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April 27, 2021

Show, Don’t Tell: The Power of Video in Higher Ed Marketing

Show, Don’t Tell: The Power of Video in Higher Ed Marketing

Small to medium sized colleges, a lot of them private, all experience the challenge of trying to differentiate from public and other private schools.

This challenge makes it even more critical for colleges to align their marketing in a way that can impact the major driver of institutional revenue and growth: enrollment.

In this episode of The Higher Ed Marketer, Bart Caylor, President & Founder at Caylor Solutions Inc, and Troy Singer, Senior Account Executive at Think Patented, chat with Suzanne Petrusch, Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing at Presbyterian College about:

- How the Central Marketing Organization came about.

- The people you need on your higher ed marketing team.

- How to use video in your admissions marketing.

- How COVID changed higher ed marketing, and strategies for 2021.

Know of a higher education marketing change agent you’d like to hear on the show? Does your university have an interesting story to be featured? Connect with Bart Caylor or Troy Singer. If you’re not on LinkedIn, check the Caylor Solutions or Think Patented websites instead!

To hear more interviews like this one, subscribe to The Higher Ed Marketer on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your preferred podcast platform.
 

The Higher Ed Marketer podcast is sponsored by Caylor Solutions, an Education Marketing and Branding Agency, and by Think Patented, a Marketing Execution, Printing and Mailing provider of Higher Ed solutions.

    

 

Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:02.879 --> 00:00:07.190 You are listening to the Higher Ed Marketer, a podcast geared towards marketing professionals 2 00:00:07.230 --> 00:00:11.910 in higher education. This show will tackle all sorts of questions related to student 3 00:00:11.949 --> 00:00:16.230 recruitment, don't a relations, marketing trends, new technologies and so much more. 4 00:00:16.989 --> 00:00:20.230 If you are looking for conversations centered around where the industry is going, 5 00:00:20.750 --> 00:00:29.699 this podcast is for you. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the 6 00:00:29.780 --> 00:00:35.810 Higher Ed Marketer podcast, where, each week we explore ideas and insights with 7 00:00:36.170 --> 00:00:40.689 marketers in higher read that we admire. My name is Troye singer and I 8 00:00:40.810 --> 00:00:44.890 am one of the two hosts of this show. My cohost is Bart Kaylor, 9 00:00:44.969 --> 00:00:48.369 and Bart, I was thinking that I don't acknowledge this enough, but 10 00:00:49.009 --> 00:00:53.039 you're working with colleges and universities, with their marketing departments, every day. 11 00:00:53.119 --> 00:00:57.479 So if you would please give us a day or two in the life of 12 00:00:57.600 --> 00:01:00.280 Bart Taylor, that's happened over the past week. Oh well, thanks, 13 00:01:00.359 --> 00:01:03.950 Troy. I appreciate that and it's been a pleasure working with you on this 14 00:01:04.069 --> 00:01:08.150 podcast. I think for me this week, and I'm trying to kind of 15 00:01:08.150 --> 00:01:11.950 manage this, I end up having a lot of a lot of zoom meetings 16 00:01:11.109 --> 00:01:14.709 and I'm, I'll be honest with them, getting a little zoom fatigue. 17 00:01:14.790 --> 00:01:19.540 But it's a it's a pleasure and an honor to be able to build relationships 18 00:01:19.579 --> 00:01:22.219 of a lot of the colleges and have them just reach out and say, 19 00:01:22.219 --> 00:01:23.340 Hey, we've got this idea that we'd like to talk with you about, 20 00:01:23.420 --> 00:01:27.340 or hey, we've had some challenges with the way that we're doing something. 21 00:01:27.379 --> 00:01:33.329 I had a conversation today with a with a client that's been utilizing firm for 22 00:01:33.530 --> 00:01:37.370 for digital marketing and and we've done some digital marketing. I mean certainly we 23 00:01:37.810 --> 00:01:42.290 work with different different schools in different ways, but they were just curious about 24 00:01:42.290 --> 00:01:45.650 how we might handle something. So it's just a matter of helping and and 25 00:01:45.849 --> 00:01:49.480 kind of navigating as a partner with these different folks to just be able to 26 00:01:49.599 --> 00:01:52.480 help, you know, help them figure out the best way to do their 27 00:01:52.519 --> 00:01:56.079 own high red marketing. And sometimes that's US helping and coming alongside some of 28 00:01:56.280 --> 00:01:59.920 sometimes it's US giving some ideas of you know, hey, you got to 29 00:01:59.959 --> 00:02:01.269 look into this or look into these other things, and I think that's part 30 00:02:01.269 --> 00:02:05.430 of what we'll talk a little bit with Susanna Day about. Thanks, Bart 31 00:02:05.549 --> 00:02:07.710 and you know it's not a secret that I admire the work that you do, 32 00:02:07.830 --> 00:02:12.590 as I get to see a lot of it as I execute it with 33 00:02:12.750 --> 00:02:16.180 print mail and some of the strategy that you put forth, and I thought 34 00:02:16.219 --> 00:02:21.939 it was good to try to spotlight it. And now, as you as 35 00:02:22.020 --> 00:02:25.460 you talked about Suzanne, I'll turn the spotlight to her. Today's guest is 36 00:02:25.580 --> 00:02:30.610 Suzanne Pertruche. She's the vice president for enrollment and marketing that Presbyterian College in 37 00:02:30.650 --> 00:02:36.289 South Carolina and I know of her because of her Dayton roots. or She's 38 00:02:36.330 --> 00:02:40.530 done work here with the University of Dayton and now she's doing dynamic work at 39 00:02:40.610 --> 00:02:46.800 Presbyterian and, as Bart knows, for school is a typical school that both 40 00:02:46.800 --> 00:02:50.639 of our companies work with. So we thought it would be good to highlight 41 00:02:50.719 --> 00:02:54.000 her and have some of the people that we work with listen on how she's 42 00:02:54.039 --> 00:02:59.949 doing dynamic things at Presbyterian. That's great. I'm excited to hear the conversation. 43 00:03:00.030 --> 00:03:05.949 So let's get started. Well, let's bring Susanne in. Today's guest 44 00:03:06.150 --> 00:03:10.909 is Suzanne Pertruche, vice president for enrollment and marketing that Presbyterian College. She 45 00:03:12.110 --> 00:03:15.819 is welcomed into the hired marketing podcast. Thank you, Suzanne, for joining 46 00:03:15.900 --> 00:03:20.780 us. Thank you so much, Troy and Bart. I am very excited 47 00:03:20.900 --> 00:03:23.659 to be here with you this afternoon. The reason why I reached out to 48 00:03:23.740 --> 00:03:30.849 you is the size is Presbyterian College. It's a typical college that both barts 49 00:03:30.889 --> 00:03:35.930 organization and my organization work with and we felt it would be useful to just 50 00:03:36.009 --> 00:03:39.569 kind of look into your organization, I here it's a high functioning organization, 51 00:03:40.050 --> 00:03:46.120 and see how your current marketing department work. So if you would, if 52 00:03:46.159 --> 00:03:52.759 you could first give us a glimpse of your role and Presbyterian College. I 53 00:03:52.919 --> 00:03:58.110 came to Presbyterian College in two thousand and sixteen and for all but a month 54 00:03:58.150 --> 00:04:02.110 and a half have served as the vice president for enrollment and marketing. And 55 00:04:02.310 --> 00:04:09.629 at this institution that means the offices that are included in the portfolio are undergraduate 56 00:04:09.710 --> 00:04:15.099 admission financial aid, and we serve undergraduate as well as our graduate students in 57 00:04:15.180 --> 00:04:19.660 financial aid, and then marketing and communications. We have the central office and 58 00:04:19.740 --> 00:04:26.089 I know that today we're also going to talk about the specific enrollment marketing function. 