22:34.009 --> 00:22:37.849 You're checking emails. So more than like I'll get back to you a lot 316 00:22:37.890 --> 00:22:41.450 quicker on email that I wore over the phone, so that's really the best 317 00:22:41.450 --> 00:22:45.759 way to get a hold of me. Thank you, Dr Turner. Bar 318 00:22:45.920 --> 00:22:49.559 Do you have any partying words for us? Yeah, I just wanted to 319 00:22:49.599 --> 00:22:52.359 kind of just kind of point out a few things, and I kind of 320 00:22:52.400 --> 00:22:56.319 point this out because I think that we have heard this and on many of 321 00:22:56.440 --> 00:23:02.069 the episodes. I mean we've gotten nearly twenty five, twenty six episodes in 322 00:23:02.230 --> 00:23:04.950 now and but what we're hearing over and over and over again, whether it's 323 00:23:06.029 --> 00:23:10.190 Ethan Braden at produe, Jamie Hudd at University of Miami, you know, 324 00:23:10.269 --> 00:23:15.380 Phil Cook at Lee, or even today with with Tony Turner at Charleston Southern, 325 00:23:15.859 --> 00:23:21.380 this idea of being intentional on the way that we engage with prospective students 326 00:23:21.420 --> 00:23:25.220 and families, the fact that we need to be personalized, we need to 327 00:23:25.259 --> 00:23:29.089 be humans. I think that, even to the scoring conversation here at the 328 00:23:29.089 --> 00:23:32.329 very end, it's so important for us to understand that. You know, 329 00:23:32.369 --> 00:23:36.130 there are things that the computers do really well, automation, being able to 330 00:23:36.170 --> 00:23:40.490 do nurturing campaigns, follow up, keep people engaged. Those of the tasks 331 00:23:40.569 --> 00:23:44.759 and the and the tools that computers and automation are really, really well made 332 00:23:44.880 --> 00:23:48.000 for. But when we start getting into that smaller end of the funnel, 333 00:23:48.000 --> 00:23:52.039 when we're talking about the hundreds rather than the thousands or the tens of thousands, 334 00:23:52.880 --> 00:23:57.309 that's when we can really start to roll out that individualized, authentic engagement 335 00:23:57.349 --> 00:24:00.390 that's really going to make the difference with people and I think those are the 336 00:24:00.470 --> 00:24:04.470 things that especially a lot of the listening schools that are smaller or midsize, 337 00:24:04.750 --> 00:24:08.430 very similar to Charleston Southern, those are the different things it's going to set 338 00:24:08.509 --> 00:24:12.180 you apart from the other schools that are bigger, maybe the maybe the state 339 00:24:12.220 --> 00:24:17.660 or or community colleges that just cannot afford to be able to do that personalized 340 00:24:17.740 --> 00:24:19.660 touch, as well as, most of the time it's going to reflect who 341 00:24:19.660 --> 00:24:22.940 you already are, whether you're a faith based school or a private institution, 342 00:24:23.609 --> 00:24:29.609 most of the characteristics of those types of schools are already extremely personal and so 343 00:24:29.890 --> 00:24:33.529 really be able to leverage the computers and the automation to be able to do 344 00:24:33.569 --> 00:24:37.769 a lot of the things that are overwhelming for your admissions team, but then 345 00:24:37.289 --> 00:24:41.359 really sorting and parsing out the things that only people can do and the people 346 00:24:41.440 --> 00:24:45.720 do best, and so I think that a lot of what Tony's talked about 347 00:24:45.720 --> 00:24:48.839 today, from the scoring to the the authenticity and the way that the engages 348 00:24:48.880 --> 00:24:52.670 with their families to just the Disney experience, it's so important to kind of 349 00:24:52.670 --> 00:24:56.950 remember that only you and your people can do that. You can't rely on 350 00:24:56.069 --> 00:25:00.789 any programs or systems to do that. So that would be my takeaway. 351 00:25:00.789 --> 00:25:03.829 Try Well said, Bart and thank you. That brings us to the end 352 00:25:03.829 --> 00:25:07.940 of our podcast and I encourage you to reach out to any of us if 353 00:25:07.980 --> 00:25:11.700 you have a question or would just like to connect. Each week we are 354 00:25:11.740 --> 00:25:18.859 brought to you by two companies. Barts team at Klo solutions and they are 355 00:25:18.940 --> 00:25:23.609 a marketing and branding agency dealing a lot with strategy and, I think, 356 00:25:23.690 --> 00:25:29.650 patented. We are a marketing, execution, printing and mailing provider of Higher 357 00:25:29.890 --> 00:25:33.450 Ed Solutions. On behalf of Bart and I thank you so much for joining 358 00:25:33.569 --> 00:25:40.519 the podcast. You've been listening to the Higher Ed Marketer. To ensure that 359 00:25:40.640 --> 00:25:44.680 you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. 360 00:25:45.559 --> 00:25:48.799 If you're listening with apple podcasts. We'd love for you to leave a 361 00:25:48.839 --> 00:25:52.309 quick rating of the show. Simply tap the number of stars you think the 362 00:25:52.349 --> 00:25:53.869 podcast deserves. Until next time,