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April 19, 2022

One-of-a-Kind: Marketing the Uniqueness of Your School

One-of-a-Kind: Marketing the Uniqueness of Your School

What sets your school apart from others? 

It’s a useful thing to know. 

You can devise a powerful marketing strategy if you embrace what makes you unique and use it to attract prospective students. 

In this episode, Lindsay Nyquist, Director of Marketing and Communications at Fort Lewis College, joins the show to talk about recognizing and marketing the uniqueness of your school. 

We discuss:

  • The experience of being featured in the first episode of The College Tour
  • Strategies for ensuring you authentically reflect the makeup of your student body
  • How to develop and refine a consistent school brand 

Mentioned during the podcast:

To hear more interviews like this one, subscribe to Higher Ed Marketer on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your preferred podcast platform.  

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The Higher Ed Marketer podcast is sponsored by Caylor Solutions, an Education Marketing and Branding Agency, and by Think Patented, a Marketing Execution, Printing and Mailing provider of Higher Ed solutions.

    

 

Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:02.919 --> 00:00:07.240 You were listening to the Higher Ed Marketer, a podcast geared towards marketing professionals 2 00:00:07.280 --> 00:00:11.960 in higher education. This show will tackle all sorts of questions related to student 3 00:00:12.000 --> 00:00:16.800 recruitment, don'tor relations, marketing trends, new technologies and so much more. 4 00:00:17.079 --> 00:00:21.000 If you are looking for conversation centered around where the industry is going, this 5 00:00:21.039 --> 00:00:29.359 podcast is for you. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the high 6 00:00:29.399 --> 00:00:33.280 end marketer podcast. My name is troy singer and I'm here with my cohost, 7 00:00:33.399 --> 00:00:37.880 Barb Kaylor. Today on the show we interview Lindsay Nyquist. She's a 8 00:00:37.880 --> 00:00:43.600 director of Marketing Communications for Fort Louis College in Durango, Colorado, and this 9 00:00:43.679 --> 00:00:49.200 episode is all about how to market the uniqueness of your school, in Fort 10 00:00:49.280 --> 00:00:54.439 Lewis College, as a very unique college in rural Colorado. Yeah, it's 11 00:00:54.600 --> 00:00:58.200 it's a great episode. We kind of get started. We met Lindsay through 12 00:00:58.240 --> 00:01:00.840 they were the inaugural episode of the College Tour and you know, on episode 13 00:01:00.840 --> 00:01:04.840 forty seven we interviewed Alex Boylan, the producer and host of the college tour, 14 00:01:04.879 --> 00:01:07.359 and so we kind of get started on that, but we also kind 15 00:01:07.400 --> 00:01:11.280 of get into the whole idea of you know, Fort Lewis is a very 16 00:01:11.359 --> 00:01:15.920 unique school. It's a public liberal arts school. It's in rural Durango Colorado, 17 00:01:15.959 --> 00:01:19.480 in the middle of the ski mountains, and fifty nine percent of their 18 00:01:19.480 --> 00:01:25.079 student population are students of color and come from various backgrounds, including native American, 19 00:01:25.120 --> 00:01:27.599 and so I think it's a very interesting conversation. She kind of walks 20 00:01:27.599 --> 00:01:33.079 through a number of things. So I think you're in store for a great 21 00:01:33.120 --> 00:01:40.519 a great podcast. I agree. Here's Lindsay Nyquist. It's our pleasure to 22 00:01:40.560 --> 00:01:46.120 welcome Lindsay Nyquist, director of marketing and Communications for Fort Louis College in Colorado, 23 00:01:46.159 --> 00:01:49.640 to the high rid marketer podcast and before we get into our conversation of 24 00:01:49.719 --> 00:01:53.920 how to market, the uniqueness of your school, and you'll see that Fort 25 00:01:55.000 --> 00:01:59.480 Lewis is a very unique college in Colorado. If you could tell us, 26 00:01:59.560 --> 00:02:05.439 Lindsay a little bit about the school and the makeup of it population, what 27 00:02:05.680 --> 00:02:09.879 village it's in. Very unique school, absolutely so. We are a technically 28 00:02:10.120 --> 00:02:15.919 Colorado's public level arts college. We have about thirty five hundred students but again, 29 00:02:15.080 --> 00:02:17.719 speaking to the uniqueness of it, of more than fifty percent of our 30 00:02:17.759 --> 00:02:23.120 students or students of color, around fifty nine percent, and a large proportion 31 00:02:23.159 --> 00:02:28.120 of those are students from native American or Alaska