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Aug. 17, 2021

Omni-Channel Platforms: Automate & Personalize Your Marketing

Omni-Channel Platforms: Automate & Personalize Your Marketing

The marketing process for higher education is characterized by a substantial level of customer interaction. Omni-channel platforms can help you cut through the clutter by automating many of those brand touches.

To tell you more about how to leverage automation and personalization in omni-channel platforms, we invited two experts from Think Patented, Sean Ferguson, Director of Digital Engagement, and Dan Cornelius, Director of Vertical Markets.

We discuss:

-How omni-channel tools let you be smarter with your marketing

- How different channels are leveraged

- Enabling personalization in campaigns through quizzes

- Using lead matching technology to build new audiences

To hear more interviews like this one, subscribe to Higher Ed Marketer on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your preferred podcast platform.

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The Higher Ed Marketer podcast is sponsored by Caylor Solutions, an Education Marketing and Branding Agency, and by Think Patented, a Marketing Execution, Printing and Mailing provider of Higher Ed solutions.

    

 

Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:02.879 --> 00:00:07.190 You were listening to the Higher Ed Marketer, a podcast geared towards marketing professionals 2 00:00:07.230 --> 00:00:11.910 in higher education. This show will tackle all sorts of questions related to student 3 00:00:11.949 --> 00:00:16.070 recruitment, don't a relations, marketing, trends, new technologies and so much 4 00:00:16.070 --> 00:00:20.230 more. If you are looking for conversations centered around where the industry is going, 5 00:00:20.750 --> 00:00:29.019 this podcast is for you. Let's get into the show. Welcome to 6 00:00:29.059 --> 00:00:33.179 the High Ed Marketer podcast. My name is troy singer and I am always 7 00:00:33.179 --> 00:00:38.130 here with my cohost, Bart Taylor, and usually we interview highed marketers that 8 00:00:38.210 --> 00:00:43.170 we admire in the area, but today we're going to have a conversation with 9 00:00:43.490 --> 00:00:48.170 our team members and kind of pull the curtain back on some of the tools 10 00:00:48.210 --> 00:00:52.240 and some of the things that are out there that are available in the marketing 11 00:00:52.280 --> 00:00:56.079 sphere. Yeah, Troy, it's a it's a fun conversation and it's fun 12 00:00:56.159 --> 00:00:58.320 sometimes to just kind of, like you said, pull the curtain back. 13 00:00:58.759 --> 00:01:00.520 We always talk about all these ideas and these different ways of doing it. 14 00:01:02.039 --> 00:01:03.829 Sometimes, I think actually getting a little bit pragmatic and just saying hey, 15 00:01:03.909 --> 00:01:07.109 this is exactly how we're doing some things, and we've been working on a 16 00:01:07.189 --> 00:01:11.909 project together now for probably about six or eight months. That just launched this 17 00:01:11.989 --> 00:01:15.590 past week. It's a big search campaign for a midsized university in the Midwest. 18 00:01:17.189 --> 00:01:19.299 We were so excited just seeing the initial results in this fact first week 19 00:01:19.299 --> 00:01:23.260 or two with the campaign, with a lot of the dashboards that we have 20 00:01:23.340 --> 00:01:26.659 access to, utilizing the tools that we talked about today, we just thought, 21 00:01:26.659 --> 00:01:30.819 hey, wouldn't it be cool just to kind of bringing some of our 22 00:01:30.980 --> 00:01:34.209 listeners into a conversation about what's going on, how we're doing it? And 23 00:01:34.329 --> 00:01:38.129 again, it's early in the process and we're not going to drop any names 24 00:01:38.329 --> 00:01:42.730 of schools that we're working with, but it's one of those situations where we 25 00:01:42.769 --> 00:01:44.930 felt so good about it we thought, hey, let's bring in the team 26 00:01:44.930 --> 00:01:47.840 and talk a little bit about what we're doing, the tools that we're doing, 27 00:01:47.879 --> 00:01:51.079 kind of the strategy behind it and and and just talk a little bit 28 00:01:51.079 --> 00:01:55.640 about that. It's a good conversation. Yes, both of our individuals today 29 00:01:55.640 --> 00:02:00.760 are from think patented. They're my team members, so Dan Cornelius, he's 30 00:02:00.799 --> 00:02:05.790 going to be bringing the strategies perspective, and then Sean Ferguson, he is 31 00:02:05.909 --> 00:02:09.949 on the technical side. Both of them will combine to give great overviews of 32 00:02:10.189 --> 00:02:15.900 tools that are available for us to execute for colleges and universities. And with 33 00:02:16.020 --> 00:02:23.780 that said, let's bring in Dan and Sean Bart and I are very proud 34 00:02:24.020 --> 00:02:30.930 to introduce to the conversation Dan Cornelius and Sean Ferguson into the podcast and just 35 00:02:31.129 --> 00:02:37.009 let everyone know we are going to let you in on conversations that we usually 36 00:02:37.050 --> 00:02:40.009 have because we are very familiar with one another as we work on projects, 37 00:02:40.090 --> 00:02:45.759 both Bart's team and then myself, Sean and Dan. So if I can 38 00:02:45.840 --> 00:02:50.840 ask Dan if you can introduce yourself and what your role is, and then 39 00:02:50.960 --> 00:02:53.680 also followed by Sean. Yeah, hi, troy, no problem. My 40 00:02:53.719 --> 00:02:59.069 name is Dan Cornelius and I am the director integrated marketing solutions at think, 41 00:02:59.150 --> 00:03:04.349 patented. My role is to assist the sales team and introducing their clients to 42 00:03:04.509 --> 00:03:08.030 the various products and services that we have that can help them improve upon the 43 00:03:08.110 --> 00:03:13.500 effectiveness of their outreach campaigns. It's they're currently doing. I also bring a 44 00:03:13.580 --> 00:03:16.659 little bit of a strategy to the table and to best practices that I've experienced 45 00:03:16.740 --> 00:03:23.419 over the years working with different schools and institutions and student recruitment and fundraising campaigns. 46 00:03:23.819 --> 00:03:25.620 Thank you, Dan, and we also have Sean Ferguson. Yes, 47 00:03:25.740 --> 00:03:30.490 Hello Sean, Hello Troy. I'm Sean Ferguson. I'm the director of digital 48 00:03:30.530 --> 00:03:36.969 engagement at think patted, so I oversee the technical execution of, you know, 49 00:03:37.050 --> 00:03:40.680 Omni Channel Marketing campaigns, web development, APP development, web development. 