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Sept. 14, 2021

Message Creation w/ the Caylor Solutions Team

Message Creation w/ the Caylor Solutions Team

How do you create upwards of 150 pieces of deliverables for a traditional undergrad campaign designed for enrollment that ranges from direct mail to automation?

We wanted to show you behind the curtain, so to speak, at Caylor Solutions by highlighting the leadership team after their stellar accomplishment on a huge, multifaceted project.

In this roundtable discussion episode, we chat with Caylor’s Matt Bloom , Content Director and Strategist, Jenni Roberts , Creative Director, and Jessi Robbins , Project Manager.

Join us as we discuss:

- Focusing on client victories during the discovery phase

- The AIDA framework: attraction, interest, desire, action

- Creating uniform messaging that is also personal

- How automation is like a magic trick

- Our top takeaways after the execution of the project

Check out this related episode:

Episode 5 w/ Kristi Lafree at Butler 

To hear more interviews like this one, subscribe to Higher Ed Marketer on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or your preferred podcast platform. 

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The Higher Ed Marketer podcast is sponsored by Caylor Solutions, an Education Marketing and Branding Agency, and by Think Patented, a Marketing Execution, Printing and Mailing provider of Higher Ed solutions.

    

 

Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:02.879 --> 00:00:07.190 You are listening to the Higher Ed Marketer, a podcast geared towards marketing professionals 2 00:00:07.230 --> 00:00:11.910 in higher education. This show will tackle all sorts of questions related to student 3 00:00:11.949 --> 00:00:16.230 recruitment, don'tor relations, marketing trends, new technologies and so much more. 4 00:00:16.989 --> 00:00:20.789 If you are looking for conversations centered around where the industry is going, this 5 00:00:20.989 --> 00:00:30.300 podcast is for you. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the Higher 6 00:00:30.300 --> 00:00:36.009 Ed Marketer Podcast, where weekly we interview higher read marketers that we like and 7 00:00:36.250 --> 00:00:41.689 admire, and that holds to today because I get to interview my colleague and 8 00:00:41.890 --> 00:00:46.250 Co host, Bark Taylor, and his leadership team. A couple of weeks 9 00:00:46.250 --> 00:00:49.810 ago, if you listen to the episode, we interviewed our team at thing 10 00:00:49.890 --> 00:00:56.240 patented and we went over the execution side of a OPTI channel marketing campaign. 11 00:00:56.679 --> 00:01:00.880 This week we're going to talk about the messaging and also the creative and what 12 00:01:00.039 --> 00:01:04.189 goes in on the front end on one of those campaigns. Mart yeah, 13 00:01:04.189 --> 00:01:07.310 I'm really excited to talk to the team. We've got Jenny Roberts, who's 14 00:01:07.310 --> 00:01:11.549 our creative director, Matt Bloom, who's our content director, and strategists, 15 00:01:11.590 --> 00:01:15.150 and then Jesse Robbins, who's our project manager and kind of maintains a lot 16 00:01:15.189 --> 00:01:19.180 of this. And we're talking about the same search campaign, you know, 17 00:01:19.500 --> 00:01:23.700 purchase name list, that we talked about with the think patented team. And 18 00:01:23.819 --> 00:01:27.019 again, and in full transparency, it's early in the process, so we're 19 00:01:27.019 --> 00:01:30.980 not etioning any names. This isn't necessarily case study, it's kind of a 20 00:01:32.060 --> 00:01:34.930 best practice is conversation, and so we really wanted to just take some time 21 00:01:36.049 --> 00:01:40.290 to kind of talk through how we approach a project like this from a creative 22 00:01:40.329 --> 00:01:44.409 standpoint, from a messaging standpoint and and what it takes. And at the 23 00:01:44.489 --> 00:01:47.879 end you'll kind of get five takeaways that I think that you can use in 24 00:01:48.000 --> 00:01:52.400 any of your marketing at tactics and things that you're doing at your school. 25 00:01:52.840 --> 00:01:55.760 But I guess without any further Ado, I'm ready to kind of gets bring 26 00:01:55.799 --> 00:02:01.750 our team in. Very good here's the kylo solutions leadership team. It is 27 00:02:01.870 --> 00:02:09.270 my pleasure to welcome into the PODCAST recording studio the leadership of the Kaylor solutions 28 00:02:09.349 --> 00:02:14.710 team, Jesse, Jenny and Matt. Hello all of you. Hey, 29 00:02:14.789 --> 00:02:19.460 Triano, we are going to learn a little bit more about the Kaylor's side 30 00:02:19.580 --> 00:02:23.620 of the projects that think patent did and Kaylor work on a couple of weeks 31 00:02:23.620 --> 00:02:28.379 ago. If you've listened to the PODCAST, we talked about delivering of the 32 00:02:28.419 --> 00:02:32.090 message and the execution of the message. Today we get to learn about the 33 00:02:32.210 --> 00:02:37.689 creation and the thought that goes behind it and what happens up until the execution 34 00:02:37.849 --> 00:02:40.610 side. So before we begin, will love to meet each and every one 35 00:02:40.650 --> 00:02:44.719 of you, starting off with Jesse, if you could tell us a little 36 00:02:44.719 --> 00:02:49.240 bit about yourself, your role and where you're located in this world. Thanks, 37 00:02:49.360 --> 00:02:53.120 Troy. Yes, I'm Jesse Robbins. I have been working with Taylor 38 00:02:53.280 --> 00:02:58.199 for the past few years, I think as a tragic manager, so that 39 00:02:58.479 --> 00:03:02.270 just means that I am the main point of contact between our clients and our 40 00:03:02.349 --> 00:03:08.150 internal team and I have the pleasure of working on schedules and timelines and budgets, 41 00:03:08.270 --> 00:03:12.270 things like that, just to make sure we stay on trek on our 42 00:03:12.349 --> 00:03:15.539 side and to make sure the client is satisfied at the end. I've loved 43 00:03:15.740 --> 00:03:17.819 getting to work with Kayla the past few years and I'm actually I'm based in 44 00:03:17.939 --> 00:03:23.979 Indianapolis, but soon to be Greenville, South Carolina, lucky you, and 45 00:03:23.539 --> 00:03:25.900 just use the one I get to work with the most. As we go 46 00:03:27.020 --> 00:03:30.210 through the project. So it's great to have a conversation formally about the projects 47 00:03:30.289 --> 00:03:34.610 we do. Jenny, you're next. All right, thanks, Tory. 48 00:03:35.129 --> 00:03:40.639 I am Jenny Roberts and I am the creative director at Kaylor solutions and I 49 00:03:40.759 --> 00:03:44.960 always say, in an effort not to date myself, I won't say how 50 00:03:45.039 --> 00:03:47.520 long Bart and I have worked together, but I will say that I have 51 00:03:47.719 --> 00:03:53.439 worked with Bart since the inception of Kaylor solutions and I've had a great pleasure 52 00:03:53.680 --> 00:04:00.629 and growing in that role and watching Kaylor grow over the years and I just 53 00:04:00.789 --> 00:04:04.030 really enjoy working with this team and the