native backgrounds. And I would 32 00:02:28.120 --> 00:02:32.439 also say just our location in Beautiful Durango Colorado is a big part of who 33 00:02:32.479 --> 00:02:38.840 we are and the way that we address education, both by being really connected 34 00:02:38.000 --> 00:02:43.400 to the place where we are in an academic way and in a student life 35 00:02:43.400 --> 00:02:46.400 way. So yeah, I would say that's how we stand apart. I 36 00:02:46.439 --> 00:02:52.960 first got was familiarized with the school through the show the college tour, and 37 00:02:53.039 --> 00:02:58.960 in your episode it's very evident it's a school where your students are outdoors a 38 00:02:58.960 --> 00:03:01.960 lot. Absolutely, and you know that that takes many different forms. That 39 00:03:02.000 --> 00:03:06.840 can as I mentioned before, that could be an archeology field school, or 40 00:03:06.879 --> 00:03:09.919 it can be students in our adventure ED program who are out there leading trips 41 00:03:10.039 --> 00:03:14.759 with first years. It can be students who just like to go out and 42 00:03:14.800 --> 00:03:19.840 ski on the weekends, which is very popular with our first year free pass 43 00:03:19.879 --> 00:03:23.439 to our locals here resorts. So yes, very much. The core of 44 00:03:23.439 --> 00:03:27.039 who we are is that connection to place. That is a very cool perk, 45 00:03:27.159 --> 00:03:30.879 especially for the winter time like it is again, Lindsay, we were 46 00:03:30.919 --> 00:03:35.759 first introduced to you through the college tour. In our conversations with you were 47 00:03:35.800 --> 00:03:39.240 around that experience. So I know that you were one of the first, 48 00:03:39.280 --> 00:03:44.919 if not the first, episode or school that they approach. If we can, 49 00:03:44.960 --> 00:03:47.719 if you can, give us a sense of how that opportunity came to 50 00:03:47.800 --> 00:03:53.919 you and the decisionmaking process of you saying yes, this is something that we 51 00:03:53.960 --> 00:03:57.840 would like to take on, because I don't think anyone else has said yes 52 00:03:57.879 --> 00:04:01.800 to them until you did. Absolutely yes, we were episode one, season 53 00:04:01.840 --> 00:04:05.199 one of the college tour and we're really proud of that. It really came 54 00:04:05.360 --> 00:04:09.800 from you know, I'm sure anyone who is in a position similar to mine 55 00:04:09.879 --> 00:04:14.240 knows that you get cold calls from vendors many times a day. So sometimes 56 00:04:14.280 --> 00:04:15.680 it's really hard to sift through and find out what's going to be a good 57 00:04:15.680 --> 00:04:19.319 fit for your school and ways to reach your students. And when that one 58 00:04:19.399 --> 00:04:23.560 came to us, we were really in the in the early stages of the 59 00:04:23.600 --> 00:04:27.399 pandemic, and Beth, coming from the college tour, reached out to us 60 00:04:27.399 --> 00:04:30.600 and presented this idea and it just seemed really you week and different to us. 61 00:04:30.639 --> 00:04:35.319 So the idea that we could be on Amazon prime, on IMDBTV and 62 00:04:35.360 --> 00:04:39.399 that we could really you know, we're a small regional school, but we 63 00:04:39.480 --> 00:04:42.839 do have students from all over the country and how can we reach more of 64 00:04:42.879 --> 00:04:47.680 those students and really show off that unique all of our unique characteristics and try 65 00:04:47.720 --> 00:04:51.000 something new? So we really took that leap of faith. We met up 66 00:04:51.079 --> 00:04:55.879 with the producers, Alex Boylan and Lisa Hennessey, right off the bat and 67 00:04:55.879 --> 00:04:59.680 we're just really impressed by them. They really cared about who we were, 68 00:04:59.680 --> 00:05:02.720 who we are, and they took the time to listen to any concerns we 69 00:05:02.759 --> 00:05:06.040 had and you know, they were feeling out the same way we were. 70 00:05:06.120 --> 00:05:10.959 So I think we got some extra special attention from them and it was just 71 00:05:11.120 --> 00:05:15.240 it was a really fun experience the whole the whole way through. So the 72 00:05:15.240 --> 00:05:17.160 way that we actually made it happen was we were, because of Covid we 73 00:05:17.160 --> 00:05:21.040 were really reassessing what our budget looked like and how we could use it more 74 00:05:21.040 --> 00:05:26.560 effectively. So one thing that we chose to do was stop our advertising in 75 00:05:26.600 --> 00:05:30.199 the Denver Airport because travel was pretty slow at that point, and we reallocated 76 00:05:30.240 --> 00:05:34.360 that money towards the college, to our experience, and it