50 00:03:40.879 --> 00:03:46.319 So can certainly get into the weeds of all the technical execution of everything we're 51 00:03:46.319 --> 00:03:50.680 talking about today. Thank you both. And again, just so everyone knows, 52 00:03:51.159 --> 00:03:54.909 we are very used to working with one another where barts team comes up 53 00:03:55.030 --> 00:04:02.870 with the strategy and the process and the marketing outreach map and our team executes 54 00:04:02.909 --> 00:04:09.189 it. So I would like to pose our first subject of automation and what 55 00:04:09.389 --> 00:04:14.580 that looks like for an on each channel platform in a higher ED market world. 56 00:04:14.819 --> 00:04:17.459 So either Bart or Dan, if you can kind of give me your 57 00:04:17.579 --> 00:04:20.699 view of that? Yeah, I can jump in on that, troy, 58 00:04:20.699 --> 00:04:25.449 and this is this is a great conversation to have, kind of kind of 59 00:04:25.490 --> 00:04:28.209 pulling the curtain backs to everybody can kind of here are some of the things 60 00:04:28.209 --> 00:04:30.730 that you said. Like with with our with our conversations going. But one 61 00:04:30.769 --> 00:04:33.889 of the reasons why I think we have been drawn at Keeler solutions to automation. 62 00:04:34.250 --> 00:04:39.240 And what really helps with automation in the marketing world, especially for Higher 63 00:04:39.240 --> 00:04:44.319 Ed is it's such a high touch sales process and I know a lot of 64 00:04:44.360 --> 00:04:46.199 people in high it sometimes don't like the word sales. I was talking to 65 00:04:46.240 --> 00:04:49.720 a school recently that just didn't want to even have that in the lexicon of 66 00:04:49.839 --> 00:04:56.550 our conversation. But the reality is is that we are selling individuals and families 67 00:04:56.629 --> 00:05:00.269 one of the biggest investments they'll ever make in their life, sometimes even more 68 00:05:00.350 --> 00:05:03.269 than the homes that they'll purchase, these investments in their education and what that's 69 00:05:03.310 --> 00:05:06.180 going to change and how that's going to do that. Because of that it's 70 00:05:06.180 --> 00:05:09.779 such a high touch process. I mean you know, if you look at 71 00:05:09.779 --> 00:05:13.740 a search campaign and you're buying names and then marketing to them, trying to 72 00:05:13.779 --> 00:05:16.779 get them to to kind of engage, even down to the comflow in a 73 00:05:16.860 --> 00:05:24.009 typical admissions office, there's a lot of touches with that and technology allows us 74 00:05:24.490 --> 00:05:27.449 the automation. I was like to think of it in the way that let 75 00:05:27.529 --> 00:05:31.089 computers do what they do best, which is repetitive tasks that they can just 76 00:05:31.129 --> 00:05:35.920 do at a preprogram time with a preprogram message. Let them do that let 77 00:05:35.959 --> 00:05:41.639 the computers automate, but let your admissions team then focus on their relationship building, 78 00:05:41.680 --> 00:05:46.240 the conversations, the the high touch points, and so automation let's this 79 00:05:46.279 --> 00:05:48.920 kind of engage with a lot more people on a regular basis through all these 80 00:05:49.000 --> 00:05:54.509 different channels without having to let leverage and utilize, you know, man and 81 00:05:54.550 --> 00:05:57.790 woman power to do that. And so I think automation just as such a 82 00:05:58.029 --> 00:06:01.110 critical element that a lot of schools have embraced. Some schools are still on 83 00:06:01.230 --> 00:06:06.100 the fringes of it and I think that sometimes when we start looking at customer 84 00:06:06.139 --> 00:06:13.500 relationship management tools, C RMS versus Omni channel platforms, different CRMS. Maybe 85 00:06:13.500 --> 00:06:15.579 Dan can talk a little bit more about that. But the idea that there 86 00:06:15.620 --> 00:06:21.449 are different ways we have these tools on on campuses that that schools can leverage 87 00:06:21.490 --> 00:06:26.290 to be able to create that automation, but many times either they don't know 88 00:06:26.329 --> 00:06:29.370 how to do it or they're not doing it correctly and it comes down a 89 00:06:29.410 --> 00:06:31.209 lot of times with what your tool is versus what you can do. So 90 00:06:31.329 --> 00:06:33.519 maybe Dan, you can tell us little bit about the difference between those. 91 00:06:33.560 --> 00:06:36.839 Yeah, I think you hit the nail on the head. Bart. The 92 00:06:36.959 --> 00:06:41.279 real key here is that automation is a wonderful tool, but how do you 93 00:06:41.319 --> 00:06:44.240 implement it and how do you ease into it? Most schools are going to 94 00:06:44.279 --> 00:06:47.069 have legacy systems in place and so that's what they're most comfortable with and they 95 00:06:47.110 --> 00:06:50.670 think that they're doing things in a very productive manner and if they really do 96 00:06:50.709 --> 00:06:54.829 a deeper dive at times it can start to see how these solutions can really 97 00:06:54.870 --> 00:06:59.550 help benefit their teams and make their teams more productive and effective in their their 98 00:06:59.550 --> 00:07:03.500 outbound reaches and communication channels to productive students and alumni. So, as an 99 00:07:03.579 --> 00:07:08.500 entry level into these omni channels solutions that are out there, the first one 100 00:07:08.540 --> 00:07:11.620 you're going to have as one that would be more of a high level anonymous 101 00:07:11.660 --> 00:07:14.899 approach. It's going to help you broadcast your message across all the different forms 102 00:07:14.939 --> 00:07:17.889 of media, but you really won't know who you're exactly communicating with. You're 103 00:07:17.889 --> 00:07:21.250 going to have Google display ads online, you're going to have social media follow 104 00:07:21.250 --> 00:07:25.410 up adds that can be in place and you're going to automate and other touches 105 00:07:25.449 --> 00:07:27.490 of it where you're going to start to know who somebody is and you can 106 00:07:27.569 --> 00:07:30.639 start to personalize and understand who that person is and then capture information for your 107 00:07:30.680 --> 00:07:35.560 future uses. So schools have to understand it. There's different levels of automation 108 00:07:35.759 --> 00:07:40.160 and they need to be able to evaluate where they're at and where they need 109 00:07:40.160 --> 00:07:44.279 to be going forward, because you really need to automate those parts that your 110 00:07:44.509 --> 00:07:47.029 team could be more effective and basically speaking, or reaching out to the low 111 00:07:47.110 --> 00:07:53.110 hanging fruit while you continue to cultivate