59 00:04:26.850 --> 00:04:32.209 So PC is a very small institution. We have almost one thousandree hundred 60 00:04:32.490 --> 00:04:40.199 total students, approximately a thousand of whom are undergraduates, and so we are 61 00:04:40.639 --> 00:04:46.079 the smallest division one school with a football program in the whole country. That 62 00:04:46.279 --> 00:04:49.199 makes us stand out in a different way, but it also puts some challenges 63 00:04:49.560 --> 00:04:55.189 in front of us. We're very much focused on the liberal arts, the 64 00:04:55.350 --> 00:05:00.670 personal attention delivered by the faculty, the student experience, so all of those 65 00:05:00.750 --> 00:05:06.139 things that one would be thinking about when looking at a marketing marketing program within 66 00:05:06.220 --> 00:05:13.180 a liberal arts education, but also then raising the questions of how do we 67 00:05:13.339 --> 00:05:17.699 differentiate pc in the market place, how do we stand out to prospective students 68 00:05:17.740 --> 00:05:24.769 when we are a very small player in a market in specially in South Carolina, 69 00:05:25.129 --> 00:05:30.610 that tends to be dominated by to state flagship institutions and a number of 70 00:05:30.810 --> 00:05:33.209 regional publics? That's great. I think it's interesting. Is as kind of 71 00:05:33.250 --> 00:05:36.160 what you talked about, because I think you're right, a lot of folks 72 00:05:36.199 --> 00:05:39.800 that we know are kind of in the same place that you are, small 73 00:05:39.839 --> 00:05:42.399 to medium size college. Is a lot of them private like you are, 74 00:05:42.920 --> 00:05:46.639 and trying to differentiate not only from the publics but also differentiate from the other 75 00:05:46.720 --> 00:05:48.920 privates, I think is challenging and I kind of you know, as you 76 00:05:48.959 --> 00:05:51.629 were kind of doing that introduction. Heard you talk a little bit about this 77 00:05:51.670 --> 00:05:58.269 Central Marketing Organization and how critical it is to kind of Aligne because you're such 78 00:05:58.269 --> 00:06:00.910 a small school, how critical and necessary it becomes to align all of your 79 00:06:00.949 --> 00:06:06.899 marketing in a way that can really impact that. The major driver of institutional 80 00:06:08.100 --> 00:06:11.459 revenue and growth is enrollment. So tell us a little bit about that Central 81 00:06:11.500 --> 00:06:15.259 Marketing Organization, how it came about and how that's going. It had, 82 00:06:15.620 --> 00:06:19.850 as I understand, reported to enrollment at one point in time and went through 83 00:06:20.689 --> 00:06:27.410 a move that I would says fairly common in was situated in advancement and we 84 00:06:27.569 --> 00:06:31.329 made that shift again in two thousand and sixteen so that I would have the 85 00:06:31.449 --> 00:06:38.480 opportunity to take a look at central marketing and how it really fits within the 86 00:06:38.600 --> 00:06:43.519 context of all of the needs of the institution. With really only two primary 87 00:06:43.680 --> 00:06:47.949 sources of revenue, enrollment and fund raising, we're not the type of institution 88 00:06:48.269 --> 00:06:55.430 that has a significant number of alternative revenue streams and when I took it on 89 00:06:56.230 --> 00:07:01.500 we had four total positions in that office, one of which was empty. 90 00:07:01.899 --> 00:07:08.939 So I had three people very dedicated to the institution but trying to do a 91 00:07:09.139 --> 00:07:14.259 tremendous amount of work with not much in the way of resources, and so 92 00:07:14.779 --> 00:07:18.410 one of the big questions we had to begin to tackle was how were we 93 00:07:18.649 --> 00:07:26.730 going to expand that office's capacity at a time when we were writing a strategic 94 00:07:26.970 --> 00:07:32.639 plan and fin linding that one of the accepted pillars of the strategic plan would 95 00:07:32.639 --> 00:07:40.439 be sharing our story. So I always just cringe a little bit when I 96 00:07:40.560 --> 00:07:44.389 hear someone say this, but that idea of the best kept secret, and 97 00:07:44.550 --> 00:07:49.350 truly it hasn't mattered the size of the institution where I've been or the relative 98 00:07:49.509 --> 00:07:54.990 market position. It's always talked about in the best kept secret, and I 99 00:07:55.149 --> 00:08:00.259 recently heard a candidate for a position on campus talking about his current institution as 100 00:08:00.379 --> 00:08:03.819 the best kept secret. So, whether that was the actuality or not, 101 00:08:05.019 --> 00:08:09.980 we had to try to fight against that and in many ways that meant producing 102 00:08:09.860 --> 00:08:18.490 sufficient collateral in all forms and being able to tell stories and that would resonate 103 00:08:18.689 --> 00:08:24.850 with various audiences, from prospective students and their parents to other influencers in that 104 00:08:24.009 --> 00:08:31.319 college choice process through to current students and their parents, because we have to 105 00:08:31.480 --> 00:08:37.039 remarket the institution to them every day. We can't simply assume that they've been 106 00:08:37.080 --> 00:08:41.750 rolled and therefore they're going to have one hundred percent satisfaction. Subtle reminders of 107 00:08:41.870 --> 00:08:46.830 why they chose this institution and what it means to be part of this community 108 00:08:46.870 --> 00:08:50.990 are so important to them. But then, of course, continuing on through 109 00:08:50.110 --> 00:08:56.740 that student to alumni lifespan spectrum, making sure that we have alumni and other 110 00:08:56.899 --> 00:09:03.299 friends the institution foundations, all of which see value in supporting the type of 111 00:09:03.419 --> 00:09:09.289 work that's happening here, so that they're going to contribute to the institution