just really paid 77 00:05:34.360 --> 00:05:38.480 off for us. We had such a good time and it's really cool to 78 00:05:38.480 --> 00:05:42.560 see so many schools signing on there at I think they're over fifty schools on 79 00:05:42.600 --> 00:05:46.199 that on that show now, and that we were part of the the beginning 80 00:05:46.240 --> 00:05:48.319 of it was really powerful. Yeah, that's really interesting. We had Alex 81 00:05:48.399 --> 00:05:54.160 Boilan on the the podcast a few episodes ago, one episode forty seven, 82 00:05:54.160 --> 00:05:58.319 and it was it was fastinting. I mean he's such a such an exciting 83 00:05:58.319 --> 00:06:01.240 guy and he's got such a passion for what he's doing and I and I 84 00:06:01.279 --> 00:06:05.079 think that you know, for you guys to be the the inaugural episode and 85 00:06:05.079 --> 00:06:08.639 then to actually see where it's gone, like you said, fifty episodes, 86 00:06:08.920 --> 00:06:13.800 it's pretty amazing and I love that they come in with such a high level 87 00:06:13.879 --> 00:06:17.519 of production and professionalism. I mean having experience on, you know, amazing 88 00:06:17.600 --> 00:06:21.399 race and survivor and all those other shows that they've done before, it really 89 00:06:21.480 --> 00:06:26.920 kind of helped you guys, you know, articulate and and hone your own 90 00:06:26.920 --> 00:06:30.680 stories to be able to tell that was that was that your experience? Absolutely 91 00:06:30.839 --> 00:06:32.000 so I was. I mean we knew they were coming in with that high 92 00:06:32.000 --> 00:06:35.680 production value, but it still blew us away and I think it was just 93 00:06:35.720 --> 00:06:40.079 such a cool experience for the students. We had ton of our students featured 94 00:06:40.079 --> 00:06:43.480 on the show and they just loved everything they got to do. I mean 95 00:06:43.519 --> 00:06:46.680 they were treated by big stars and they get to share their individual stories. 96 00:06:46.720 --> 00:06:50.000 Alex did a great job of prompting them to write their own scripts. They're 97 00:06:50.040 --> 00:06:56.199 not handed language to regurgitate. It's really they're telling their own stories and we 98 00:06:56.279 --> 00:06:59.959 just help shape it in a way that works and I just it was such 99 00:06:59.959 --> 00:07:04.079 a cool experience and it helped us rethink how we shoot our media because, 100 00:07:04.199 --> 00:07:08.040 you know, we have a full time videographer and a full time photographer and 101 00:07:08.120 --> 00:07:11.959 staff. But the way they came in and got so much content in one 102 00:07:12.000 --> 00:07:15.639 week, I really sort of reconsidered the idea of a blitz. So really 103 00:07:15.759 --> 00:07:17.120 just, you know, go out on one day and try and shoot in 104 00:07:17.160 --> 00:07:20.959 ten locations and make sure that we're focusing on that side. Because of Covid 105 00:07:21.000 --> 00:07:25.120 we haven't actually been able to do that, but as soon as mass a 106 00:07:25.240 --> 00:07:29.600 off, we fully intend to, you know, take that habit into our 107 00:07:29.639 --> 00:07:32.680 production schedule as well. That's great because I'm just kind of reminiscing now about 108 00:07:32.759 --> 00:07:38.399 last week's episode with Dr Mark Job at Moody Bible Institute. He really talked 109 00:07:38.439 --> 00:07:44.199 about the importance of authentic storytelling and really leaning into video and it seems to 110 00:07:44.279 --> 00:07:46.360 me like that's a lot of the lessons that you learned through this experience with 111 00:07:46.399 --> 00:07:49.879 the college tour and and it would probably go forward, like you said. 112 00:07:49.560 --> 00:07:54.439 Now tell me a little bit about how I mean anytime you invest in some 113 00:07:54.519 --> 00:07:58.000 new way of communicating, I mean certainly everybody says, Oh, if I 114 00:07:58.040 --> 00:08:01.079 can put a billboard up at the airport or at this location in town, 115 00:08:01.079 --> 00:08:07.560 than I can expect these kind of results. What kind of tangible results have 116 00:08:07.600 --> 00:08:11.399 you guys seen from from, you know, being the inaugural episode on this 117 00:08:11.079 --> 00:08:16.639 Prime TV, imdb type TV experience? You know it. The Roi is 118 00:08:16.680 --> 00:08:18.439 tough too, and I always struggle with this. Is, you know, 119 00:08:18.680 --> 00:08:24.199 proving a very clear Roi and the efforts that we make. I will say 120 00:08:24.199 --> 00:08:28.240 that it's just anecdotally, it's been phenomenal. So we were really focusing on 121 00:08:28.279 --> 00:08:31.200 reaching perspective students, reaching their