and nurture the other potential people that you 112 00:07:53.149 --> 00:07:55.750 want to speak with, so when they raise your hand, you're ready to 113 00:07:55.750 --> 00:07:59.660 be able to reach back out and have that more personalized conversation, as you 114 00:07:59.819 --> 00:08:01.819 will. The thing I like about some of those tools to don is that, 115 00:08:01.939 --> 00:08:05.860 you know, some of them leverage kind of a scoring mechanism that you 116 00:08:05.899 --> 00:08:11.139 know the more student engages, the more they look at the the ads or 117 00:08:11.180 --> 00:08:13.209 they engage on the website. To Sean's point, we can start to measure 118 00:08:13.290 --> 00:08:18.089 those things and then, instead of looking at Fortyzero people that we just sent 119 00:08:18.129 --> 00:08:22.050 out a direct mail to and we're not really sure how they're responding, some 120 00:08:22.209 --> 00:08:26.490 of these tools that you've been talking about, this omnichannel resources, we start 121 00:08:26.529 --> 00:08:30.160 to have more data that can start to filter up the people that we understand 122 00:08:30.199 --> 00:08:33.480 that are really the ones that are probably the warmest leads. And again, 123 00:08:33.519 --> 00:08:37.559 going into that sales vernacular, the we really want to focus our team's effort. 124 00:08:37.600 --> 00:08:39.759 I mean, if we have an admissions team of eight to ten people, 125 00:08:41.429 --> 00:08:45.029 they cannot just start making calls to fortyzero people. I mean, you 126 00:08:45.309 --> 00:08:46.429 know, a lot of schools try to just divide it up. Hey, 127 00:08:46.509 --> 00:08:50.309 everybody has five thousand a piece and divide that up by a month and let's 128 00:08:50.350 --> 00:08:54.740 try to do a hundred calls a day. That that's old school sales training. 129 00:08:56.220 --> 00:08:58.419 We really want to kind of move into let's figure out who the warmest 130 00:08:58.460 --> 00:09:01.220 leads are, and now all of a sudden the fortyzero get down to maybe 131 00:09:01.500 --> 00:09:05.500 two thousand, and then even the two thousand we can start to look at 132 00:09:05.539 --> 00:09:07.460 and say, Hey, wow, this person has really been engaged in all 133 00:09:07.460 --> 00:09:11.090 these different areas. Let's start putting our focus on our emphasis on that, 134 00:09:11.169 --> 00:09:15.049 because at the end of the day, most schools only need to kind of 135 00:09:15.090 --> 00:09:18.409 bring in a class of three or four hundred, maybe six hundred, depending 136 00:09:18.450 --> 00:09:22.570 on the sky size of the school, and our efforts are better used in 137 00:09:22.690 --> 00:09:24.519 a smart way. And you know, I used to have a mentor that 138 00:09:24.600 --> 00:09:28.320 always talked about let's think smarter rather than thinking harder. It's like, let's 139 00:09:28.320 --> 00:09:31.919 let's kind of be smart about what we're doing, and I think a lot 140 00:09:31.960 --> 00:09:33.159 of these a lot of these tools allow us to do that. Would you 141 00:09:33.159 --> 00:09:37.519 agree with that, Dan? Yeah, I agree with you one hundred percent 142 00:09:37.559 --> 00:09:39.590 about that. What the you a terminology that we like to use as lead 143 00:09:39.669 --> 00:09:43.870 scoring, and you're absolutely correct, and you can create what you call bench 144 00:09:43.950 --> 00:09:48.870 marks based on the interaction that somebody can have with you inside your your actual 145 00:09:48.990 --> 00:09:52.350 marketing tool itself, and then, as those points add up, the minute 146 00:09:52.389 --> 00:09:54.860 they reach a goal, if you will, then that can be an automated 147 00:09:54.860 --> 00:09:58.899 lead that could be sent to a recruitment officer to reach out make that phone 148 00:09:58.899 --> 00:10:03.299 call, or somebody inside the advancement office that would need to be able to 149 00:10:03.340 --> 00:10:05.820 reach out to talk to a high end donor or something like that. So 150 00:10:05.220 --> 00:10:09.529 you're absolutely correct about being able to allow the system to do the nurturing and 151 00:10:09.610 --> 00:10:13.370 then identify, as I keep saying, the low hanging fruit and allowing people 152 00:10:13.730 --> 00:10:18.169 to be able to respond accordingly. Sewan, you have any comments on how 153 00:10:18.210 --> 00:10:20.759 that that acts actually works? I think you know that, Dan. Maybe 154 00:10:20.879 --> 00:10:24.000 just to take a step back I think it's important for people to maybe know 155 00:10:24.200 --> 00:10:30.000 you know, when we're talking about these Omni channel automation systems, it's not 156 00:10:30.159 --> 00:10:33.799 necessarily either or. You know, you either have to work with that system 157 00:10:33.840 --> 00:10:39.470 or your crm that you may be familiar with. Many of the Omni channel 158 00:10:39.470 --> 00:10:43.590 marketing tools and CRMS can integrate with each other so that, you know, 159 00:10:43.669 --> 00:10:46.909 you can have the best of both worlds. You can have your data that 160 00:10:46.029 --> 00:10:52.539 you are familiar with, residetial within the university and then also leverage these automation 161 00:10:52.620 --> 00:10:56.299 tools for bleed scoring, like you mentioned, and all these other elements that 162 00:10:56.340 --> 00:11:01.259 I'm sure we'll talk about. Yeah, that's cool. Maybe Danner, Shawn, 163 00:11:01.299 --> 00:11:03.779 you guys can kind of talk through when we talk about Omni Channel. 164 00:11:03.779 --> 00:11:05.289 I think a lot of people are kind of like, okay, what's that? 165 00:11:05.370 --> 00:11:07.529 That's just another buzz word and how does that work? And obviously Omni 166 00:11:07.649 --> 00:11:11.289 means many and then channels is channels. What are some of the examples of 167 00:11:11.330 --> 00:11:15.289 the different ways that the tools of you guys are using, that we're using 168 00:11:15.370 --> 00:11:18.879 together? I know we've got a couple projects that we're working on together with 169 00:11:18.960 --> 00:11:22.960 with clients, a search campaign and some development work. Tell us a little 170 00:11:22.960 --> 00:11:24.120 bit about what these different channels are. I mean, a lot of people 171 00:11:24.120 --> 00:11:28.480 are probably familiar with email or direct mail. Just kind of walk us through, 172 00:11:28.519 --> 00:11:31.720 because it's more than that. Well, I think that it's important understand. 