financially 112 00:09:09.490 --> 00:09:15.929 and make future learning possible for students. Great and so how big is your 113 00:09:16.250 --> 00:09:18.450 team right now? He said kind of when you got there was it was 114 00:09:18.929 --> 00:09:22.450 three. Where are you at now? When I arrived it was three, 115 00:09:22.929 --> 00:09:30.039 but there were four positions. As part of the strategic plan process, the 116 00:09:30.159 --> 00:09:35.559 then president made a financial commitment to expand the size of that marketing team and 117 00:09:35.720 --> 00:09:39.870 so we actually grew by fifty percent. At are high in the Central Marketing 118 00:09:39.990 --> 00:09:46.429 Office, we had a total of six individuals working there. Now, during 119 00:09:46.509 --> 00:09:54.419 the pandemic, we were looking very carefully at cost considerations for the institution and 120 00:09:54.580 --> 00:10:01.019 so, through attrition, moved to a total of five individuals and we're currently 121 00:10:01.139 --> 00:10:03.700 in a state of flux, which we might might discuss in a little bit. 122 00:10:03.940 --> 00:10:09.289 But that's central marketing office. At its high had six individuals serving a 123 00:10:09.690 --> 00:10:18.169 variety of stakeholders on campus, with the biggest outside of our area being advancement, 124 00:10:18.370 --> 00:10:24.639 but certainly campus life, academic affairs, the President's office, everywhere you 125 00:10:24.799 --> 00:10:30.200 look on campus, and then also partnering carefully with our colleagues in athletics. 126 00:10:31.720 --> 00:10:35.110 But there's such demand in the admission office. I will also share with you 127 00:10:35.309 --> 00:10:43.110 that we have now two people who are dedicated solely to enrollment marketing and I 128 00:10:43.190 --> 00:10:46.470 would love to be able to continue that line of the conversation with you. 129 00:10:46.830 --> 00:10:50.259 Yeah, and we'll get into that. I want to clarify just a couple 130 00:10:50.299 --> 00:10:54.940 things because I know that a lot of times I have a lot of my 131 00:10:54.299 --> 00:10:56.980 clients ask me. Well, you know, hey, we're college, were 132 00:10:58.019 --> 00:11:01.220 small, we've got thirteen hundred students, we've got whatever it might be. 133 00:11:01.059 --> 00:11:03.730 What do other schools have? I mean, do they have like a graphic 134 00:11:03.769 --> 00:11:07.929 designer? Do they have a writer? What? How does that marketing team 135 00:11:07.970 --> 00:11:11.169 made up of? Are they investing in social media? People? Tell me 136 00:11:11.210 --> 00:11:13.090 about this. These five or six people that you've had plus the two additional 137 00:11:13.129 --> 00:11:16.090 ones that will get to about the pod. Okay, so if we look 138 00:11:16.129 --> 00:11:20.960 at the structure and keep it at the six, we have the executive director 139 00:11:20.159 --> 00:11:28.879 of marketing and communications and then three people reporting to that director. We've gone 140 00:11:28.919 --> 00:11:35.149 through some various iterations of this, but will focus right there for now, 141 00:11:35.309 --> 00:11:43.230 so that we have a director of digital marketing, a director of media relations 142 00:11:43.509 --> 00:11:50.019 and then a graphic designer, formally a director of creative services. The other 143 00:11:50.500 --> 00:11:56.179 two people have been situated under digital marketing so that we would have a digital 144 00:11:56.220 --> 00:12:03.529 marketing specialist whose primary responsibilities focused on social media. That can take up such 145 00:12:03.529 --> 00:12:09.009 an Andre normous amount of time and it's not just a matter of going out 146 00:12:09.009 --> 00:12:15.919 and capturing what's happening that day. It really needs to be a strategic planful 147 00:12:16.120 --> 00:12:20.120 exercise so that we have a full editorial calendar with it, but we also 148 00:12:20.240 --> 00:12:26.480 can be agile enough to be able to pick up of the moment happenings on 149 00:12:26.639 --> 00:12:31.549 campus so that we don't miss those things. So the Digital Marketing Director had 150 00:12:31.669 --> 00:12:35.389 primary oversight of the whole area, with special focus on the web, and 151 00:12:35.549 --> 00:12:41.750 then the team member working with her social media but certainly assisting with other things 152 00:12:41.870 --> 00:12:48.980 including data analytics in looking at our efficacy in all of these efforts. And 153 00:12:50.100 --> 00:12:54.500 then the director of media relations had the content writer, which was one of 154 00:12:54.539 --> 00:13:01.090 our added positions so that we could develop more stories to process quickly and to 155 00:13:01.210 --> 00:13:05.169 make sure that we were pushing those through the website and other venues. But 156 00:13:05.289 --> 00:13:11.610 you had mentioned the magazine in an earlier conversation, thinking about the types of 157 00:13:11.809 --> 00:13:16.080 indepth stories that we would want to share in the magazine as well, and 158 00:13:16.360 --> 00:13:20.879 we actually keep those two people so busy we could go with more people writing 159 00:13:22.039 --> 00:13:28.110 for the institution, and so we've been pulling in alumni writers, faculty writers 160 00:13:28.149 --> 00:13:31.789 who want to make contributions. It's really one of those opportunities that we want 161 00:13:31.789 --> 00:13:37.070 to harness the talents of others so that we can continue to tell those stories 162 00:13:37.190 --> 00:13:41.429 of the institution. Thank you for sharing that because I, like I said, 163 00:13:41.460 --> 00:13:45.139 I think that sometimes there's people who say, well, I guess we 164 00:13:45.220 --> 00:13:46.659 need a Web master, we need a graphic designer, we need a rider, 165 00:13:46.740 --> 00:13:48.700 we need a video person, we need I mean, they can go 166 00:13:48.899 --> 00:13:52.740 through and segment every piece of digital marketing, every piece of regular marketing, 167 00:13:52.779 --> 00:13:56.690 and feel like I can't do that