clients that we work with. started 54 00:04:04.150 --> 00:04:10.860 out as a graphic designer and really focused on the visual aspect of marketing and 55 00:04:10.939 --> 00:04:15.419 communications, but over the years really just fell in love with brand storytelling and 56 00:04:15.659 --> 00:04:18.500 not allowed me to grow into this position. So I'm thankful for it and 57 00:04:18.579 --> 00:04:21.819 happy to be here today. Thank you, Jenny, and yes, we 58 00:04:21.899 --> 00:04:28.930 all know that Bart has a big fan club. Were you located, by 59 00:04:29.009 --> 00:04:32.170 the way? I am actually in Hill head, South Carolina, but Bart 60 00:04:32.209 --> 00:04:35.730 and I work together for many years back in Indianapolis, so we always kind 61 00:04:35.769 --> 00:04:41.279 of go back to our midwest roots here at Taylor Solutions. Yep, thank 62 00:04:41.360 --> 00:04:46.680 you, Jenny. And Lastman not least, Matt. Yeah, thanks, 63 00:04:46.759 --> 00:04:50.639 Troy. I am Matt Bloom. I'm a content writer and strategist for killer 64 00:04:50.720 --> 00:04:57.550 solutions and I am coming to you from Fort Worth, Texas, although I've 65 00:04:57.589 --> 00:05:00.870 I've been living here for the last couple of years from Indiana, central India, 66 00:05:00.910 --> 00:05:05.990 and in fact, a few years back I was working for Indiana public 67 00:05:06.029 --> 00:05:11.500 radio and Muncie Indiana, and so being on this podcast a day it reminds 68 00:05:11.540 --> 00:05:15.420 me of my public media roots. That's fine, that is great. And 69 00:05:15.699 --> 00:05:21.250 you know, I just thought that we meet via zoom and it just doesn't 70 00:05:21.290 --> 00:05:25.649 down on me that this team as across the country, which I think is 71 00:05:25.730 --> 00:05:29.810 wonderful, and I think it's to Bart's credit that he taps into relationships, 72 00:05:29.889 --> 00:05:34.009 keeps them and can do that across the country and deliver a great product. 73 00:05:34.529 --> 00:05:38.839 So I think it's time for me to back out of this conversation a little 74 00:05:38.839 --> 00:05:41.120 bit and turn it over to Bart. And Bart, if you can lead 75 00:05:41.160 --> 00:05:46.360 us through a discussion and help people understand the messaging in the creative side of 76 00:05:46.399 --> 00:05:49.509 the projects that we do together or that you do with other clients. Yeah, 77 00:05:49.670 --> 00:05:53.550 thanks, thanks troy, and thanks Jim for being a part of this. 78 00:05:54.069 --> 00:05:56.430 You know, it's such a great thing to kind of have this conversation 79 00:05:56.550 --> 00:05:59.509 together and to be together. We do a lot of things like this. 80 00:06:00.029 --> 00:06:01.790 Zoom is kind of our friend and I tell a lot of people we've been 81 00:06:01.790 --> 00:06:05.740 using zoom before it was cool, you know, last five years, just 82 00:06:05.819 --> 00:06:09.620 because that's the way Kayli solutions works. Were Virtual Agency, and so we've 83 00:06:09.620 --> 00:06:13.540 got team members all around the country and nearly all around the world to we've 84 00:06:13.540 --> 00:06:15.939 got several international team members. So it's a pleasure to kind of all be 85 00:06:16.060 --> 00:06:19.810 together to kind of have this conversation about some of the projects and we're kind 86 00:06:19.850 --> 00:06:24.250 of talking specifically about one project that we've been working on that we've been pretty 87 00:06:24.250 --> 00:06:28.449 proud of. That kind of represents a lot of other things and I think 88 00:06:28.449 --> 00:06:31.569 a lot of times when highed marketers, and the subject of this podcast is 89 00:06:31.569 --> 00:06:36.680 hired marketing and and all of us within the in the industry of marketing understand 90 00:06:36.720 --> 00:06:39.920 that it's pretty pretty diverse. There's a lot of things that you can do 91 00:06:40.040 --> 00:06:43.399 with marketing and a lot of ways that it can be branded and messaged and 92 00:06:43.560 --> 00:06:48.870 executed, and I think sometimes the challenge is recognizing just how in depth. 93 00:06:48.990 --> 00:06:51.870 Sometimes it can be. And and I think the search campaign that we're doing 94 00:06:51.949 --> 00:06:58.470 right now for a medium size school that we've you know, and all transparency, 95 00:06:58.550 --> 00:07:02.100 been trans been working with think patented in Troy on that and again we 96 00:07:02.180 --> 00:07:04.939 thought it would be fun for an episode or two just to kind of pull 97 00:07:04.980 --> 00:07:09.500 back the curtain and kind of talk about our own processes and maybe our audience 98 00:07:09.579 --> 00:07:12.620 can learn from that. But I think it'd be worth just kind of starting 99 00:07:12.620 --> 00:07:15.610 a conversation a little bit about when we start these campaigns and we start these 100 00:07:15.649 --> 00:07:19.290 these projects, it's not just a matter of a couple postcards and a couple 101 00:07:19.449 --> 00:07:23.850 email templates. I mean it's a lot more and I think troy, you 102 00:07:23.930 --> 00:07:26.850 did a great job a couple weeks ago talking to Dan and Sean from think 103 00:07:26.889 --> 00:07:30.519 patent about really leaning into omnichannel marketing and all the different ways that we can 104 00:07:30.560 --> 00:07:35.079 do that. And so I guess I'll open it up first with with Jenny. 105 00:07:35.439 --> 00:07:39.480 I think that you know, you and I have worked on several projects 106 00:07:39.480 --> 00:07:42.800 across the years and we've done a lot of different things. I I think 107 00:07:42.879 --> 00:07:46.389 this might be one of the larger projects that we've kind of accomplished together. 108 00:07:46.069 --> 00:07:49.550 Maybe talk a little bit about how you approach a project like this that is 109 00:07:50.430 --> 00:07:56.709 so multifaceted and maybe even just kind of back up and just for a second 110 00:07:56.790 --> 00:08:01.019 tell us about how multifaceted it was. Oh Gosh, well, this project. 111 00:08:01.100 --> 00:08:03.620 I mean I think one thing that I can say about it and that 112 00:08:03.740 --> 00:08:07.779 if you do look at it, at it kind of where we ended up 113 00:08:07.899 --> 00:08:11.060 and just the amount of materials that were great created in the amount of people 114 00:08:11.220 --> 00:08:15.850 that came together to bring this to fruition, it could be a little bit 115 00:08:15.889 --> 00:08:20.610 overwhelming. But I think one thing that we have discovered over the years with 116 00:08:20.810 --> 00:08:26.370 Taylor solutions is to get started and to really get to know our clients is 117 00:08:26.730 --> 00:08:31.920 really the fundamental and foundational aspect of how we do what we do, and 118 00:08:31.159 --> 00:08:35.480 so, even though this was a bigger project, we really started it and 119 00:08:35.600 --> 00:08:41.279 approached it in the same way, and that always starts with getting to know 120 00:08:41.399 --> 00:08:48.470 our client, with the discovery meeting, and in this instance those discovery meetings 121 00:08:48.590 --> 00:08:52.990 kind of grew and grew because what we want to ensure that we're doing is 122 00:08:52.110 --> 00:08:58.820 not reinventing the wheel for anyone. We want to really highlight brand strengths and 123 00:08:58.100 --> 00:09:05.220 come along with our clients for the ride and really invite them to kind of 124 00:09:05.340 --> 00:09:09.500 celebrate their victories and then we hone in on those victories, no matter, 125 00:09:09.820 --> 00:09:13.330 you know, small project or big project, to meet those communication goals. 