173 00:11:31.720 --> 00:11:35.389 You can start out with with a direct mail piece. How can you 174 00:11:35.429 --> 00:11:37.230 enhance a direct mail piece? So right out of the gate you'd have tools 175 00:11:37.269 --> 00:11:41.269 such as mail tracking that allow you to identify exactly when a direct mail piece 176 00:11:41.350 --> 00:11:45.950 is going to land into a mailbox, and then you could create any type 177 00:11:45.990 --> 00:11:50.220 of internal follow up processes and procedures you wanted in case, if you were 178 00:11:50.259 --> 00:11:52.460 in the middle of a so fundraising campaign, you could have people call out 179 00:11:52.500 --> 00:11:56.539 to engage at potential donor, for instance, or at least the VIP donors, 180 00:11:56.539 --> 00:12:00.179 if you will. So again, we're talking about spending our time with 181 00:12:00.299 --> 00:12:03.049 a more important people in your database versus the whole mass, if you will. 182 00:12:03.490 --> 00:12:07.409 You can move that into enhancing with informed delivery, which would give you 183 00:12:07.490 --> 00:12:11.490 the ability to basically send an email that comes from the US Postal Service to 184 00:12:11.570 --> 00:12:15.610 the person that you're trying to reach out to. In that email is a 185 00:12:15.690 --> 00:12:18.480 scan of all the direct mail pieces in their mailbox and along with that we 186 00:12:18.559 --> 00:12:22.360 would create a ride along add that allows people to click on it and that 187 00:12:22.480 --> 00:12:26.919 can drive them to an apply page or more information page, or donate now 188 00:12:26.960 --> 00:12:30.470 page for that matter, or an events page. Then you can combine that 189 00:12:30.590 --> 00:12:33.629 by using a Google display network and social media. With social media, we 190 00:12:33.669 --> 00:12:37.870 can identify people that are in a database who can put actual ads on their 191 00:12:37.990 --> 00:12:41.909 feeds. They would see your messaging there. That would be a cohesive and 192 00:12:41.950 --> 00:12:46.019 coordinated effort. Along with your direct mail and email pieces, you also have 193 00:12:46.139 --> 00:12:50.620 the ability to have the Google display network and social media follow up take place. 194 00:12:50.700 --> 00:12:52.740 So again, you're placing cookies on people that have visited. We know 195 00:12:52.820 --> 00:12:56.019 people are going to leave, that go online, over ninety percent of people 196 00:12:56.019 --> 00:13:00.450 will leave. We know that we can drive approximately seventy percent of those people 197 00:13:00.450 --> 00:13:03.250 back online, and statistics out there are saying you can convert sometimes up to 198 00:13:03.289 --> 00:13:07.250 twenty six percent of those people and to responding to your call to action. 199 00:13:07.450 --> 00:13:11.009 so by combining all these tools together, Troy, you I think you know 200 00:13:11.090 --> 00:13:13.960 this number better than I do, but we're able to cut through the clutter 201 00:13:15.240 --> 00:13:18.279 because we need now touch people eight, ten, twelve, twenty times in 202 00:13:18.360 --> 00:13:20.639 order form our message, to resonate and be able to start that dialog. 203 00:13:20.960 --> 00:13:24.840 Thank you, Dan. And the thing to remember is that can happen with 204 00:13:26.039 --> 00:13:31.470 any direct mail campaign. It doesn't have to be intertwined with your crm. 205 00:13:31.029 --> 00:13:35.870 That can happen with any outreach, direct mail correcting that you send out. 206 00:13:37.230 --> 00:13:39.149 No, it's gonna say no. You're absolutely correct. And the only thing 207 00:13:39.190 --> 00:13:41.500 I wanted to say on top of that is all of those tools that I 208 00:13:41.659 --> 00:13:46.860 spoke about are really tools where you're touching people anonymously. You have identified a 209 00:13:46.299 --> 00:13:50.940 group of people in your database, but the communication touch points in the interaction 210 00:13:50.299 --> 00:13:54.100 is anonymous at that point still. So what we're trying to do is engage 211 00:13:54.139 --> 00:13:58.009 them online and once we get them there, then we want to pull them 212 00:13:58.049 --> 00:14:01.289 into a more sophisticated platform that will allow us to identify who they are, 213 00:14:01.490 --> 00:14:05.529 maybe ask some specific questions about them, and then take that information that we 214 00:14:05.649 --> 00:14:11.320 get and personalize the messaging going back out to them. So now we conversion 215 00:14:11.399 --> 00:14:15.039 a direct mail piece with imagery about a course of study that they're interested in. 216 00:14:15.759 --> 00:14:18.799 We can reference anything that we learn about them from a personal standpoint. 217 00:14:18.080 --> 00:14:22.279 Same with the email, but then we can also start engaging in with them 218 00:14:22.320 --> 00:14:26.309 because we've captured maybe a cell phone number they may op them for SMS text 219 00:14:26.350 --> 00:14:30.309 messaging. We have the ability to be able to add in no ring messaging, 220 00:14:30.429 --> 00:14:33.789 for instance. It would leave a matches to them without ringing their phone, 221 00:14:33.950 --> 00:14:37.149 but it's not obtrusive. So if somebody donated x amount of dollars, 222 00:14:37.429 --> 00:14:39.139 they could get a no ring message thanking them. That could be a story 223 00:14:39.179 --> 00:14:43.820 from a student because of their donation, you're helping me succeed and move forward 224 00:14:43.820 --> 00:14:46.139 in my life dreams or my career at school here, or it could be 225 00:14:46.139 --> 00:14:50.139 a story about how you're helping build the new nurse tea lab that needs to 226 00:14:50.179 --> 00:14:52.860 be going in. So lots of different ways to be able to use a 227 00:14:52.929 --> 00:14:56.570 technology and there's lots of ways to bumble it together. Yes, developing true 228 00:14:56.610 --> 00:15:05.970 communication flows that are interactive and enable the Enrollment Department or the alumni department to 229 00:15:05.169 --> 00:15:09.120 know who was interacting with that campaign in real time. Yeah, I just 230 00:15:09.240 --> 00:15:11.759 wanted to point out for our listeners that, you know, there's we were 231 00:15:11.759 --> 00:15:16.279 kind of kind of backing up a lot of information here and so I wanted 232 00:15:16.279 --> 00:15:18.279 to kind of just, you know, kind of separated out a little bit 233 00:15:18.279 --> 00:15:20.509 because one of the first things that you know, we talked about this omnichannel 234 00:15:20.549 --> 00:15:24.149 marketing and especially on that first blast, when the first emails go out in 235 00:15:24.190 --> 00:15:28.190 the first direct mail, a lot of what Dan talked about, with the 236 00:15:28.309 --> 00:15:31.629 Google ad network, with with inform delivery, with mail tracking, all of 237 00:15:31.750 --> 00:15:35.500 those things. It's really designed that we're warming somebody up, really trying to 238 00:15:35.539 --> 00:15:41.460 make sure that the brand awareness of that campaign is kind of everywhere. It's 239 00:15:41.460 --> 00:15:43.539 kind of omnipresent, and so we want to make sure that if they're on 240 00:15:43.580 --> 00:15:48.139 their facebook feed that day, the day before, the day of and maybe 241 00:15:48.179 --> 00:15:50.529 the day after, that mail is going to drop in their household, we 242 00:15:50.690 --> 00:15:54.570 can know what day the mail's going to drop. We can start pushing those 243 00:15:54.570 --> 00:15:58.370 ads for three days and all the sudden it's like, Oh, I've never 244 00:15:58.529 --> 00:16:00.570 seen that school and you know what, I saw it on facebook today. 