because I don't have a dedicated person, 168 00:13:56.730 --> 00:14:00.769 but it sounds like a lot of a lot of the philosophy at pc is 169 00:14:00.809 --> 00:14:01.690 to be a little bit more of you know, we wear a lot of 170 00:14:01.730 --> 00:14:07.289 different hats. We take responsibilities for what we're doing and we lean into what 171 00:14:07.450 --> 00:14:09.759 we're doing as opposed to, you know, trying to be just so specialized 172 00:14:09.799 --> 00:14:13.240 that we can't reach across the island help out. I think that's a fair 173 00:14:13.320 --> 00:14:16.919 characterization. Yes, great, wait, we talked a little bit. You 174 00:14:18.080 --> 00:14:20.320 kind of we're talking that you wanted to talk a little bit more about this 175 00:14:20.519 --> 00:14:24.789 embedded group within your admissions team and I understand that you're kind of calling that 176 00:14:24.870 --> 00:14:26.750 the satellite marketing pod. Tell us a little bit about that. Well, 177 00:14:26.990 --> 00:14:33.789 it really came out of my own experience at other institutions and I think I've 178 00:14:33.870 --> 00:14:41.820 been pretty fortunate to always have a dedicated enrollment marketing team and in fact that 179 00:14:43.019 --> 00:14:48.059 was my own pathway. While I started as an admission counselor and moved up 180 00:14:48.100 --> 00:14:52.179 through several levels, I didn't become a director of admission. I became a 181 00:14:52.299 --> 00:14:56.090 director of and the term used at the time was operations, but it really 182 00:14:56.409 --> 00:15:03.090 encompassed marketing and a all of the related areas and so it sits very close 183 00:15:03.169 --> 00:15:07.159 to my heart and my own interest and I was able to use that to 184 00:15:07.320 --> 00:15:13.879 propel myself into other leadership roles than so I love the area. It really 185 00:15:15.080 --> 00:15:20.360 builds everything together for me. But in coming to Presbyterian College, I was 186 00:15:20.679 --> 00:15:26.870 watching what people in the admission team were actually doing and what their strengths were, 187 00:15:26.470 --> 00:15:31.909 and so someone who was with us was titled As an Associate Director of 188 00:15:31.950 --> 00:15:39.899 admission, studied at Presbyterian College, had a degree in English, was tremendously 189 00:15:39.860 --> 00:15:45.580 gifted and creative in the area of writing, and so he was doing a 190 00:15:45.820 --> 00:15:50.409 large part of this. I thought let's recognize that in a specific way. 191 00:15:50.610 --> 00:15:56.169 We don't have to stay with this title of Associate Director of admission. He 192 00:15:56.289 --> 00:16:03.009 has an opportunity for advancement by being given a director title and let's make sure 193 00:16:03.009 --> 00:16:10.039 that we're really drawing attention to the the skill set and knowledge base that he 194 00:16:10.080 --> 00:16:15.080 has with enrollment marketing. So he was the first person already physically embedded in 195 00:16:15.159 --> 00:16:18.870 the office of admission, having been a member of the team for a long 196 00:16:18.909 --> 00:16:25.509 time. So understanding the daily work and where some of the challenges are and 197 00:16:25.830 --> 00:16:33.820 opportunities and working with prospective students and their families and and counselors and other audiences, 198 00:16:33.899 --> 00:16:40.019 and the volume of work was increasing significantly and if you'd like, I 199 00:16:40.059 --> 00:16:42.659 can touch on why. That was the point where he said to me the 200 00:16:42.740 --> 00:16:48.690 other year really need another team member. I could use a graphic designer, 201 00:16:48.929 --> 00:16:52.370 and so we were able to fight for and add that position. But in 202 00:16:52.610 --> 00:16:59.490 hindsight that title was very limited and knowing what I know now, I would 203 00:16:59.490 --> 00:17:04.440 have started with a title along the lines of assistant director of enrollment marketing rather 204 00:17:04.480 --> 00:17:12.319 than graphic designer. That doesn't begin to really cover what this person's responsibilities are 205 00:17:12.440 --> 00:17:17.029 within the yeah. And and what are some of those responsibilities? Because, 206 00:17:17.029 --> 00:17:19.710 I mean, I know that you've talked about in our earlier conversations using video 207 00:17:19.910 --> 00:17:22.750 for a lot of outreach during the pandemic, but is that? Is that 208 00:17:22.829 --> 00:17:27.750 kind of what kind of came out of those those two embedded folks, they 209 00:17:29.029 --> 00:17:33.259 working together, have done a lot of the video and I will tell you 210 00:17:33.500 --> 00:17:40.740 that that is not their background. So someone in our central marketing team did 211 00:17:40.900 --> 00:17:45.970 study at the undergraduate and graduate levels video production and we have been able to 212 00:17:47.250 --> 00:17:52.009 use his skills for all types of other videos on campus. But in the 213 00:17:52.089 --> 00:18:00.839 admission video world. We have partnered with a local provider in order to help 214 00:18:00.000 --> 00:18:07.559 us capture footage on campus and edit it with a somewhat tongue in cheek view 215 00:18:07.799 --> 00:18:15.150 in many cases of the admission process. So we are the Blue Hose, 216 00:18:15.549 --> 00:18:18.069 and I didn't mention that when I was telling you a little bit about pc, 217 00:18:18.829 --> 00:18:23.509 but it is then the name by which our athletics teams are known, 218 00:18:25.029 --> 00:18:30.180 and we have appropriated that to include all students at the institution so that, 219 00:18:30.220 --> 00:18:37.980 as we're describing that traditional liberal arts environment, what's this memorable piece that we 220 00:18:37.099 --> 00:18:44.329 can use and actually extrapolate from there what it means to see yourself on a 221 00:18:44.490 --> 00:18:48.490 path that might be different than what most of your friends are going to be 222 00:18:48.650 --> 00:18:53.210 doing in the next year. And we also know that the admission process is 223 00:18:53.490 --> 00:18:59.319 highly stressful. So if we can have some fun during this still taking care 224 00:18:59.400 --> 00:19:03.680 of making sure they know the key points of how they'll benefit from coming to 225 00:19:03.839 --> 00:19:08.640 this institution, but to make it fun and enjoyable and to provide an experience 226 00:19:08.799 --> 00:19:12.349 that's going to be memorable, we want to do that and so we've tried 227 00:19:12.430 --> 00:19:17.750 to make that flow into the video as well. Through much of the editing, 228 00:19:18.349 --> 00:19:22.869 scriptwriting, etc. So it's a combination of the talents of those two 229 00:19:22.950 --> 00:19:30.299 people in the admission office working with the actual video skills of our local provider. 