126 00:09:13.649 --> 00:09:20.809 So and this instance we started that exact same way and kind of reiterated back 127 00:09:20.929 --> 00:09:26.080 to the client what we heard was successful with their messaging and marketing and put 128 00:09:26.240 --> 00:09:35.679 together a strategic campaign proposal that then drilled that down into some audience segments based 129 00:09:35.799 --> 00:09:41.750 upon their perspective students. So I would say that was kind of a foundation 130 00:09:41.269 --> 00:09:46.909 for creative development. But I think Matt could really speak to then how, 131 00:09:46.509 --> 00:09:54.500 once we had those audiences identified, how we were able to take a cohesive 132 00:09:54.620 --> 00:10:00.059 message, highlight their brand and differentiate a little bit depending on who we were 133 00:10:00.100 --> 00:10:01.860 talking to. Yeah, and I just want to clarify for a moment for 134 00:10:01.899 --> 00:10:07.769 everyone that we're talking about a traditional undergrad search campaign and sometimes people get confused 135 00:10:07.809 --> 00:10:13.690 with search searches kind of a industry historical term for purchase lists. I mean 136 00:10:13.769 --> 00:10:18.009 to be kind of a little bit more of the way that works in typical 137 00:10:18.250 --> 00:10:22.600 marketing circles is that you buy a list of perspective students. In this particular 138 00:10:22.720 --> 00:10:26.600 instance we purchased about fifty five thousand names, but I think that it's important 139 00:10:26.600 --> 00:10:31.639 to kind of understand that we're talking about a traditional undergrad campaign designed for enrollment, 140 00:10:31.840 --> 00:10:33.519 and so, mad I'll let you kind of take it from there. 141 00:10:33.159 --> 00:10:39.389 Yeah, and the way that I tend to think about the sort of the 142 00:10:39.470 --> 00:10:46.190 prospect journey is using the the Aida framework, Aida attraction, interest, desire 143 00:10:46.230 --> 00:10:52.259 action. It is in some cases a little bit of an an oversimplification. 144 00:10:52.460 --> 00:10:56.940 You know, it's not always a perfect straight line that the prospect goes through. 145 00:10:56.139 --> 00:11:00.700 In fact, often times, you know, you can attract them with 146 00:11:00.980 --> 00:11:05.009 some advertising or something that that gets them into the into your communication flow, 147 00:11:05.610 --> 00:11:11.210 and they might spend a whole lot of time bouncing back and forth between learning 148 00:11:11.250 --> 00:11:16.169 about your institution, that is the interest phase, and then building desire to 149 00:11:16.289 --> 00:11:20.879 take action. And then maybe something happens in their life and they're not quite 150 00:11:20.919 --> 00:11:22.919 ready yet and and you know, then they're they're bouncing back to interest and 151 00:11:22.960 --> 00:11:28.080 they might sort of you know, not not to go and quite a perfectly 152 00:11:28.240 --> 00:11:35.309 linear pattern there. But basically what we're trying to do is move them systematically 153 00:11:35.470 --> 00:11:39.509 through these different stages. And so from a from a content running standpoint, 154 00:11:39.590 --> 00:11:43.629 that means that you're not going to talk to somebody who is, you know, 155 00:11:43.990 --> 00:11:48.340 just learning about up your institution for the very first time the same way 156 00:11:48.379 --> 00:11:52.340 that you're talking with somebody who has already expressed interest. You know, you 157 00:11:52.659 --> 00:11:58.379 don't treat somebody who has come to be a friend of yours the same way 158 00:11:58.379 --> 00:12:05.450 that you would treat a stranger. And so the overall strategy is fairly straightforward. 159 00:12:05.490 --> 00:12:13.970 But then executing it and incorporating personalization into automation, that's where it starts 160 00:12:13.009 --> 00:12:18.159 to get a little bord tricky. You've got these these different, you know, 161 00:12:18.279 --> 00:12:24.639 personas that that Jenny was talking about, these groups of prospective students who 162 00:12:24.679 --> 00:12:31.789 are interested in different things and you want to deliver the the right piece of 163 00:12:31.909 --> 00:12:35.950 information to each one of them. You know, we've got different sources of 164 00:12:37.070 --> 00:12:39.789 information that we can work from. With a purchase list. You know, 165 00:12:39.870 --> 00:12:43.580 you've got a little bit of Info. You know you know maybe where they 166 00:12:43.620 --> 00:12:48.019 are geographically, you maybe know what high school they're coming from. You know 167 00:12:48.139 --> 00:12:54.980 some pieces they're what you really want is information that that you know is is 168 00:12:56.019 --> 00:13:00.490 up to date and that the best information is what they're giving you directly. 169 00:13:01.289 --> 00:13:05.250 So that's why, for this campaign, we created an interactive landing page we 170 00:13:05.370 --> 00:13:09.889 put together. Basically it's a quiz. It's just asking a few questions and 171 00:13:11.490 --> 00:13:15.600 in Troy and Bard, I know you guys talked about this in that that 172 00:13:16.279 --> 00:13:22.759 episode podcast recently, where you are you're asking them just sort of some fun 173 00:13:22.840 --> 00:13:26.519 facts about themselves. You know what's your what's your favorite food, what your 174 00:13:26.519 --> 00:13:31.190 favorite color? But you're also asking some some substantive questions to you know, 175 00:13:31.309 --> 00:13:37.190 you're getting into what their favorite activities were in in high school. You're getting 176 00:13:37.230 --> 00:13:39.070 into, you know, what they want to do for a living with they're 177 00:13:39.110 --> 00:13:46.220 thinking about career wise, all of that information is is gold because they're talking 178 00:13:46.379 --> 00:13:50.460 with us. But then in automation you need to make sure that you're talking 179 00:13:50.620 --> 00:13:54.460 back in a way that makes sense. So a big part of the the 180 00:13:54.820 --> 00:14:01.090 difficulty here was in determining what's the underlying logic that we're going to use. 181 00:14:01.210 --> 00:14:03.450 And I promise I won't go into too much in the weeds about this, 182 00:14:05.850 --> 00:14:09.730 but I'll just I'll just do it by telling a little bit to say that 183 00:14:09.200 --> 00:14:13.879 with automation you can't just ask open ended questions. You can't just say, 184 00:14:15.519 --> 00:14:18.440 Hey, you know, what was your favorite extra curricular activity in high school, 185 00:14:20.039 --> 