parents, and that's about as far as as 122 00:08:31.200 --> 00:08:37.679 we were expecting. The other audiences we reached have been so powerful to, 123 00:08:37.919 --> 00:08:41.399 you know, our leadership. So we reached our you know, other college 124 00:08:41.399 --> 00:08:46.720 presidents were superimpressed. Other, you know, people who are on foundations that 125 00:08:46.759 --> 00:08:50.759 we have close relationships with. It really really reach through all sort of levels 126 00:08:50.799 --> 00:08:56.200 of society, which was and just every single constituency. The alumni loved it, 127 00:08:56.399 --> 00:09:00.639 the parents loved it, current students loved it, and so we were 128 00:09:00.679 --> 00:09:05.279 just really pleased with the how far they the message really reach. It was 129 00:09:05.360 --> 00:09:11.120 tough to make a exact correlation between being on the college tour and and how 130 00:09:11.120 --> 00:09:15.519 we are performing admission wise, but our admissions up, we just said, 131 00:09:15.559 --> 00:09:20.639 are in the fall we had our largest freshman class in fifteen years and our 132 00:09:20.720 --> 00:09:24.480 largest overall class in five years. So I definitely the college tour had something 133 00:09:24.519 --> 00:09:26.879 to do. It do with it, even if we couldn't make every single 134 00:09:26.960 --> 00:09:30.559 line connect there. That's great. That's great. I think it's it's unique. 135 00:09:30.559 --> 00:09:33.759 It's interesting to me that, as you describe the different constituents that kind 136 00:09:33.759 --> 00:09:37.120 of were touched by that, you know, you obviously that's a that's a 137 00:09:37.159 --> 00:09:39.240 diverse group of people that you just talked about with. You've got your board, 138 00:09:39.320 --> 00:09:43.600 you've got other college presidents, you've got your own leadership, parents, 139 00:09:43.639 --> 00:09:46.080 I mean all kinds of people. I guess that kind of even reflects back 140 00:09:46.120 --> 00:09:50.240 to Troy's initial conversation early on, is that when we look at how, 141 00:09:50.279 --> 00:09:54.159 you know, even like the Tallet College tour could impact, you know, 142 00:09:54.240 --> 00:09:56.919 the internal constituents that are very diverse, but that kind of starts to reflect 143 00:09:56.919 --> 00:10:01.360 a little bit about how the college tours also impacting your external diversity because, 144 00:10:01.360 --> 00:10:05.919 I mean, as you mentioned earlier, got a very unique and diverse community 145 00:10:07.000 --> 00:10:09.919 making sure that that's represented. I mean, certainly that was happened in the 146 00:10:09.960 --> 00:10:13.759 college door, but how are you taking those lessons learned and kind of making 147 00:10:13.840 --> 00:10:18.440 sure that the rest of your marketing communications are really reflecting that diversity and who 148 00:10:18.480 --> 00:10:20.600 you really are across the board? Authenticity is the name of the game. 149 00:10:20.879 --> 00:10:24.159 So we really, you know, we try not to stage too much. 150 00:10:24.159 --> 00:10:30.240 We lean very closely into representing our real students and their real stories the same 151 00:10:30.240 --> 00:10:33.080 way we did with the college tour. Is What's reflected on our social media 152 00:10:33.159 --> 00:10:37.440 and we've got a new social media coordinator in place and she is coming up 153 00:10:37.480 --> 00:10:41.960 with all kinds of amazing new video series that can really show our student story. 154 00:10:41.200 --> 00:10:45.799 She is pushing US way into more video. We used to do, 155 00:10:45.960 --> 00:10:50.360 you know, heavily on photography and let the video creep in on our social 156 00:10:50.440 --> 00:10:54.519 and now I'd think it's an eight twenty split the other direction. We're incredibly 157 00:10:54.559 --> 00:10:56.799 heavy on video and on making sure one of the things we're focusing on this 158 00:10:56.840 --> 00:11:01.240 semester on our team is making sure that the student story is what's told by 159 00:11:01.320 --> 00:11:05.519 students. So we're always hoping to do that. But we're doing a lot 160 00:11:05.559 --> 00:11:09.720 more day in the life videos with students on you know, shooting their own 161 00:11:09.720 --> 00:11:16.320 content. We're doing working with our influencer and ambassador programs and we're starting a 162 00:11:16.360 --> 00:11:20.679 new series called college cuts that will highlight our student research in the words of 163 00:11:20.679 --> 00:11:24.279 our students. So super excited about all those options. That's great. Just 164 00:11:24.320 --> 00:11:28.039 out of