245 00:16:00.570 --> 00:16:03.639 I just logged in instagram. It happens to be there. To look at 246 00:16:03.679 --> 00:16:07.159 that Google retargeting add that's about that school. Oh you know what, look 247 00:16:07.159 --> 00:16:11.320 what came in the mailbox today. It's about that school. Oh Wow, 248 00:16:11.360 --> 00:16:15.600 I just got a phone message or a text message from somebody at that school. 249 00:16:15.639 --> 00:16:18.309 All of a sudden the brand awareness in that three or four days has 250 00:16:18.350 --> 00:16:22.710 just gone through the roof, and that's one of the things that Omni channel 251 00:16:22.710 --> 00:16:26.750 marketing is doing, is that it's warming people up to your messaging because, 252 00:16:26.789 --> 00:16:30.950 again, if you just simply send a direct mail piece. And to Dan 253 00:16:30.110 --> 00:16:33.740 Choice Point is that statistics show that, you know, twelve, Fifteen, 254 00:16:33.820 --> 00:16:38.179 twenty time of touches is before people start to remember a brand, and so 255 00:16:38.539 --> 00:16:44.139 what we're trying to do is get those brand touches as frequently and as concentrated 256 00:16:44.179 --> 00:16:47.370 as we can so that when we do deliver that message, whether it's the 257 00:16:47.450 --> 00:16:51.049 email, whether it's the direct mail piece, that end that we're going to 258 00:16:51.129 --> 00:16:55.289 continue nurturing that people are already aware of it and they're kind of curious and 259 00:16:55.330 --> 00:16:59.129 they're looking into that because the brand awareness is so strong. Then I think 260 00:16:59.169 --> 00:17:02.080 that, you know, part of what Dana saying is that now that we've 261 00:17:02.120 --> 00:17:06.759 got their attention and they start engaging, how can we harvest more information from 262 00:17:06.759 --> 00:17:10.279 them to make it more personal and I think that's probably a good conversation to 263 00:17:10.359 --> 00:17:14.160 have. Is a little bit about personalization and why that is so critical. 264 00:17:14.240 --> 00:17:18.869 I mean that you see the statistics about generation Z, especially, they really 265 00:17:18.990 --> 00:17:25.269 want to be known and and whether it's a quiz that we ask them or 266 00:17:25.430 --> 00:17:27.710 whether we engage with them in different ways. Maybe there's some gated content that 267 00:17:27.829 --> 00:17:32.579 we drive them to. We want to know more about them than maybe what 268 00:17:32.660 --> 00:17:37.579 we know just from the purchase lists. And so you know, maybe maybe 269 00:17:37.660 --> 00:17:41.019 troy, you can tell us a little bit about this program that we're developing 270 00:17:41.099 --> 00:17:44.259 for another school with this quiz. I mean the whole nature was to get 271 00:17:44.259 --> 00:17:47.130 to know people a little bit better. Right. Yes, and I'll also 272 00:17:47.250 --> 00:17:49.609 the lean on Shan a little bit because he's doing all the work behind the 273 00:17:49.690 --> 00:17:55.369 scenes. But as we were, as you were describing personalization, I think 274 00:17:55.569 --> 00:17:59.839 when we think of personalization we think of first name, we think of just 275 00:18:00.000 --> 00:18:04.880 a couple of high level items. But as we are interacting with the perspective 276 00:18:04.920 --> 00:18:11.000 student or this perspective donor, what we're doing is getting additional information than we 277 00:18:11.119 --> 00:18:15.150 can reach back out to them or reach back out to their parents and demonstrate 278 00:18:15.710 --> 00:18:22.589 we know who you are in Sean. You helped develop or you helped design 279 00:18:23.150 --> 00:18:30.940 a program that's executing barts program of a quiz that we are doing for a 280 00:18:30.059 --> 00:18:33.619 school at this time. Can you give us a little look into how you 281 00:18:33.740 --> 00:18:40.059 did that? Sure, so you know the personalization is not even to just 282 00:18:40.220 --> 00:18:45.009 the individual. We know, the personalization is for the different sets of audiences 283 00:18:45.009 --> 00:18:48.569 as well. So if you want to target, you know, sophomores differently 284 00:18:48.690 --> 00:18:52.009 than juniors and seniors and then within those groups and you can personalize down to 285 00:18:52.170 --> 00:18:56.200 the actual individual. With the program that we are running now, we are 286 00:18:56.200 --> 00:19:03.559 asking slightly different sets of questions to these different groups of students because, you 287 00:19:03.640 --> 00:19:08.160 know, you know with with Sophomores, you know, they may not really 288 00:19:08.799 --> 00:19:12.269 they're not really thinking of financial aid at that point, but certainly for seniors 289 00:19:12.750 --> 00:19:15.950 that that's a you know, hot topic question. So we ask you know, 290 00:19:17.069 --> 00:19:19.349 how prepared are you for financial aid? You know, do you feel 291 00:19:19.430 --> 00:19:22.910 comfortable with it or not? You know sophomore is not so much. So 292 00:19:23.109 --> 00:19:27.220 you know, also, tailoring specifically what you're asking is going to garner you 293 00:19:27.259 --> 00:19:33.539 better results than just treating everyone with with the same treatment and asking the same 294 00:19:33.619 --> 00:19:37.609 questions. So yeah, so, you know, pramptically knowing your audience and 295 00:19:38.609 --> 00:19:44.569 what information you're wanting to garner also help you get the information you were looking 296 00:19:44.569 --> 00:19:49.849 for. And please let us say that it's not boring information. We are 297 00:19:49.849 --> 00:19:53.119 asking them things that they are eager to tell us. You know, what 298 00:19:53.519 --> 00:19:59.000 is the favorite food that they like to eat, what is their