230 00:19:30.980 --> 00:19:33.339 That's great. I love how that partnership works out and I that's something 231 00:19:33.380 --> 00:19:37.299 that we talked a lot about on some of the blogs and things. So 232 00:19:37.380 --> 00:19:40.170 that's that's really good and I really appreciate the the inside and all that. 233 00:19:40.250 --> 00:19:42.890 I think it's some I think it's interesting to that your videos have been what 234 00:19:44.009 --> 00:19:47.170 I kind of Colin, you know, term edutainment. I think that, 235 00:19:47.329 --> 00:19:49.529 you know, generation Z, they want to be entertained as much as they 236 00:19:49.569 --> 00:19:52.799 want to be learning and educating. I think that's one of the reasons why 237 00:19:52.920 --> 00:19:56.960 Youtube is such a popular channel for for that particular generation, and so I 238 00:19:57.119 --> 00:20:02.240 love the fact that you've leaned into that and made made some of those admissions. 239 00:20:02.880 --> 00:20:04.960 You know, process videos more, a little bit more tongue and cheek 240 00:20:04.960 --> 00:20:08.990 and Educat, you know, entertaining, rather than just making them all this 241 00:20:10.109 --> 00:20:11.230 is the process, this is how it's going to be, because that's going 242 00:20:11.309 --> 00:20:15.190 to that's going to differentiate you by adding a little bit of that entertainment and 243 00:20:15.269 --> 00:20:18.710 from what I understand from my focus group before. You know, students at 244 00:20:18.789 --> 00:20:22.420 home, my children to in college now and to still in high school, 245 00:20:23.019 --> 00:20:27.180 they really want to be. They notice and they pay attention to those schools 246 00:20:27.180 --> 00:20:30.099 that are entertaining them as much as they're educating them. So I appreciate you 247 00:20:30.180 --> 00:20:33.700 saying that. So try. I know you had a couple questions you wanted 248 00:20:33.700 --> 00:20:36.049 to kind of dig into. Yes, and it was along the line of 249 00:20:36.089 --> 00:20:38.329 the video. I know that they leaned into it this year and I think 250 00:20:38.369 --> 00:20:42.369 one of the reasons why is because of COVID. So we'd like to know 251 00:20:42.369 --> 00:20:45.970 if you could describe how that is made a difference in a way that you 252 00:20:47.130 --> 00:20:52.480 promote the school and do you see some of those changes lasting even after you're 253 00:20:52.480 --> 00:20:56.799 able to bring prospective students back on campus? So one of the videos that 254 00:20:57.279 --> 00:21:03.119 we had created before we went through the big change at this time last year 255 00:21:03.349 --> 00:21:07.950 and having to be remote, not only in how education was delivered on campus 256 00:21:08.109 --> 00:21:14.549 but and how we interacted with prospective students and families, was an offshoot of 257 00:21:14.630 --> 00:21:21.140 the old MTV cribs, and so we have pcing cribs and it's funny because 258 00:21:21.180 --> 00:21:26.819 you can really feel now the timeline for the original show, from which we 259 00:21:26.019 --> 00:21:33.490 so liberally borrowed, because sometimes I'll hear our admission counselors asking are visiting students 260 00:21:33.529 --> 00:21:37.730 if they're familiar with MTV CRIBS and they're not. The parents like, they're 261 00:21:37.809 --> 00:21:47.279 not there like. But the student we featured has such tremendous energy and he 262 00:21:47.440 --> 00:21:52.920 in fact recently was a contestant on American idol, so you can imagine the 263 00:21:52.000 --> 00:21:59.920 kind of entertainer that I'm talking about. He did an incredible job and that 264 00:21:59.960 --> 00:22:04.549 actually was able to be repurposed because, of course, at this time last 265 00:22:04.549 --> 00:22:11.910 year we weren't having on campus visits. We reopened for visits in late August, 266 00:22:11.109 --> 00:22:17.180 early September, but we are limited in what we show. So it's 267 00:22:17.220 --> 00:22:21.819 not the visit of old where they're going in all of the key academic buildings 268 00:22:21.940 --> 00:22:26.980 and the dining facilities and the residence halls. We in fact don't take students 269 00:22:26.019 --> 00:22:32.049 in any residence halls right now. We want to be particularly respectful of those 270 00:22:32.170 --> 00:22:36.970 students who are living on campus and their health and safety. So as part 271 00:22:37.009 --> 00:22:41.730 of our admission presentation we show this video and it allows people, in a 272 00:22:41.930 --> 00:22:47.559 fun way, to have a glimpse inside some of the residence halls, whether 273 00:22:47.640 --> 00:22:51.960 it's a facility they might live in right away or something they wouldn't experience, 274 00:22:52.039 --> 00:22:56.720 such as our newest buildings, our apartments, until there are perhaps in their 275 00:22:56.759 --> 00:23:00.750 junior or senior year at the institution. So we don't have to cover as 276 00:23:00.750 --> 00:23:07.549 much physical ground and we can also maintain covid protocol when we show that. 277 00:23:07.309 --> 00:23:14.619 But certainly there have been other videos and we intentionally drive students to videos through 278 00:23:14.660 --> 00:23:19.140 other types of communication so that we're really looking at this