curiosity. What what social channels are you leaning on for this? 165 00:11:28.360 --> 00:11:31.759 The student stories? We're really heavy on Instagram, mostly on reels these days, 166 00:11:31.799 --> 00:11:35.679 and you know, as instagrams pivoting sort of within itself, I think 167 00:11:35.759 --> 00:11:39.759 it's a very interesting platform. Tick Tock is another really fun one for us 168 00:11:39.759 --> 00:11:45.399 and that's where we really push truly student generated content, because you don't want 169 00:11:45.399 --> 00:11:48.679 to look like the old guy and the one who doesn't know how it's supposed 170 00:11:48.720 --> 00:11:52.720 to be working or the one taking itself too seriously. It's exactly yeah, 171 00:11:52.840 --> 00:11:56.639 we're really you know, we're soliciting ideas from students really actively. We hire 172 00:11:56.679 --> 00:12:01.519 a ton of student interns so that we can make sure that our audience and 173 00:12:01.600 --> 00:12:03.840 that we're using media in the right way to reach our perspective students. I 174 00:12:03.840 --> 00:12:07.799 love that because I think that far too often, I think that we try 175 00:12:07.799 --> 00:12:11.919 to think at it, think of the marketing through the Lens of who we 176 00:12:11.960 --> 00:12:16.480 are personally. So, you know, like myself, a fifty two year 177 00:12:16.519 --> 00:12:20.399 old, you know, White Male, is not going to necessarily know exactly 178 00:12:20.519 --> 00:12:22.279 the right way to do social media. I mean, I'm a professional, 179 00:12:22.320 --> 00:12:26.679 so I can point in the direction by asking questions like this and observing. 180 00:12:26.759 --> 00:12:30.720 But at the same time I think you're right. The students voice is going 181 00:12:30.720 --> 00:12:35.000 to be a lot clear, a lot more articulate and more powerful on platforms 182 00:12:35.080 --> 00:12:39.720 like tick talk and Instagram, whereas you know, maybe that maybe there's more 183 00:12:39.759 --> 00:12:45.840 ways to use facebook and other areas for alumni and some of those other constituencies 184 00:12:45.879 --> 00:12:48.200 that we talked about, but I think that's just a I bring that point 185 00:12:48.240 --> 00:12:54.080 up because I find still far too many schools are relying on facebook to try 186 00:12:54.080 --> 00:12:58.639 to recruit students and I'm guessing that's not part of your strategy. They are 187 00:12:58.679 --> 00:13:01.799 not there. I mean we're absolutely putting content out there, but you're right, 188 00:13:01.120 --> 00:13:05.440 we're angling it more towards influencers. Be that. Parents do that, 189 00:13:05.600 --> 00:13:11.399 you know, high school counselors. So we're trying to be in every platform 190 00:13:11.440 --> 00:13:13.960 where we can actually do it well. I always say that it's better to 191 00:13:15.039 --> 00:13:18.120 be on fewer platforms and get it right than to try to be everywhere. 192 00:13:18.279 --> 00:13:20.879 But you know, when we're reaching students, were making sure that we're hitting 193 00:13:20.879 --> 00:13:24.679 the right demographics of those media. That's great. If anyone has a conversation 194 00:13:24.840 --> 00:13:31.320 with Lindsay, you going to hear the phrase the Skyhawk Way and I'm assuming 195 00:13:31.399 --> 00:13:35.440 that's part of the DNA when you are at Fort Lewis. But like to 196 00:13:35.480 --> 00:13:41.639 talk formally about branding and you know your approach to how you develop your brand 197 00:13:41.720 --> 00:13:46.159 and if you could share with us over the years how that's come about. 198 00:13:46.279 --> 00:13:50.320 Absolutely I think we've had a really interesting journey in that in that world. 199 00:13:50.360 --> 00:13:52.600 You know, five ten years ago we didn't even have much of a marketing 200 00:13:52.600 --> 00:13:56.080 department. When I started here fifteen years ago, the marketing department was one 201 00:13:56.120 --> 00:14:01.200 and a half people and it's slowly grown over time. But because of a 202 00:14:01.279 --> 00:14:05.159 lack of resources, both human and financial, we didn't have a lot of 203 00:14:05.159 --> 00:14:09.200 clarity around who we were and who what our brand was. So in two 204 00:14:09.200 --> 00:14:13.519 thousand and eighteen, two thousand and nineteen, we started really addressing that. 205 00:14:13.600 --> 00:14:18.000 It started with a website audit where we just wanted to update our website and 206 00:14:18.559 --> 00:14:20.840 the company we worked with on that audit said you you can't even start on 207 00:14:20.840 --> 00:14:24.360 your website yet. You need to figure out this core of who you are 208 