favorite music 299 00:19:59.160 --> 00:20:03.359 that they listen to, all these different things that they are giving us or 300 00:20:03.880 --> 00:20:10.230 that they are willing to put into the quiz. Then again, we are 301 00:20:10.269 --> 00:20:14.150 reaching back out to them and demonstrating we hear you, we listen, the 302 00:20:14.269 --> 00:20:19.789 pictures are toward what their answers are, and then we're also sending letters out 303 00:20:19.829 --> 00:20:26.819 to their parents demonstrating that did you, demonstrating that we know who they're students 304 00:20:26.859 --> 00:20:32.700 are, and it's probably surprising to some of those parents of the answers that 305 00:20:32.859 --> 00:20:37.009 the students gave. But the beauty of this that also enables us to kind 306 00:20:37.009 --> 00:20:41.450 of capture how often they're coming back to the landing page and how often they 307 00:20:41.450 --> 00:20:48.529 are interacting with the campaign, which is very useful to the institution because that 308 00:20:48.730 --> 00:20:55.240 goes into the lead scoring. That's something that the institution knows who they can 309 00:20:55.359 --> 00:21:00.079 reach out to most urgently. Yeah, yeah, and I I love the 310 00:21:00.480 --> 00:21:02.920 you know, the work that we all collaborated on with this, with this 311 00:21:03.039 --> 00:21:06.230 current program that we're doing. And again, it just launched a week ago, 312 00:21:06.230 --> 00:21:10.470 so we're not ready to share the name with everybody yet, but needs 313 00:21:10.509 --> 00:21:12.109 us to say, we're seeing a lot of success with it. But my 314 00:21:12.509 --> 00:21:15.829 son is a junior and he his name was purchased on the list and so 315 00:21:15.869 --> 00:21:19.940 it was interesting because we received one of the direct mail pieces at home and, 316 00:21:21.579 --> 00:21:22.619 you know, it's got a Pearl on there. So we scanned it 317 00:21:22.700 --> 00:21:26.180 and and he started looking at the different questions that were on the quiz. 318 00:21:26.259 --> 00:21:30.660 And again, it's a very highly interactive quiz. So don't think about it 319 00:21:30.700 --> 00:21:33.450 like a form of hey, here's radio buttons and check boxes just to kind 320 00:21:33.450 --> 00:21:37.329 of click through, you know, the typical what schools asks. You know 321 00:21:37.450 --> 00:21:41.009 what what you're you're graduating, you know, what are you interested in? 322 00:21:41.809 --> 00:21:44.690 We were actually, you know, as to choice point, asking more about 323 00:21:44.730 --> 00:21:47.880 what what's your favorite food to study with and what's your favorite music to study 324 00:21:47.960 --> 00:21:49.240 by? And you know, if you had, if you had your choice 325 00:21:49.319 --> 00:21:52.480 for a year off, what would you do with it? And so a 326 00:21:52.599 --> 00:21:53.680 lot of this is just kind of fun and there was a lot of you 327 00:21:53.720 --> 00:21:59.400 know, high graphics and Photography and, you know, illustrations and icons and 328 00:22:00.160 --> 00:22:03.549 made it really fun and lighthearted. But the thing I love about it is 329 00:22:03.589 --> 00:22:06.430 that, you know, as a parent, even as I was watching him 330 00:22:06.430 --> 00:22:08.309 do the quiz, I didn't realize that he liked to use, you know, 331 00:22:08.390 --> 00:22:11.390 listen to country music when he studies and I didn't know that, you 332 00:22:11.430 --> 00:22:15.019 know, chips was his preference of of food and that he would rather just 333 00:22:15.099 --> 00:22:18.099 kind of shut his phone off and hit the books rather than calling a friends 334 00:22:18.140 --> 00:22:22.220 for study group. So that was information that was interesting to me that I 335 00:22:22.299 --> 00:22:25.380 could have more conversations with him about, and that's what we're doing when we 336 00:22:25.660 --> 00:22:29.339 include the parent conflow, is sending the parents this information that hey, we 337 00:22:29.500 --> 00:22:32.250 know that your son or daughter, whoever it is, we're going to mention 338 00:22:32.289 --> 00:22:34.450 their name. Thought it was really cool they like listening to country music and 339 00:22:34.529 --> 00:22:37.450 eating chips while they study. We found that pretty cool, though. That 340 00:22:37.730 --> 00:22:42.849 type of conversation, that type of engagement, that's really approachable. It really 341 00:22:42.849 --> 00:22:47.640 changes the way that the students and the parents feel about the school. We're 342 00:22:47.680 --> 00:22:51.640 not we're kind of rising above everybody else and it's not just noise like everything 343 00:22:51.720 --> 00:22:55.240 else. So I know we've got a couple minutes left in troy. If 344 00:22:55.240 --> 00:22:56.440 you don't mind, I'd like to kind of talk a little bit about lead 345 00:22:56.480 --> 00:23:00.910 matching and I think that that's something that's maybe a little bit of a new 346 00:23:00.950 --> 00:23:04.150 technology that, at least when I'm talking to schools and talking to different folks 347 00:23:04.309 --> 00:23:10.349 in enrollment and and development, I know it's been used like in some corporate 348 00:23:10.390 --> 00:23:12.980 worlds and and you know a lot of the retailers use this type of information. 349 00:23:14.700 --> 00:23:17.259 But I think it'd be good just to kind of give somebody a WHO's 350 00:23:17.259 --> 00:23:21.900 listening, just an idea of the technology that we can leverage to build new 351 00:23:22.019 --> 00:23:25.940 audiences for our campaigns just based on this lead match. So, Dan, 352 00:23:25.980 --> 00:23:27.049 I don't know if that's something you want to pick up and talk about. 353 00:23:27.690 --> 00:23:32.490 Sure I'll be moren't happy to the technology that's out there today allows us to 354 00:23:32.569 --> 00:23:37.650 be able to gather people's information when they visit a specific page or website. 355 00:23:37.170 --> 00:23:41.089 We can capture their address, city, state and zip if they happened to 356 00:23:41.130 --> 00:23:44.039 be in your database. We can also capture to their first name and last 357 00:23:44.079 --> 00:23:47.480 name. But we also have the ability, when we do capture that information, 358 00:23:47.599 --> 00:23:49.440 to go out and a pend that data and tie names to it. 359 00:23:49.839 --> 00:23:53.160 So a way of school that can use this is that there are certain programs 360 00:23:53.200 --> 00:23:56.630 and offerings that are out there that are either, you know, to your 361 00:23:56.710 --> 00:24:00.349 point, bar long term sales, which will und be like a state planning, 362 00:24:00.470 --> 00:24:03.990 for instance on the advancement side, or there could be undergraduate programs and 363 00:24:04.029 --> 00:24:07.430 things that are out there. The schools are trying to find people that are 364 00:24:07.430 --> 00:24:10.859 interested in the programs, but you can't specifically go out just by a list 365 00:24:10.900 --> 00:24:14.940 of those type of people. So using this technology, you can start building 366 00:24:14.940 --> 00:24:18.980 a virtual database of people that you need to be responding to and start planning 367 00:24:18.980 --> 00:24:22.220 how you want to reach back out to them because they had a specific interest. 