layered approach and will 279 00:23:19.220 --> 00:23:26.900 soon be launching a new platform that will allow us in fact track who's viewing 280 00:23:26.289 --> 00:23:32.930 the video, so we'll have an opportunity to understand more about the students viewing 281 00:23:33.049 --> 00:23:37.930 habits, what things are resonating, how that informs future production. But perhaps 282 00:23:38.130 --> 00:23:45.559 more importantly, how can our admission counselors take that information and of course not 283 00:23:45.720 --> 00:23:49.400 say to somebody, well, I know you watched whichever video five time. 284 00:23:49.680 --> 00:23:53.400 Little creepy, a little creepy? Yes, too much big brother, but 285 00:23:53.960 --> 00:23:59.430 how can they take that information and begin to shape their conversation with their student 286 00:23:59.950 --> 00:24:03.750 about what they know that students interest or points of concern might be? And 287 00:24:03.910 --> 00:24:10.339 we do that certainly with other things are digital stats. What are students doing 288 00:24:10.460 --> 00:24:12.859 on our website? How long are they staying? How often are they visiting 289 00:24:12.980 --> 00:24:18.740 certain pages? So it all goes to further inform the conversation and to hopefully 290 00:24:18.859 --> 00:24:26.450 make those conversations a much tighter part of that relationship building process that ultimately results 291 00:24:26.529 --> 00:24:30.529 in having a student come to PC as a future blue host. I love 292 00:24:30.650 --> 00:24:34.890 that and I love the fact that you are leaning into those analytics and and 293 00:24:36.970 --> 00:24:38.519 and I love the fact that you're telling us all of this because again, 294 00:24:38.519 --> 00:24:41.720 it goes back to you know, a lot of the folks that I work 295 00:24:41.720 --> 00:24:45.799 with are small schools like yours, almost identical, and the demographics as far 296 00:24:45.839 --> 00:24:49.000 as the size and you under two thousand type and so many times I think 297 00:24:49.000 --> 00:24:52.950 it's like, oh, we're so small, we're not a state university, 298 00:24:52.029 --> 00:24:55.509 we don't have a big department. But I love the fact that you are. 299 00:24:56.109 --> 00:24:57.789 You know, you're still doing a lot of really good things. I 300 00:24:57.829 --> 00:25:02.710 mean use utilize in the video, utilizing the statistics, analyzing what's going on. 301 00:25:03.349 --> 00:25:04.309 You're doing a lot of smart marketing and that's a lot of what I 302 00:25:04.390 --> 00:25:07.700 try to encourage folks is to look at how you can be smarter with what 303 00:25:07.740 --> 00:25:11.019 you're doing. Yes, we all have a limited budgets. Yes, we 304 00:25:11.099 --> 00:25:14.180 would all love to get to where we think we need to be, but 305 00:25:14.259 --> 00:25:15.779 what can you do with what you have? And so I think you know, 306 00:25:15.940 --> 00:25:18.980 plaud you and your team for for doing that and doing that well. 307 00:25:19.019 --> 00:25:26.289 So so tell me a little bit about you know where where you think it's 308 00:25:26.289 --> 00:25:30.049 going to go soon and and what your plans are here for kind of the 309 00:25:30.089 --> 00:25:33.450 next year or so. Well, I appreciate, first you mentioning that team 310 00:25:33.529 --> 00:25:38.599 and I want to use this opportunity to thank them because I think that's a 311 00:25:38.680 --> 00:25:45.000 big part of the success that we have and I could not sit in a 312 00:25:45.039 --> 00:25:49.230 room alone and do this without the people I'm fortunate to work with. And 313 00:25:49.390 --> 00:25:53.869 so part of this process is making sure that we build trust so that when 314 00:25:53.910 --> 00:25:59.390 they get some creative ideas and want to take some risks, I can give 315 00:25:59.430 --> 00:26:03.670 them the freedom to do that and to have a very good sense of what 316 00:26:03.869 --> 00:26:07.420 those results are going to be. So I think we need to continue to 317 00:26:08.259 --> 00:26:15.579 be risk takers and COVID has probably changed things permanently. We've been fortunate to 318 00:26:15.619 --> 00:26:19.569 be in an environment where we could invite guests to campus again, but, 319 00:26:19.690 --> 00:26:25.930 as I mentioned, they're not experiencing everything that they would have. Before the 320 00:26:26.049 --> 00:26:33.599 pandemic we were in a great place to be able to very quickly offer online 321 00:26:33.640 --> 00:26:38.759 programming for students, from our own information sessions to participating in college fairs and 322 00:26:38.920 --> 00:26:45.279 high school visits to one on one appointments. We still offer some of those 323 00:26:45.319 --> 00:26:52.630 virtual opportunities, but for for our type of institution, we feel strongly that 324 00:26:52.789 --> 00:26:57.549 the inperson piece works better and we hope that we'll be able to return to 325 00:26:57.710 --> 00:27:03.900 that. But I think that in many ways, as institutions have cut travel 326 00:27:03.099 --> 00:27:08.940 budgets and looked at whether or not the big college fairs will return, we're 327 00:27:08.980 --> 00:27:15.970 going to have a blend probably going forward between that in person experience and the 328 00:27:17.130 --> 00:27:22.410 delivery of virtual experiences for students and we need to find the best ways to 329 00:27:22.569 --> 00:27:29.650 allow them to consume information at their own time. So even before the pandemic 330 00:27:30.039 --> 00:27:34.200 we wanted to have not just a virtual tour but a self guided tour. 331 00:27:34.839 --> 00:27:38.079 I think the next piece of that you'll see is people who are able to 332 00:27:38.200 --> 00:27:44.910 do that with virtual reality goggles. And how does that augment the tour and 333 00:27:45.109 --> 00:27:49.789 make it richer so to the extent that we can focus our limited resources on 334 00:27:51.029 --> 00:27:56.069 things that are going to tell a richer story to those students. That's how 335 00:27:56.269 --> 00:28:03.339 will prioritize our personnel and financial resources. That's great. That's great, Suzanne. 