00:14:22.919 because they could put anything in that that space. They might put archery 186 00:14:24.240 --> 00:14:28.149 and maybe your school doesn't offer that. So you don't have an answer to 187 00:14:28.309 --> 00:14:33.710 that preloaded. Now, if a human is going to respond, then they 188 00:14:33.750 --> 00:14:35.429 could say, well, you know, we don't have archery, but we 189 00:14:35.509 --> 00:14:39.899 have this. But in automation you have to plan ahead for for what those 190 00:14:39.980 --> 00:14:45.899 responses are going to be after sort of limit the parameters there and because you 191 00:14:45.980 --> 00:14:50.100 have to, on the other end you've got all this content loaded up that 192 00:14:50.500 --> 00:14:56.889 is keyed into those responses. So, long story short, we we use 193 00:14:56.929 --> 00:15:01.529 a lot of spreadsheets to figure out, you know, here's here are the 194 00:15:01.649 --> 00:15:05.210 the possible responses they can give us. Here's what we're going to say. 195 00:15:05.330 --> 00:15:07.360 If, you know, if they have response A, we're going to come 196 00:15:07.440 --> 00:15:13.480 back with with x and there's there's a lot of work that goes into organizing 197 00:15:13.519 --> 00:15:18.399 all that in fig and making sure that you're producing a cohesive message that's personalized 198 00:15:18.440 --> 00:15:22.549 their interests, and I think that's important too. Matt. I just want 199 00:15:22.549 --> 00:15:26.029 to point out the fact that by doing that, two things happen. One, 200 00:15:26.110 --> 00:15:31.070 the student feels heard and they they feel like the school knows them, 201 00:15:31.149 --> 00:15:35.669 gets to know them, and that's I think that's certainly something in generation Z 202 00:15:35.899 --> 00:15:39.620 that a lot of research has been done. As a generation Z especially once 203 00:15:39.740 --> 00:15:41.620 to kind of have that personal interaction. They want to be known, they 204 00:15:41.700 --> 00:15:46.740 want to have their, you know, their opinion heard, and so when 205 00:15:46.740 --> 00:15:50.490 you're talking to fifty fivezero people, that's hard to do in a personal relationship. 206 00:15:50.490 --> 00:15:52.370 And so what we're trying to do through automation and through a lot of 207 00:15:52.409 --> 00:16:00.649 the things that troy's helping us with is to create that sense of personalization and 208 00:16:00.769 --> 00:16:06.000 a sense of being heard and a sense of all of that and then utilizing 209 00:16:06.039 --> 00:16:10.759 these different tools to be able to achieve that so that when they do engage 210 00:16:10.799 --> 00:16:14.399 with a real human being, there's already been a relationship that's been created, 211 00:16:14.960 --> 00:16:18.440 and I think it's it's important too, because I think even even that some 212 00:16:18.590 --> 00:16:21.710 of the parent colmflow that we did in part of as part of this program, 213 00:16:22.230 --> 00:16:26.549 we were taking some of those facts that we learned about about the students 214 00:16:26.629 --> 00:16:30.389 and we were reflecting those back to the parents to say, Hey, isn't 215 00:16:30.389 --> 00:16:34.059 it cool that junior likes to eat chips and listen to country music when when 216 00:16:34.139 --> 00:16:37.980 they study, who would have thought? Well, that creates an dialog opportunity 217 00:16:38.019 --> 00:16:42.980 for parent and Child, parent and prospective student that they aren't getting maybe through 218 00:16:44.139 --> 00:16:48.929 some other outreaches from some other schools that are just historically just put pumping out 219 00:16:48.450 --> 00:16:53.129 all the postcards kind of generalized to everybody, all the emails that are kind 220 00:16:53.129 --> 00:16:57.929 of generalized everybody. We really wanted to avoid that, that noise and really 221 00:16:57.929 --> 00:17:03.119 kind of being a lot more focused and a lot more relevant to the prospective 222 00:17:03.160 --> 00:17:06.920 students and parents and I think that, as you said, Matt, we 223 00:17:07.480 --> 00:17:11.519 we kind of ended up really liking spreadsheets, which sounds crazy for creatives, 224 00:17:11.000 --> 00:17:15.470 but I know Jesse really like spreadsheets because that's she's the one who keeps us 225 00:17:15.509 --> 00:17:18.069 all organized. Jesse, tell us a little bit about what that was like. 226 00:17:18.390 --> 00:17:22.109 Is, as Matt and Jenny and the other parts of the team started 227 00:17:22.150 --> 00:17:25.990 pulling together these different you know, these different trails that we needed to keep 228 00:17:26.029 --> 00:17:27.190 track of. How did you do that? How did you keep track of 229 00:17:27.269 --> 00:17:33.980 that? Well, it became it quickly became clear at the beginning of the 230 00:17:33.059 --> 00:17:37.380 project that it wasn't going to be we weren't going to be able to follow 231 00:17:37.940 --> 00:17:44.529 one of our typical processes that we follow where we just create deliverable send them 232 00:17:44.529 --> 00:17:47.809 over to the client. I had a special position where I got to work 233 00:17:47.809 --> 00:17:52.569 very closely with the client, very closely with our internal team and very closely 234 00:17:52.730 --> 00:17:56.650 with the think patented and Bit Storm Team, and so that information not only 235 00:17:56.730 --> 00:18:00.119 had to be delivered clearly to the client, but it really had to be 236 00:18:00.400 --> 00:18:07.079 delivered and translated across all of our different in a way that everyone understood. 237 00:18:07.359 --> 00:18:12.029 So yeah, I quickly. I was just I remember sitting at my desk 238 00:18:12.069 --> 00:18:18.910 and thinking, how are we going to deliver what became up boards of a 239 00:18:18.990 --> 00:18:23.150 Hundred Fifty Pieces of deliverables? How how can we deliver that in a way 240 00:18:23.150 --> 00:18:30.140 that's clear and then can be then translated into the enrollment campaign? And so 241 00:18:30.299 --> 00:18:34.380 we did. At the very beginning we started a mass spreadsheet based off of 242 00:18:34.460 --> 00:18:40.339 our strategy, because I think that, I mean I rely very closely on 243 00:18:40.619 --> 00:18:44.769 our strategists and Jenny and Matt's brains to really set the direction. And so 244 00:18:44.930 --> 00:18:48.730 we they put together the strategy and off of that we put together a spreadsheet 245 00:18:48.730 --> 00:18:52.250 that laid out every single deliverable that we would have, including all of those 246 00:18:52.410 --> 00:18:57.400 variations in those customizations. That we were able to do because of think patented's 247 00:18:57.480 --> 00:19:02.559 partnership so if they said they wanted to be a math major, we were 248 00:19:02.880 --> 00:19:07.160 able to include those details in that deliverable spreadsheet so that it was clear not 249 00:19:07.279 --> 00:19:10.509 only to the apple team, for our internal team, but then also to 250 00:19:10.670 --> 00:19:12.910 think pended when they did the execution, what we wanted it to say. 251 00:19:14.069 --> 00:19:18.750 So it was the spreadsheets were our friends, that's for sure, but it 252 00:19:18.029 --> 00:19:23.420 keeping it and we also came up with, quite honestly, some codes so 253 00:19:23.660 --> 00:19:29.779 that it wasn't here's direct mail piece that says x, Y and Z. 254 00:19:30.099 --> 00:19:34.660 We came up with a coded system. This is senior piece, one direct 255 00:19:34.779 --> 00:19:38.490 mail. We had a whole algorithm to it that we used and so that 256 00:19:38.569 --> 00:19:44.529 became common knowledge across the Kaylor. Think pad that in the clients team. 257 00:19:45.089 --> 00:19:48.690 Yeah, that's great. I think that. I think that's so important. 