368 00:24:22.579 --> 00:24:26.769 So it's a very valuable tool and helping people start building a database of 369 00:24:26.849 --> 00:24:30.970 really hard to reach potential targets, if you will, because we're able to 370 00:24:30.049 --> 00:24:33.130 capture them when we place this cookie, if you will, on a website 371 00:24:33.170 --> 00:24:38.559 or on a specific page inside a website to identify the unique individuals that we 372 00:24:38.640 --> 00:24:41.000 want to speak to. And I just want to clarify because a lot of 373 00:24:41.039 --> 00:24:44.359 people, you might have listened to that and just said, Oh, yeah, 374 00:24:44.359 --> 00:24:45.319 we can do that. Mean they fill out the form, we get 375 00:24:45.359 --> 00:24:48.200 their name, their address. Know what we're talking about? This is different. 376 00:24:48.240 --> 00:24:52.079 If somebody comes to your website, they don't do anything, they don't 377 00:24:52.079 --> 00:24:53.950 feel out any forms, they don't they don't engage with it other than just 378 00:24:55.069 --> 00:24:59.549 looking at the website, this cookie will pick up the IP number that they're 379 00:24:59.549 --> 00:25:03.269 coming from. Typically every house, just like Your Street Address as a unique 380 00:25:03.269 --> 00:25:07.299 address, you also have a unique digital address. It's called an IP number, 381 00:25:07.299 --> 00:25:11.700 an IP address. We can take that IP address and scrub it against 382 00:25:11.740 --> 00:25:17.059 a national database that ties the IP address of your home to your home physical 383 00:25:17.099 --> 00:25:22.049 address and other demographics. That's what's so powerful about this. Instead of buying 384 00:25:22.250 --> 00:25:26.210 lists from sat or act or other places that you might want to, and 385 00:25:26.250 --> 00:25:30.970 it's especially important for you folks that are in adult and graduate studies where you 386 00:25:30.049 --> 00:25:34.049 cannot buy the lists, if you could actually harvest the data from your website 387 00:25:34.049 --> 00:25:37.920 of people who've come to the website and may be kicked around and looked at 388 00:25:37.920 --> 00:25:41.640 your different adult programs, your different online programs. This lead match allows us 389 00:25:41.680 --> 00:25:45.960 to actually pull down a database of people who've been on your website curious but 390 00:25:47.079 --> 00:25:49.470 never filled out of form. Then we can turn that back into a search 391 00:25:49.549 --> 00:25:53.390 campaign that says, you know, we know these people are interested in our 392 00:25:53.509 --> 00:25:57.109 product or our service, we can start a marketing a campaign with them. 393 00:25:57.190 --> 00:26:00.869 I mean, I talk talk to some people about that and they're like wow, 394 00:26:00.910 --> 00:26:03.910 that's way too creepy, but it depends on how you use it. 395 00:26:03.950 --> 00:26:04.579 I mean, the last thing you want to do is send a letter to 396 00:26:04.660 --> 00:26:07.819 saying hey, we saw that you were anonymously looking on our website and we 397 00:26:07.900 --> 00:26:11.779 figured out who you are and we wanted to let you know that we have 398 00:26:11.940 --> 00:26:14.619 these products. Know, if we treat a more like a search, to 399 00:26:14.740 --> 00:26:17.619 just say hey, we've included you on a list. You know, we're 400 00:26:17.700 --> 00:26:21.369 just we're anonymously letting you know at the beginning and then we start building some 401 00:26:21.490 --> 00:26:23.849 more information on what we know. But I think this lead match is such 402 00:26:23.849 --> 00:26:30.250 an important and powerful technology and tool that again, I think for especially like 403 00:26:30.329 --> 00:26:33.599 adult and graduate programs, it could be so valuable to start building a list 404 00:26:33.640 --> 00:26:36.640 of people that you can mark it to, because leads are very hard to 405 00:26:36.720 --> 00:26:38.319 come by. There's a lot of ways to do it and I think that 406 00:26:38.519 --> 00:26:41.400 this, coupled with some other way, is of the Google add network, 407 00:26:41.559 --> 00:26:45.640 social media advertising, this is a way to start to build up that list 408 00:26:45.680 --> 00:26:52.029 of potential people that can look at your programs, simply capturing individuals that have 409 00:26:52.269 --> 00:26:56.309 expressed interest in your institution that you never knew about. Right, right, 410 00:26:56.990 --> 00:27:03.019 correct. Yes, as we draw our podcast to a close, Dan or 411 00:27:03.019 --> 00:27:08.460 sean are there any final thoughts that you have of anything that we talked about 412 00:27:08.579 --> 00:27:12.339 that we forgot to mention? I'll jump in for just to split second. 413 00:27:12.579 --> 00:27:17.049 I wanted to reiterate what Sean spoke about a rought up originally and barred is 414 00:27:17.049 --> 00:27:21.730 alluded to, and that is personalization is warm terminology where we identify somebody as 415 00:27:21.769 --> 00:27:25.690 an individual and speak to their individual interests, and versioning is a way to 416 00:27:25.730 --> 00:27:27.690 be able to take those people, put them into groups and version some of 417 00:27:27.769 --> 00:27:32.160 the content at a little bit higher level. So again, we can talk 418 00:27:32.160 --> 00:27:34.680 to people are interested in a nursing program or we can talk to people are 419 00:27:34.680 --> 00:27:40.599 interested in an engineering program and then inside that version piece we can personalize it 420 00:27:40.680 --> 00:27:44.119 with an additional information that we capture on them. So we're drilling down in 421 00:27:44.240 --> 00:27:48.390 there into that group, to the personal level of the individual. So personalization 422 00:27:48.549 --> 00:27:52.069 versus versioning. I think it's important to understand that. Thank you, Dan 423 00:27:52.470 --> 00:27:55.990 Sean. I would like to add that, you know, what we find 424 00:27:56.069 --> 00:28:00.140 with