00:14:24.519 --> 00:14:28.000 first, and so we took their advice. We really reached out for an 209 00:14:28.039 --> 00:14:33.799 ARP for our brand articulation. We ended up with a firm called one hundred 210 00:14:33.799 --> 00:14:37.759 and sixty over ninety. It's out of mostly Lah and Philly, and we 211 00:14:37.879 --> 00:14:39.840 the you know, they spent a lot of time on our campus. We 212 00:14:39.879 --> 00:14:43.960 talked to them nonstop and they did an incredible job of diving deep into who 213 00:14:43.960 --> 00:14:48.679 you are and really helping us articulate our brand both visually and conceptually and verbally, 214 00:14:50.200 --> 00:14:52.519 and that is has given us this really powerful playbook that we still use 215 00:14:52.600 --> 00:14:56.960 till today and will continue to use on for many more years. For sure. 216 00:14:56.960 --> 00:15:00.360 That's great. I've got a great deal of respect for that company. 217 00:15:00.399 --> 00:15:03.759 They do they do great work and I think that, you know, I 218 00:15:03.799 --> 00:15:07.840 think it's such a powerful tool and I think it really, kind of, 219 00:15:09.080 --> 00:15:13.039 really, kind of gives some freedom to the clients when they can clearly articulate 220 00:15:13.080 --> 00:15:15.919 the brand. Because, I mean, I think everybody kind of gets it 221 00:15:15.960 --> 00:15:20.200 internally and it's like I get it, and especially we hear that when students 222 00:15:20.200 --> 00:15:22.080 come to do a campus visit. I mean every every school will say, 223 00:15:22.080 --> 00:15:24.200 well, if I can get them on campus, then I know that they're 224 00:15:24.200 --> 00:15:28.480 going to come. And I think that that is the fact that the students 225 00:15:28.480 --> 00:15:31.360 are coming in there experiencing the brand. They're they're living it out and I 226 00:15:31.360 --> 00:15:35.360 think part of the challenge for schools and high reed marketers is how can we 227 00:15:35.440 --> 00:15:41.240 articulate that and put it and put it into a playbook that we can repeat 228 00:15:41.279 --> 00:15:43.679 outside of a campus visit. We can repeat in, you know, in 229 00:15:43.799 --> 00:15:48.000 a in a show like the college tour, we can repeat and in an 230 00:15:48.000 --> 00:15:52.080 instagram post or, you know, an ad in a paper, click add 231 00:15:52.159 --> 00:15:56.120 or other ways. I think that you know what was some of those threads 232 00:15:56.200 --> 00:16:00.279 that they found when they looked at the Skyhawk way, I mean, if 233 00:16:00.320 --> 00:16:02.720 you kind of look at your playbook, what are kind of those threads that 234 00:16:02.799 --> 00:16:03.879 kind of go through that? A lot of it, I mean we have 235 00:16:04.039 --> 00:16:07.559 our students come from such diverse backgrounds that that's something we always struggled with. 236 00:16:07.679 --> 00:16:11.720 And when you talk about a lot of times people on campus have the right 237 00:16:11.759 --> 00:16:17.120 concept. It's just struggling to articulate it. Even within campus we really struggled 238 00:16:17.159 --> 00:16:21.799 to to all be consistent about saying who we were. Some people believed we 239 00:16:21.799 --> 00:16:25.799 were a very classic Leoberal Arts Institution. Others thought it was more of a 240 00:16:25.799 --> 00:16:30.519 ski and adventure school. So we had a lot of different inflicting messages and 241 00:16:30.600 --> 00:16:34.039 so a lot of the work that we did with one sixty over ninety came 242 00:16:34.080 --> 00:16:38.279 out to this common threat of Grit. So whether our students are coming from, 243 00:16:38.320 --> 00:16:44.360 you know, inner city Denver or a reservation in New Mexico or, 244 00:16:44.399 --> 00:16:47.799 you know, Marine County in California, they're all bring a certain amount of 245 00:16:47.840 --> 00:16:49.759 grit with them and that's what led them to Fort Louis. We be life. 246 00:16:49.840 --> 00:16:55.279 So it's just really interesting to find that commonality among our very disparate student 247 00:16:55.440 --> 00:16:59.480 group. And so a lot of our our you know, our pillars of 248 00:16:59.480 --> 00:17:03.640 our brand speak to that and speak to working through challenges and, you know, 249 00:17:04.079 --> 00:17:07.519 finding your own way. Things like that became the key of who we 250 00:17:07.559 --> 00:17:11.720 are and you know, it's really helped us. I think our increased enrollment 251 00:17:11.799 --> 00:17:18.119 numbers speak to finding students that are excited to be here and want to connect 252 00:17:18.160 --> 00:17:21.680 with it. You know, we're a small rural school. We're not for 253 