336 00:28:03.420 --> 00:28:07.180 Thank you so much for giving us such an in depth and sincere look 337 00:28:07.259 --> 00:28:11.259 into what you're doing and as parts set all along, I think it's going 338 00:28:11.299 --> 00:28:14.369 to be helpful for a lot of our listeners who are wondering are we doing 339 00:28:14.490 --> 00:28:18.609 things like others are, or even creating ideas of some of the things that 340 00:28:18.730 --> 00:28:22.690 they can look into and implement. And along that line, we end every 341 00:28:22.730 --> 00:28:26.440 episode of our podcast by asking our guests is there a new idea or something 342 00:28:26.480 --> 00:28:32.400 intriguing either you're doing or something yet you recently read that you would like to 343 00:28:32.480 --> 00:28:36.480 share? That might be helpful as for others to implement here in the next 344 00:28:36.519 --> 00:28:44.549 thirty to sixty days? Well, thirty sixty days makes it challenging. I 345 00:28:45.670 --> 00:28:56.099 have seen so many types, types of marketing tactics being looked at. For 346 00:28:56.420 --> 00:29:02.940 me, I wanted to get a much better understanding of how others are perceiving 347 00:29:03.019 --> 00:29:07.099 our brandon instead of just looking at the aspects of social media, we can 348 00:29:07.220 --> 00:29:14.450 see engaging with a partner for true social listening. I think that that piece 349 00:29:14.529 --> 00:29:19.769 might be something that schools could look at in a short time frame to determine 350 00:29:21.569 --> 00:29:26.599 how those conversations are taking place, what the depth is and to identify the 351 00:29:26.599 --> 00:29:33.119 types of holes they may be missing through their current capabilities, to at least 352 00:29:33.119 --> 00:29:37.480 ask the question, is it worth investing with a partner to be able to 353 00:29:37.589 --> 00:29:45.109 have a much bigger picture of where we are as an institution in terms of 354 00:29:45.670 --> 00:29:48.789 our social presence? So that that would be one thing that would come to 355 00:29:48.910 --> 00:29:55.180 mind. It's something that we're engaged in now and I'm anxiously awaiting the results. 356 00:29:55.460 --> 00:29:56.660 Yeah, and I just want to add to for the listeners. Is 357 00:29:56.700 --> 00:30:00.420 that Susan you're talking about kind of these platforms. He's listening platforms, which 358 00:30:00.420 --> 00:30:03.619 I think are great, even as a short term, and you might already 359 00:30:03.619 --> 00:30:07.730 be doing the Suzanne's just going to google and doing some Google alerts. So 360 00:30:07.849 --> 00:30:11.529 anytime there's a mention of your name, the school's name, you know, 361 00:30:11.609 --> 00:30:15.410 anything that has to do with the school, you can put in a something 362 00:30:15.450 --> 00:30:18.329 in Google that says anytime somebody mentions this sends send us an email, and 363 00:30:18.769 --> 00:30:22.000 that's a really good way to at least be able to be aware of what's 364 00:30:22.039 --> 00:30:26.440 being said online about your institution. In a way that is is better than 365 00:30:26.480 --> 00:30:30.319 being blind, and so, Suzanne, thank you for mentioning that. Oh, 366 00:30:30.359 --> 00:30:34.680 you're welcome. I appreciate the question and wish we had many more hours 367 00:30:34.750 --> 00:30:40.549 to continue to throw those thoughts together, because the world of technology, I 368 00:30:40.670 --> 00:30:45.549 think, presents us with limitless opportunities. Yes, that will be careful what 369 00:30:45.670 --> 00:30:48.349 you ask for, Susanne, because Bart and I plan to do this podcast 370 00:30:48.470 --> 00:30:52.980 for a long time, so we may be inviting you back for a second 371 00:30:52.019 --> 00:30:56.579 and third conversation, but we do really appreciate your time that you gave us 372 00:30:56.579 --> 00:31:02.940 today. You mentioned cool videos and a lot of other things. If someone 373 00:31:03.059 --> 00:31:07.650 wanted to reach you to get an indepth look at what you're doing, especially 374 00:31:07.730 --> 00:31:11.849 those videos, if they are up there public, how would the best way 375 00:31:11.890 --> 00:31:15.089 for them to reach you be? Well, somebody wanted to reach out to 376 00:31:15.210 --> 00:31:22.039 me, I would say that email would probably be the easiest opportunity, and 377 00:31:22.200 --> 00:31:26.400 my email address is the first initial of my first name and my full last 378 00:31:26.440 --> 00:31:33.710 name, so it's S P e T. Are you, Sch at Presby 379 00:31:34.470 --> 00:31:41.670 prees by Dot Edu. I'm available on Linkedin. They certainly are welcome to 380 00:31:41.750 --> 00:31:45.549 find my information on the school's website and if they want to see some of 381 00:31:45.630 --> 00:31:52.619 those videos, beyond the blue dot org is our admission micro site. Perfect. 382 00:31:53.019 --> 00:31:56.380 Thanks, against Suzanne. We appreciate you off in your time in wisdom 383 00:31:56.539 --> 00:32:00.609 so we may share it with others. And, as I end every podcast, 384 00:32:00.849 --> 00:32:06.970 with our commercial. The High Ed marketer is sponsored by Taylor solutions and 385 00:32:07.170 --> 00:32:12.690 education marketing and branding agency and by Think, patented, a marketing, execution, 386 00:32:13.049 --> 00:32:16.359 printing and, mainly provider of high it solutions. On behalf of Bart 387 00:32:16.440 --> 00:32:22.039 and, I thank you for joining us in your continued support of the podcast. 388 00:32:23.480 --> 00:32:28.039 You've been listening to the Higher Ed Marketer. To ensure that you never 389 00:32:28.119 --> 00:32:31.750 miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If 390 00:32:31.789 --> 00:32:36.430 you're listening with apple PODCASTS, we'd love for you to leave a quick rating 391 00:32:36.470 --> 00:32:39.390 of the show. Simply tap the number of stars you think the podcast deserves. 392 00:32:40.109 --> 00:32:40.950 Until next time,