258 00:19:48.730 --> 00:19:52.279 At that all of that kind of got organized and and when you talk about 259 00:19:52.279 --> 00:19:56.680 a hundred fifty pieces, we were talking prior to the recording that that might 260 00:19:56.720 --> 00:19:59.759 actually be a little low. Just for the audience to understand them. I 261 00:19:59.839 --> 00:20:02.599 we did a we did a senior flow, a junior flow, a sophomore 262 00:20:02.640 --> 00:20:04.920 flow. Then we also had a parent flow involved in that. That kind 263 00:20:04.960 --> 00:20:08.990 of was a sophomore junior, senior parent flow. Then, on top of 264 00:20:10.069 --> 00:20:14.109 that, there were variations depending on the quiz answers, depending on what they 265 00:20:15.029 --> 00:20:17.789 what they did, their actions that they did, whether they filled an rfi 266 00:20:17.829 --> 00:20:19.910 out, whether they filled out the quiz, whether they ended up, you 267 00:20:19.990 --> 00:20:25.700 know, and participating in a madlibs type of type of activity, depending if 268 00:20:25.700 --> 00:20:29.579 they opened certain emails, if they landed on certain landing pages. Then it 269 00:20:29.700 --> 00:20:32.819 went to you know, there was direct mail, there was email, there 270 00:20:32.980 --> 00:20:37.289 was templates for letters, print material hills, there was a journal that went 271 00:20:37.329 --> 00:20:41.210 out customized based on their answers, and then we even got into things like 272 00:20:41.450 --> 00:20:47.210 text messaging, ringless voicemail and some other technologies around social match and paper click 273 00:20:47.329 --> 00:20:51.160 that went out with the entire mailing program so when, Jesse, when you 274 00:20:51.200 --> 00:20:53.680 say a hundred fifty items, I'm beginning to think that it might have even 275 00:20:53.680 --> 00:20:57.440 been more than that and that I think that coding that you talked about was 276 00:20:57.519 --> 00:21:02.839 so critical. Definitely felt like more than I did, and that coding that 277 00:21:02.880 --> 00:21:04.549 you talked about was so critical because when we, you know, we had 278 00:21:04.589 --> 00:21:08.269 our our designers that were working on these different pieces and we had to have 279 00:21:08.750 --> 00:21:12.910 the client approving all of these messaging I mean, you know, Matt, 280 00:21:14.069 --> 00:21:18.619 Matt and his team are writing variations of, you know, letters depending on 281 00:21:18.339 --> 00:21:22.539 what the you know, that second piece of variable content on if they chose 282 00:21:22.619 --> 00:21:26.099 this particular set of majors. And we're going to talk about this type of 283 00:21:26.099 --> 00:21:30.180 outcome. There's a lot of moving parts, ton of moving parts, and 284 00:21:30.259 --> 00:21:34.170 I think that goes back again to the fact that doing this without, you 285 00:21:34.250 --> 00:21:38.289 know, understanding the complexity of it. That's why I think that so many 286 00:21:38.329 --> 00:21:41.329 times, and you all can kind of chime in if you think that's why 287 00:21:41.329 --> 00:21:47.680 I think so many times schools end up only being as successful as they might 288 00:21:47.960 --> 00:21:52.160 in these outreach campaigns because it takes a lot of work to get to the 289 00:21:52.240 --> 00:21:56.720 level that it's going to be effective and I think that we all in high 290 00:21:56.799 --> 00:22:00.119 at marketing know the challenge and any of us who've had kids in the last 291 00:22:00.119 --> 00:22:04.869 few years that are of age of in the college selection and process, we 292 00:22:06.029 --> 00:22:07.670 know that. You know, you get home from work and there's maybe five 293 00:22:07.829 --> 00:22:12.549 six pieces of mail on the counter from all these schools that are prospecting our 294 00:22:14.309 --> 00:22:17.140 children. And part of it, I think, and I guess I'd like 295 00:22:17.180 --> 00:22:19.299 to kind of talk about this too, is what are some of the things 296 00:22:19.339 --> 00:22:22.740 that we do that that really kind of get the attention, you know, 297 00:22:22.940 --> 00:22:26.819 not only of of the the prospective students, but of mom and dad, 298 00:22:26.900 --> 00:22:30.930 because at the end of the day, all the research shows that mom's the 299 00:22:30.049 --> 00:22:36.410 number one influencer for college selection and and even you know, if people go 300 00:22:36.529 --> 00:22:41.049 back and listen to the episode with Christy Laffree at Butler University, that comflow 301 00:22:41.170 --> 00:22:45.799 was such a big critical part of our personal experience and and so I don't 302 00:22:45.799 --> 00:22:48.680 know a sybody have any thoughts on that, on just the idea of what 303 00:22:48.880 --> 00:22:52.759 that means to kind of get that attention of the parents and the perspective students 304 00:22:52.799 --> 00:22:56.359 early on. Sure I can speak to that a little bit. Matt you 305 00:22:56.599 --> 00:23:02.950 said something earlier that I think is really important to highlight. That relates back 306 00:23:03.230 --> 00:23:07.710 to what I said at the beginning and and that coincides with really ensuring that 307 00:23:07.789 --> 00:23:11.109 we're listening to our clients and we're aligning with them. So on this particular 308 00:23:11.349 --> 00:23:17.539 project, some of those quizzes and some of those questions that were being asked, 309 00:23:17.740 --> 00:23:21.259 some people might say, how is that relevant? What does that have 310 00:23:21.500 --> 00:23:26.769 to do with my child's experience? And for this particular client, we knew 311 00:23:27.250 --> 00:23:36.130 that their admissions team was greatly IMP actful in making a personal connection and relationship 312 00:23:36.210 --> 00:23:40.049 with respective perspective students. And one thing that they pointed out as a lot 313 00:23:40.089 --> 00:23:45.440 of times, if they can get that perspective student on campus, that kind 314 00:23:45.480 --> 00:23:48.960 of seals the deal and it's, you know, it's the beginning of that 315 00:23:48.160 --> 00:23:53.920 relationship. It's very personal and that is something that continues throughout the duration of 316 00:23:53.960 --> 00:24:00.470 their experience on campus. And so with this campaign specifically, our goal was 317 00:24:00.589 --> 00:24:07.549 to figure out how can we bring that same level of attention and care to 318 00:24:07.710 --> 00:24:12.220 these campaign materials, so really being personal and, you know, Oh, 319 00:24:12.420 --> 00:24:17.019 not conversational but, you know, not up tight at the same time, 320 00:24:17.140 --> 00:24:21.539 like it was about relationship building and I think in terms of all of the 321 00:24:21.660 --> 00:24:25.009 different com flows that were done, you know, we started with Sophomore, 322 00:24:25.690 --> 00:24:30.009 went to junior, went to senior. Obviously, at those different stages of 323 00:24:30.730 --> 00:24:37.170 initial investigation, the level of interest and just the time devoted to even college 324 00:24:37.210 --> 00:24:41.119 research is going to vary greatly, and so we wanted to kind of match 325 00:24:41.240 --> 00:24:48.400 that. So the sophomore flow was pretty basic and it was really just ensuring 326 00:24:48.680 --> 00:24:53.710 that you understand our mission envision, you understand what our goal is for you, 327 00:24:55.430 --> 00:25:00.710 your time on campus and really kind of that high level nurturing aspect, 328 00:25:00.750 --> 00:25:04.549 to just stay on the radar as as a sophomore in high school and once 329 00:25:04.630 --> 00:25:08.420 you get to that senior level, we have to make sure that the brand 330 00:25:08.579 --> 00:25:15.220 message and that messaging is consistent and cohesive, but the level of engagement is 331 00:25:15.299 --> 00:25:22.730 vastly different. So it went from broad to very specific really quickly, just 332 00:25:22.930 --> 00:25:26.490 based upon their need as a senior and, you know, anticipating that during 333 00:25:26.690 --> 00:25:33.049 that enrollment phase, the ultimate goal is to get them to apply and then 334 00:25:33.089 --> 00:25:38.079 obviously enrolled at once application is accepted. So I hope maybe that helped answer 335 00:25:38.720 --> 00:25:42.440 question now. That sounds great. I think you're I think you're exactly right. 336 00:25:42.480 --> 00:25:48.680 I think that you know that the whole notion of really connecting and building 337 00:25:48.720 --> 00:25:51.470 the relationship. I thought that was a really good comment because I think that's 338 00:25:51.509 --> 00:25:55.230 at the end of the day, above everything else, whether it's through a 339 00:25:55.309 --> 00:26:00.470 student search campaign, whether it's through Colm flow after they've applied, whether it's, 340 00:26:00.589 --> 00:26:03.630 you know, wherever it is in the in the in the journey, 341 00:26:03.190 --> 00:26:08.700 it's building that relationship, nurturing that relationship and getting that relationship to fruition. 342 00:26:08.859 --> 00:26:14.539 Of Matriculation and so and even beyond that. I mean, you know, 343 00:26:14.859 --> 00:26:18.500 studies show that if students have a good experience at college, they end up 344 00:26:18.500 --> 00:26:22.730 being donors, and donors then end up to turn into lifelong givers and then 345 00:26:22.769 --> 00:26:25.250 they turned into board members and all kinds of good things. And so, 346 00:26:25.329 --> 00:26:30.009 so much of this happens at the early stages of building the relationship. Yeah, 347 00:26:30.089 --> 00:26:33.160 just to something real quick to add to that. On this topic of 348 00:26:33.240 --> 00:26:40.119 building relationship. There are really substantive things that matter more than what I'm about 349 00:26:40.119 --> 00:26:42.000 to say. But, but, but this, this is a factor. 350 00:26:42.640 --> 00:26:49.470 When you are trying to build relationships with people through automation, there is this 351 00:26:49.869 --> 00:26:56.430 sort of fine line that you walk on the recipient. It's not like they 352 00:26:56.710 --> 00:27:02.579 don't know that you're using automation right like they don't. They don't really you're 353 00:27:02.619 --> 00:27:07.420 not trying to trick them into thinking that that you are, you know, 354 00:27:07.779 --> 00:27:12.500 setting out one to one communications for every single person. But they they still 355 00:27:12.619 --> 00:27:17.529 you still appreciate the effort. I kind of think of it in terms of 356 00:27:17.730 --> 00:27:21.170 it being almost like a magic trick. Like you, you know that the 357 00:27:21.450 --> 00:27:26.609 that the magician is doing an illusion. You know that it's not entirely real, 358 00:27:26.690 --> 00:27:30.160 but you appreciate the effort that they're putting into it and if the magician 359 00:27:30.400 --> 00:27:36.519 makes them makes a really big mistake, it just it ruins the whole illusion 360 00:27:36.839 --> 00:27:41.240 and it ruins the whole whole effect. And so before when I was talking 361 00:27:41.240 --> 00:27:44.710 about building out the the logic, one of the things that you have to 362 00:27:45.150 --> 00:27:48.789 think through is how are we going to use the the inputs that we get 363 00:27:49.069 --> 00:27:56.470 from the recipient? If they are selecting something from from a list of responses, 364 00:27:56.509 --> 00:28:00.059 are we going to have content that's coming to the next that's sort of 365 00:28:00.099 --> 00:28:03.420 fill in the blank, that says, Hey, you told us you were 366 00:28:03.460 --> 00:28:06.579 interested in film the blank. We'd like to tell you more about that. 367 00:28:07.299 --> 00:28:11.660 Well, if they get gave you a response like undecided or I don't know, 368 00:28:11.380 --> 00:28:15.130 then what's coming out is, hey, you told us you were interested 369 00:28:15.170 --> 00:28:18.529 in I don't know, or, worse, it comes out as you told 370 00:28:18.529 --> 00:28:26.680 us you were interested in null field or logic error. And so it's important 371 00:28:26.720 --> 00:28:32.559 to think through how is this going to look on the other end? How 372 00:28:32.720 --> 00:28:37.319 is this going to affect the student experience? If we are trying to get 373 00:28:37.880 --> 00:28:45.869 too tricky with this and we're and we're forgetting what the actual experiences on the 374 00:28:45.950 --> 00:28:48.269 other end, then you could end up really just shooting yourself and foot, 375 00:28:48.549 --> 00:28:52.390 and then you might as well just going back, go back to just doing 376 00:28:52.869 --> 00:28:55.940 only human responses. Yeah, well, that you know that you're doing it 377 00:28:55.980 --> 00:28:59.579 right. Yeah, that's really good point. That's a great point. I 378 00:28:59.700 --> 00:29:03.259 think this has been a great conversation. I'm excited about this and I guess 379 00:29:03.819 --> 00:29:06.779 one of the things, Troy, you and I always talked about at the 380 00:29:06.819 --> 00:29:08.180 end of the end of the shows with our guests, and it's been wonderful 381 00:29:08.220 --> 00:29:12.250 to have this conversation. We always talk about what it's one thing to kind 382 00:29:12.289 --> 00:29:15.890 of take away, and I'm going to start for my team, with with 383 00:29:17.009 --> 00:29:18.490 my opinion, and I'd like to hear everybody and tried, like you, 384 00:29:18.529 --> 00:29:22.329 to kind of way into at the end, because I think this is all 385 00:29:22.369 --> 00:29:25.640 been a team thing. But one thing, and that I've that I've heard 386 00:29:26.319 --> 00:29:29.480 that I would say as a takeaway that I would you give to somebody if 387 00:29:29.519 --> 00:29:32.160 I were to say, Hey, if there's one thing that I would encourage 388 00:29:32.200 --> 00:29:34.640 you to do when you're looking at putting together a search campaign, is keep 389 00:29:34.720 --> 00:29:38.829 in mind that it to make it successful, it has to be more than 390 00:29:38.950 --> 00:29:44.430 just you talking at people, you got to start giving them an opportunity to 391 00:29:44.589 --> 00:29:48.750 engage with you and to reflect back. And sometimes reflecting back means more than 392 00:29:48.829 --> 00:29:53.099 just the standard you know what year you graduating and what's your major, and 393 00:29:53.259 --> 00:29:56.740 you know the stuff that's going to make you feel better as a school. 