00:17:21.720 --> 00:17:25.519 everybody. We don't have Greek life. We, you know, are we 254 00:17:25.559 --> 00:17:27.359 do have an NCAA division two. We have a lot of great sports, 255 00:17:27.400 --> 00:17:30.279 but it's very different than a big state school, even like the one I 256 00:17:30.319 --> 00:17:36.640 attended. So I think finding students that are excited to be here for what 257 00:17:36.720 --> 00:17:40.279 Durango and the Fort Louis campus offers, those of the students that are going 258 00:17:40.319 --> 00:17:44.599 to stick around, be really successful and take advantage of what's here. That's 259 00:17:44.640 --> 00:17:48.680 great. I love the I love that. How even that Word Grit, 260 00:17:48.680 --> 00:17:52.359 I mean that's obviously not showing up in your in your headlines and all that 261 00:17:52.440 --> 00:17:56.480 necessarily, but I think it gives you a framework and I think that's one 262 00:17:56.480 --> 00:18:00.200 of the important things that a brand, a clear brand articulation and really walking 263 00:18:00.240 --> 00:18:04.440 away with a good brand deliverable can allow you to do because all of a 264 00:18:04.480 --> 00:18:07.799 sudden it gives you that framework to be able to say, how do we 265 00:18:07.839 --> 00:18:15.240 communicate these these these stories that overcome challenges, how do we share these different 266 00:18:15.279 --> 00:18:19.680 aspects of who we are through this, through this filter and lens of Grit, 267 00:18:19.680 --> 00:18:23.759 without necessarily, you know, saying that you know specifically, and I 268 00:18:23.759 --> 00:18:27.920 think that's what really makes up a really good grant brand program several times. 269 00:18:27.920 --> 00:18:32.960 So that's great. Lindsay, if you've listened to this show, you know 270 00:18:33.039 --> 00:18:37.400 that we always ask from your perspective, and I guess, in through the 271 00:18:37.480 --> 00:18:42.279 Lens of uniquely marketing a brand, if there's a piece of advice or theory, 272 00:18:42.319 --> 00:18:48.359 an idea that you could offer other marketers out there that they could implement 273 00:18:48.440 --> 00:18:52.839 almost immediately. What would your advice be? I think my best advice is 274 00:18:52.880 --> 00:18:56.240 to hire good people and to listen to them. You know, and in 275 00:18:56.319 --> 00:19:00.519 my role we've talked about as as we sort of age out of digital marketing 276 00:19:00.599 --> 00:19:04.079 or social media, it's so important to stay in tune with young staff and 277 00:19:04.160 --> 00:19:11.200 students and just staff with very specific areas of expertise and really let them do 278 00:19:11.240 --> 00:19:15.119 their thing and support them in that journey. So that's I mean, I 279 00:19:15.160 --> 00:19:18.359 am so fortunate to have such an amazing group of team of people that I 280 00:19:18.440 --> 00:19:22.319 get to work with every day and they just create the most amazing stuff and 281 00:19:22.359 --> 00:19:26.880 they collaborate well and we get recognition for it and we are able to serve 282 00:19:26.920 --> 00:19:30.599 the students that we do because of that. So it's that's something I feel 283 00:19:30.640 --> 00:19:37.319 pretty passionately about and I see sometimes a larger organizations just the complexity. Let's 284 00:19:37.400 --> 00:19:41.559 that not happen. If you have a super rigid brand, I think you're 285 00:19:41.599 --> 00:19:45.279 not able to flex and be creative like a creative team should be. So 286 00:19:45.480 --> 00:19:49.079 listen to your staff. That's great. That's great. Thank you, Lindsay. 287 00:19:49.160 --> 00:19:55.079 If anyone would like to contact you as a result of this conversation, 288 00:19:55.759 --> 00:19:57.799 what would be the best way for them to do that? Definitely can reach 289 00:19:57.799 --> 00:20:02.359 out to me on Linkedin, Lindsay, and I quest it might be the 290 00:20:02.400 --> 00:20:07.160 only one. That's great. Thank you for being a guest with us. 291 00:20:07.200 --> 00:20:11.799 Really enjoyed learning more about you and Fort Lewis Awesome. Thanks so much to 292 00:20:11.799 --> 00:20:15.839 both of you. Bart do you have any thoughts that you would like to 293 00:20:15.880 --> 00:20:18.640 share before we close out today? Yeah, I just have a couple things 294 00:20:18.640 --> 00:20:21.799 that I kind of want to pull to the top of the surface here from 295 00:20:21.799 --> 00:20:25.359 what Lindsay has said, and I want to encourage everyone because I know there's 296 00:20:25.359 --> 00:20:29.079 a lot of different demographics of schools that listen to the podcast. I mean, 297 00:20:29.079 --> 00:20:32.119 we've been growing over the past year and we're grateful for that, but 298 00:20:32.160 --> 00:20:34.559 I know that there are some schools out there that listen to this and you 299 00:20:34.599 --> 00:20:38.079 have one person or one and a half people, as Lindsay kind of talked 300 00:20:38.079 --> 00:20:41.640 about, you know, fifteen years ago when she started at Fort Lewis. 