a lot of the clients we interact with when we're introducing them to these, 425 00:28:00.619 --> 00:28:03.700 you know, Omni Channel Automation tools is, you know, it takes 426 00:28:03.740 --> 00:28:07.339 a lot of preemptive thought and planning because a lot. You know, the 427 00:28:07.380 --> 00:28:11.500 beauty of these programs is that they are automated and that they can be as 428 00:28:11.980 --> 00:28:15.210 set and forget as you would like. But with that comes a lot of 429 00:28:15.730 --> 00:28:22.049 forethought and okay, how do we want this campaign to run for the next 430 00:28:22.690 --> 00:28:26.490 you know, three months, six months, the whole year? And and 431 00:28:26.049 --> 00:28:29.920 while that can seem like a lot to take in, you know, once 432 00:28:30.000 --> 00:28:33.519 you get an understanding of how these tools can work to your benefit and how 433 00:28:33.599 --> 00:28:41.470 they can customize your outreaches and Garner better responses from your your audience, you 434 00:28:41.589 --> 00:28:45.630 know it's clear that you know it's definitely worth the effort and worth the thought 435 00:28:45.750 --> 00:28:49.630 to plan all of this out. It is very worthwhile, for the results 436 00:28:49.670 --> 00:28:53.430 that you receive, to put all that work and planning into the front end. 437 00:28:55.390 --> 00:28:57.099 Bart, do you have any final thoughts before we wrap it up? 438 00:28:57.099 --> 00:29:00.059 Yeah, I just wanted, I think, that one. Sean Dan, 439 00:29:00.140 --> 00:29:03.619 thanks so much for being on the podcast today. It's just been valuable to 440 00:29:03.660 --> 00:29:07.740 kind of walk through and kind of explain some of these new things that are 441 00:29:07.859 --> 00:29:11.490 really accessible to a lot of schools that maybe they didn't realize. I mean, 442 00:29:11.529 --> 00:29:14.450 there's a lot of ways to kind of scale up and scale down with 443 00:29:14.569 --> 00:29:18.009 these type of programs and I think it's so important to kind of understand what's 444 00:29:18.049 --> 00:29:21.130 available. One thing I wanted to just kind of point out, because I 445 00:29:21.210 --> 00:29:23.210 mentioned this to a client the other day, that we were talking about Nomini 446 00:29:23.250 --> 00:29:27.759 Channel Marketing and and versioning and personalization, and I just wanted to kind of 447 00:29:27.920 --> 00:29:32.720 point out just just to make a comment. You know, we talk a 448 00:29:32.759 --> 00:29:36.720 lot about versioning and a lot of people are already familiar with digital printing and 449 00:29:36.880 --> 00:29:38.670 and I think that digital printing has been around for a while, I mean 450 00:29:38.710 --> 00:29:42.309 probably fifteen, twenty years now. But I think what people are not understanding 451 00:29:42.430 --> 00:29:47.349 is that the the technology has advanced to the point where you can actually do 452 00:29:48.069 --> 00:29:52.710 very large scale digital printing now. That would kind of be closer to what 453 00:29:52.859 --> 00:29:56.619 could only be done with offset in the past. And the way I kind 454 00:29:56.660 --> 00:29:59.380 of kind of illustrate that, and let's let's say that you're a small to 455 00:29:59.539 --> 00:30:03.339 midsize school and you're you're sending out view books and sending out these different things. 456 00:30:04.019 --> 00:30:07.410 You can actually now start to look at a ways to leverage digital printing 457 00:30:07.450 --> 00:30:12.410 in a way that you could, in theory, put together a individualized version 458 00:30:12.450 --> 00:30:17.089 of view book per student. You could actually set that up and be able 459 00:30:17.089 --> 00:30:19.289 to drop in different photos. If they vindicated they're interested in Lacrosse or they're 460 00:30:19.329 --> 00:30:23.480 interested in the stem programs, those could be photos that get dropped in with 461 00:30:23.559 --> 00:30:27.680 data variable and I think that kind of opens up some excitement to the idea 462 00:30:27.759 --> 00:30:32.960 that if we're going to be sending out these view books based on individuals, 463 00:30:32.960 --> 00:30:37.869 or, let's say we're sending out a travel piece, those the ability to 464 00:30:37.950 --> 00:30:41.670 version and individualize those down to the level of the of the individual that's interested 465 00:30:42.430 --> 00:30:45.309 is very powerful and it's something that I think that a lot of people don't 466 00:30:45.470 --> 00:30:48.910 understand or realize that, you know, we can even do that beyond just 467 00:30:49.019 --> 00:30:52.180 the standard postcards that have done been done in the past, and so I 468 00:30:52.299 --> 00:30:56.140 just want to kind of open people's mind up to think through the fact that 469 00:30:56.259 --> 00:30:59.019 there's a lot of ways and a lot of creative ways that we can look 470 00:30:59.019 --> 00:31:04.410 at personalization and versioning that might be beyond Troy's example earlier where hey, let's 471 00:31:04.410 --> 00:31:07.329 put their name in a fancy font really big and hope they it gets their 472 00:31:07.369 --> 00:31:14.730 attention. I'm really excited about the ways these types of tools can open up 473 00:31:14.809 --> 00:31:18.119 a lot more opportunities. Well said, Bart and thanks to the three of 474 00:31:18.200 --> 00:31:23.799 you for a very enlightening conversation. If you want to find more information about 475 00:31:23.880 --> 00:31:27.720 this, you can simply google it. Of course. If you go to 476 00:31:29.240 --> 00:31:33.670 Kaylor Solutionscom, that takes you to Barts team, or you can go to 477 00:31:34.029 --> 00:31:41.390 think patentedcom and you can get more information about the tools that we utilize to 478 00:31:41.549 --> 00:31:47.619 help colleges and universities. The Higher Ed Marketer podcast is sponsored by Kaylor solutions 479 00:31:47.779 --> 00:31:52.299 and education marketing and branding agency and by thing patented, a marketing, execution, 480 00:31:52.420 --> 00:31:57.420 printing and mailing provider of higher et solutions. On behalf of my cohost 481 00:31:57.579 --> 00:32:06.569 Bart Kaylor, I'm troy singer. Thanks for joining us. You've been listening 482 00:32:06.650 --> 00:32:09.369 to the Higher Ed Marketer. To ensure that you never miss an episode, 483 00:32:09.650 --> 00:32:15.210 subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you're listening with apple 484 00:32:15.250 --> 00:32:17.319 PODCASTS, we'd love for you to leave a quick rating of the show. 485 00:32:17.319 --> 00:32:22.400 Simply tap the number of stars you think the podcast deserves. Until next time, 486 -->