394 00:29:56.220 --> 00:30:00.980 But reflect back so that you actually show some interest in these prospective students. 395 00:30:00.019 --> 00:30:03.140 And so if that's one thing that I would give to somebody is to say, 396 00:30:03.180 --> 00:30:07.089 as you engage in your marketing, make sure that you recognize it as 397 00:30:07.089 --> 00:30:11.329 a two way street rather than just a one way street of you telling go, 398 00:30:11.529 --> 00:30:15.170 start conversation. So, Jenny, I'm going to ask you to go 399 00:30:15.329 --> 00:30:19.329 next. please. Sure, and I think that's a really hard question because, 400 00:30:19.930 --> 00:30:23.480 you know, even just reflecting upon what Jesse said, this was such 401 00:30:23.480 --> 00:30:29.599 a robust project that we definitely had a lot of great takeaways. But I'm 402 00:30:29.599 --> 00:30:34.039 always going to tie it back in as the kind of the passionate one about 403 00:30:34.039 --> 00:30:38.230 branding. I think a lot of times when we get to know a new 404 00:30:38.349 --> 00:30:42.829 client and we especially start to work on a campaign, you know everybody's kind 405 00:30:42.869 --> 00:30:47.029 of always excited about this new idea, and we are. What are you 406 00:30:47.069 --> 00:30:49.140 going to do for us. It's to friend and I think one thing that 407 00:30:49.259 --> 00:30:56.980 really happens with universities when they're working with enroll want materials. They they forget 408 00:30:56.259 --> 00:31:02.980 that, especially dealing with, you know, sophomores to seniors. The amount 409 00:31:02.980 --> 00:31:06.369 of time that you have in front of someone is very, very limited in 410 00:31:06.450 --> 00:31:08.650 the beginning. You know, people are glancing at an email or glancing at 411 00:31:08.690 --> 00:31:12.890 a postcard on the counter when they come in from school, and so I 412 00:31:14.049 --> 00:31:18.119 think in the desire to kind of up their game, so to speak, 413 00:31:18.920 --> 00:31:26.319 they make unnecessary changes and forget about the importance of brand alignment. So just 414 00:31:26.599 --> 00:31:33.109 ensuring that your materials are cohesive, they look the same from, you know, 415 00:31:33.190 --> 00:31:37.549 things that are going out to a senior student to a sophomores student, 416 00:31:37.109 --> 00:31:41.990 because for you it might seem tired and it might seem old, but your 417 00:31:41.029 --> 00:31:45.789 audience is always changing. We want to build that familiarity. We want to 418 00:31:45.950 --> 00:31:49.859 be ensuring that we are aligning with the mission and vision and things like that. 419 00:31:51.099 --> 00:31:53.740 So my big takeaway is don't forget what you're doing. That's good. 420 00:31:55.539 --> 00:32:00.180 Stick with it and then the some of the magic comes in and this automation 421 00:32:00.339 --> 00:32:02.730 and things like that. That was done to really ensure that the engagement was 422 00:32:02.849 --> 00:32:07.009 happening at a different level. Great. How about you, Jesse? What 423 00:32:07.049 --> 00:32:14.089 would you leave with someone you know? I think it comes down to I 424 00:32:14.170 --> 00:32:19.599 mean, looking back on this project, it was three teams of people all 425 00:32:19.759 --> 00:32:23.519 in working on this project over a span of a few months. So I 426 00:32:23.680 --> 00:32:29.079 think and I think that the impact of this project, especially with the customization 427 00:32:29.240 --> 00:32:32.430 and the personalization we were able to do, is is going to the benefit 428 00:32:32.470 --> 00:32:37.509 of that is going to be huge, and I think clients or schools, 429 00:32:37.710 --> 00:32:40.630 if they want that, I think like knowing that it is going to take 430 00:32:42.109 --> 00:32:45.259 we can't do this on our own. It is going to take that manpower 431 00:32:45.059 --> 00:32:50.980 and it's going to take your team committing, because the client we were working 432 00:32:51.019 --> 00:32:52.740 with, the fit the thing patented team, the Kaylor team, we were 433 00:32:52.779 --> 00:32:55.980 all in on this, and the client to their entire team, this was 434 00:32:57.059 --> 00:33:00.609 their priority. They were all in, they were engaged, and so I 435 00:33:00.690 --> 00:33:04.490 think that's the thing that I would take away is that if you want this, 436 00:33:04.730 --> 00:33:07.130 I think that impact of this is great, but if you want that, 437 00:33:07.210 --> 00:33:10.690 I think realizing first that you have to go in, all in on 438 00:33:10.769 --> 00:33:15.119 that, and you have to realize the manpower in the team that you need 439 00:33:15.200 --> 00:33:20.440 for this is really important on the front end now, kind of that cut, 440 00:33:20.960 --> 00:33:22.440 that commitment. I think you're right. That's great, Matt. How 441 00:33:22.440 --> 00:33:27.750 about you? You know, I struggle to find just one takeaway because there 442 00:33:27.750 --> 00:33:32.069 are there are so many. But I really think that the biggest thing for 443 00:33:32.190 --> 00:33:39.309 me as as a content writer is to always remember that the point of all 444 00:33:39.390 --> 00:33:46.180 of this is to is to meet your audience where they are, and all 445 00:33:46.259 --> 00:33:52.059 of this effort that we're that we're putting into automation you it's it's not. 446 00:33:52.579 --> 00:33:57.250 It's not to add, you know, unnecessary complexity to messaging. It's not 447 00:33:57.490 --> 00:34:01.769 to be fancy. It is to it is to meet prospective students, future 448 00:34:01.849 --> 00:34:07.409 students, where they are right now and where we are doing it with, 449 00:34:07.610 --> 00:34:13.920 with a tone and with content that is, we certainly hope, addressing the 450 00:34:14.039 --> 00:34:17.719 concerns that they have, answering the questions they have. We are, we 451 00:34:17.840 --> 00:34:28.590 are helpful in focus, we are essentially it's an extension of the admissions team 452 00:34:28.750 --> 00:34:36.030 were we are going out before them and we are providing that that counseling. 