301 00:20:41.680 --> 00:20:45.559 I just want to encourage you that as things change, as things grow, 302 00:20:45.599 --> 00:20:52.559 as marketing impacts things on campus, your team will grow as well, and 303 00:20:52.599 --> 00:20:56.839 I think that what you're hearing Lindsay say today is it should be encouragement for 304 00:20:56.880 --> 00:21:00.160 you to kind of look and prepare and head down the path, start doing 305 00:21:00.160 --> 00:21:03.200 the things that are kind of maybe what you can do because you're nimble, 306 00:21:03.279 --> 00:21:07.279 because you're small, but also kind of listen to the the the wisdom that 307 00:21:07.279 --> 00:21:11.720 comes through this show. I mean Lindsay kind of talked about the authenticity that 308 00:21:11.759 --> 00:21:15.839 she's trying to and her team or trying to come come across with with their 309 00:21:15.880 --> 00:21:18.720 storytelling, with their video, what they learned from the college tour. And 310 00:21:18.759 --> 00:21:21.880 maybe you're not going to be able to have the college tour come to your 311 00:21:21.920 --> 00:21:25.960 campus, but you can watch several seasons of that college tour and see how 312 00:21:26.079 --> 00:21:27.839 see the patterns that they do and how they're doing that. You know, 313 00:21:27.960 --> 00:21:30.960 borrow from that. I mean, and I think that Alex would say that 314 00:21:32.000 --> 00:21:34.720 just as much as as he did on his episode, take advantage of that 315 00:21:34.799 --> 00:21:38.000 and to and see and look at what other people are doing apply it to 316 00:21:38.000 --> 00:21:41.559 your own school, obviously to be the most authentic, but kind of lean 317 00:21:41.640 --> 00:21:45.400 into those places. And then also just this whole idea of brand really taking 318 00:21:45.440 --> 00:21:48.799 the time and if you can, if you can afford to have somebody on 319 00:21:48.839 --> 00:21:52.119 the outside come in, it's probably going to be better. But even if 320 00:21:52.160 --> 00:21:56.039 you just want to do your own exercises internally just to say who are we 321 00:21:56.079 --> 00:21:59.920 and what makes us different, there's all kinds of books, there's resources out 322 00:21:59.960 --> 00:22:02.799 there to be able to walk you through that. But if you can have 323 00:22:02.839 --> 00:22:06.519 that and you can have a playbook, all of a sudden your marketing starts 324 00:22:06.519 --> 00:22:08.240 to take off and it really starts to get legs of its own, and 325 00:22:08.279 --> 00:22:11.000 I think that Lindsay kind of demonstrated that in some of the stories that she 326 00:22:11.119 --> 00:22:17.160 told and the way that they're seeing success in their enrollment and seeing success and 327 00:22:17.240 --> 00:22:22.000 some of the marketing aspects they're doing even by, you know, internal recognition 328 00:22:22.079 --> 00:22:25.640 from the board or from other presidents in the region. It's a lot of 329 00:22:25.640 --> 00:22:29.119 things that can kind of play into that. So again, authenticity, video 330 00:22:29.200 --> 00:22:32.839 and brand and being encourage that, even if you're a small shop, you 331 00:22:32.880 --> 00:22:36.720 can continue to do the good things and grow into something much bigger. Well 332 00:22:36.920 --> 00:22:40.759 said, Bart. That brings us to the end of another episode of the 333 00:22:40.839 --> 00:22:45.440 High Ed Marketer podcast. I show was always sponsored by Taylor solutions and education 334 00:22:45.519 --> 00:22:52.519 marketing and branding agency and by think patented a marketing execution company combining print and 335 00:22:52.640 --> 00:22:59.160 personalization for engagement success. On behalf of Bart Kaylor, my cohost, I'm 336 00:22:59.240 --> 00:23:04.759 Troye singer. We are grateful that you joined us. You've been listening to 337 00:23:04.799 --> 00:23:10.200 the Higher Ed Marketer. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe 338 00:23:10.240 --> 00:23:15.079 to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you're listening with apple podcasts. 339 00:23:15.079 --> 00:23:18.359 We'd love for you to leave a quick rating of the show. Simply 340 00:23:18.400 --> 00:23:22.400 tap the number of stars you think the podcast deserves. Until next time,