453 00:34:36.230 --> 00:34:42.099 It's sort of pre counseling, right, we're ushering them along and so automation 454 00:34:42.460 --> 00:34:45.539 says, Hey, we see you, we know where you're coming from. 455 00:34:46.219 --> 00:34:50.659 We're here to help. That's what it's all about. Great thanks, Matt 456 00:34:51.139 --> 00:34:52.730 Troy. How about you? You've kind of seen both sides of it. 457 00:34:52.889 --> 00:34:55.170 You and I have been on both sides of it. To tell me a 458 00:34:55.170 --> 00:35:00.369 little bit about what your takeaway would be. My biggest takeaway is your team 459 00:35:00.409 --> 00:35:06.369 has done a great job of letting the prospective students know that you matter and 460 00:35:06.570 --> 00:35:09.239 kind of what Matt just said, you meeting them where they are and you're 461 00:35:09.239 --> 00:35:14.679 also letting them know we're listening to you, because each time they saw a 462 00:35:15.079 --> 00:35:19.559 postcard, each time they went to a landing page, their name aim was 463 00:35:19.679 --> 00:35:24.349 either prepopulated or it was there right at the very beginning. Then when they 464 00:35:24.389 --> 00:35:29.789 would put an input in the next step or when we did the next outreach, 465 00:35:30.110 --> 00:35:35.070 we would tell them what they told us and that was very instrumental in 466 00:35:35.309 --> 00:35:40.260 helping our client established the foundation of that relationship. And then something else I 467 00:35:40.380 --> 00:35:45.059 want to make sure that we say is all during this calm flow we were 468 00:35:45.460 --> 00:35:52.409 we were also making sure that the prospective students understood the mission of the school, 469 00:35:52.690 --> 00:35:57.610 making sure there was a mission fit, and that was very important to 470 00:35:57.929 --> 00:36:00.610 our perspective. Client and I think you did an excellent job of getting to 471 00:36:00.769 --> 00:36:07.480 know the prospective student but also letting them know about the school and making sure 472 00:36:07.599 --> 00:36:12.039 that they realized if they went to the school, there are certain beliefs, 473 00:36:12.079 --> 00:36:15.880 there's a certain culture there that we really hope they would be comfortable with. 474 00:36:15.440 --> 00:36:21.389 So that those are the takeaways that I wanted to make sure everyone understood about 475 00:36:21.670 --> 00:36:27.389 this campaign. That's great. I think that winds up our conversation. Bart 476 00:36:27.469 --> 00:36:30.349 I appreciate you bringing your team together. Do you have any last thoughts and 477 00:36:30.989 --> 00:36:35.900 anything that you can leave us with before we sign out? Yeah, the 478 00:36:35.940 --> 00:36:38.179 one last thought I would say, and this is something that Matt said earlier 479 00:36:38.219 --> 00:36:40.059 that I just wanted to kind of I wasn't sure if he was going to 480 00:36:40.099 --> 00:36:44.619 use it as his as his takeaway, but I'm going to kind of use 481 00:36:44.619 --> 00:36:46.329 it as kind of our punctuation at the end of the end of the podcast, 482 00:36:46.690 --> 00:36:50.769 is that we talk a lot about automation. We talk a lot about 483 00:36:50.769 --> 00:36:53.449 all kinds of things that are at the finger tips of marketers these days, 484 00:36:53.489 --> 00:36:57.809 whether it's social media, whether it's, you know, paper, Click, 485 00:36:58.010 --> 00:37:01.039 social match. There's all kinds of tools out there, but at the end 486 00:37:01.039 --> 00:37:06.239 of the day, we're trying to build relationships and and we want to maintain 487 00:37:06.400 --> 00:37:10.199 the illusion of that relationship. And I really love that analogy of the magician 488 00:37:10.679 --> 00:37:15.989 because I think that sometimes we tend to forget that. We that people understand 489 00:37:16.070 --> 00:37:22.230 automation. They understand what's going on. It's not a mystery. But everybody's 490 00:37:22.230 --> 00:37:23.469 willing, just like at a magic show, we're all willing to kind of 491 00:37:23.510 --> 00:37:30.019 participate in the illusion where to participate along the way, but it's it's that 492 00:37:30.260 --> 00:37:35.139 one mistake that if that, you know, if the if the rabbit jumps 493 00:37:35.179 --> 00:37:38.539 out of the hat too early or kind of scrolls across the stage, it 494 00:37:39.019 --> 00:37:43.699 runs the illusion. It ruins the experience in it and it changes the dynamic. 495 00:37:43.780 --> 00:37:46.650 And so I guess I would take away to that as you put together 496 00:37:46.690 --> 00:37:51.010 these programs, as you look at all these tools, recognize that they are 497 00:37:51.489 --> 00:37:55.449 tools and, like with most tools, there's some safety features and and I 498 00:37:55.489 --> 00:38:00.880 would just make sure that as as highered marketers start to get into these spaces 499 00:38:00.960 --> 00:38:04.559 of the automation, of the different tools, of the different ways of doing 500 00:38:04.679 --> 00:38:07.760 that, reach out and ask for help, you know, because I mean 501 00:38:07.840 --> 00:38:10.519 sometimes there are people who have experienced in that that have done it before. 502 00:38:12.400 --> 00:38:15.269 Don't hesitate to reach out at all. I'll make myself available just if you 503 00:38:15.469 --> 00:38:19.590 ever want to have a quick conversation, just to ask how did you do 504 00:38:19.829 --> 00:38:22.949 that? You know there's there's no strings attached. To be happy to share 505 00:38:22.949 --> 00:38:24.550 anything with you, and I know troy would feel the same way about that. 506 00:38:24.670 --> 00:38:28.940 So that's some things I would leave troy, but it's been a great 507 00:38:28.980 --> 00:38:31.300 conversation. I just want to thank my team for what they've what they've offered. 508 00:38:31.739 --> 00:38:36.139 I think you and your team as well. I would like to say 509 00:38:36.300 --> 00:38:39.900 that I often say that Bart and I interview people that we like, it 510 00:38:40.019 --> 00:38:45.289 admire in the highered marketing space, and that is so true with the people 511 00:38:45.409 --> 00:38:49.050 that I'm spending time with today. So thank you, Matt, Jenny and 512 00:38:49.170 --> 00:38:54.090 Jesse. The higher and market of podcast is sponsored by Kaylor solutions and education 513 00:38:54.250 --> 00:38:59.760 marketing and branding agency and by think patent did, a marketing, execution and 514 00:38:59.840 --> 00:39:06.000 printing company providing mailing services to hire ED institutions. On behalf of my cohost 515 00:39:06.119 --> 00:39:09.550 Bart Taylor and his team, I'm troy singer. Thank you for joining us. 516 00:39:13.269 --> 00:39:16.190 You've been listening to the Higher Ed Marketer to ensure that you never miss 517 00:39:16.230 --> 00:39:21.829 an episode. Subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player, if you're 518 00:39:21.909 --> 00:39:24.340 listening with apple podcasts. We'd love for you to leave a quick rating of 519 00:39:24.380 --> 00:39:29.219 the show. Simply tap the number of stars you think the podcast deserves. 520 00:39:29.940 --> 00:39:30.780 Until next time,