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July 12, 2022

How to Amplify Your Students' Voice for Success

How to Amplify Your Students' Voice for Success

If there was ever an episode to give you a roadmap to success in higher education, it's this one.  

Kathy Payne, VP for Enrollment Management, and Kathy Howell, Associate VP for Marketing Communications at Delaware Valley University, join us today to talk about their roadmap to success by amplifying their students' voices.  

Join us as we discuss:

  • The two Kathy's road map to success at Delaware Valley.
  • How the college tour played a role in the success of the school by emphasizing the students' journeys.
  • How Delaware Valley has been able to differentiate itself with robust experimental learning systems. 

The Higher Ed Marketer podcast is sponsored by Caylor Solutions, an Education Marketing and Branding Agency, and by Think Patented, a Marketing Execution, Printing and Mailing provider of Higher Ed solutions.

    

 

Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:00.200 --> 00:00:06.320 The High Red Marketer podcast is sponsored by the ZEMI APP enabling colleges and universities 2 00:00:06.519 --> 00:00:14.519 to engage interested students before they even apply. You're listening to the Higher Ed 3 00:00:14.599 --> 00:00:19.839 Marketer, a podcast geared towards marketing professionals in higher education. This show will 4 00:00:19.879 --> 00:00:24.760 tackle all sorts of questions related to student recruitment, donor relations, marketing trends, 5 00:00:24.760 --> 00:00:29.559 new technologies and so much more. If you're looking for conversations centered around 6 00:00:29.559 --> 00:00:33.719 where the industry is going, this podcast is for you. Let's get into 7 00:00:33.759 --> 00:00:44.359 the show. Welcome to the Higher Ed Marketer Podcast, where each week we 8 00:00:44.399 --> 00:00:48.640 interview higher Ed marketers that we admire for the benefit and hopefully, the betterment 9 00:00:48.719 --> 00:00:53.039 of the entire higher reed marketing community. My name is troy singer and I 10 00:00:53.079 --> 00:00:58.000 am here each week with Bart Taylor, and today we talked to Kathy Howell 11 00:00:58.200 --> 00:01:03.599 and Kathy Payne from Delaware Valley University, and our conversation is how to amplify 12 00:01:03.719 --> 00:01:08.760 the student voice for success. They not only give you the results of the 13 00:01:08.799 --> 00:01:14.640 big success that they have experienced over the past year, but they give you 14 00:01:14.719 --> 00:01:18.799 exactly how they reached it, and I think this is an episode that's not 15 00:01:18.840 --> 00:01:25.359 only going to be entertaining but very informational and an episode that everyone can take 16 00:01:25.480 --> 00:01:29.000 something away from. I agree, Troy. This is like, if there's 17 00:01:29.040 --> 00:01:32.920 ever an episode that gives your roadmap for success, I really feel like they 18 00:01:32.959 --> 00:01:36.680 do it. I mean they kind of said here's where we started, here's 19 00:01:36.680 --> 00:01:40.079 what we did, here's how we continued and this is the success that we 20 00:01:40.120 --> 00:01:42.120 saw and a lot of it has to do the things with that we've talked 21 00:01:42.120 --> 00:01:47.040 about on several other episodes and you know, without giving too much away, 22 00:01:47.400 --> 00:01:49.359 just pay attention and this might be an episode that you actually, you know, 23 00:01:49.480 --> 00:01:53.400 listen to a couple of times and maybe even take some notes. So 24 00:01:53.439 --> 00:01:57.040 I really excited to have this conversation for you. Here's our conversation with the 25 00:01:57.120 --> 00:02:05.439 Cathy's. It is my pleasure to welcome Kathy Payne, VP of enrollment management, 26 00:02:05.519 --> 00:02:13.360 and Kathy how VP of marketing communications, from Delaware Value University in Pennsylvania. 27 00:02:13.800 --> 00:02:16.199 And if you would, if one of the Cathy's would give us a 28 00:02:16.240 --> 00:02:22.520 glimpse or introduction to Delaware Valley University. Sure, thanks, Troy. This 29 00:02:22.639 --> 00:02:27.039 is Kathy Payne Um so. Del Valle is a four year private university in 30 00:02:27.120 --> 00:02:34.000 Bylestown PA. We have around two thousand students. We have undergraduate majors, 31 00:02:34.080 --> 00:02:38.800 nine masters, a doctor of ED, variety of adult education options. Um. 32 00:02:38.840 --> 00:02:42.879 Interestingly, we were founded in eighteen ninety six as the national farm school 33 00:02:43.400 --> 00:02:47.000 based on the idea of science with practice. We're celebrating our hundred and twenty 34 00:02:47.000 --> 00:02:52.199 fifth year, so it's a really exciting time. Um. The university is 35 00:02:52.319 --> 00:02:55.800 known for being a close knit community. Um, but in fact we sit 36 00:02:55.840 --> 00:03:01.240 on over a thousand acres spanning across three different properties. So really unique and 37 00:03:01.560 --> 00:03:07.159 lends itself to the academic offerings that we we have available to our students. 38 00:03:07.639 --> 00:03:13.960 We offer a robust Um academic offerings, businessing, humanities, agg and environmental 39 00:03:14.000 --> 00:03:16.639 science. Um. Most known for our programs in that school, as well 40 00:03:16.680 --> 00:03:22.080 as life and physical science. Um. We have unique program offerings and equine 41 00:03:22.199 --> 00:03:25.000 dairy science, Zoo Science, to name a few. Um. I joined 42 00:03:25.280 --> 00:03:30.879 we all in March of twenty, which was an exciting and, Um, 43 00:03:30.000 --> 00:03:34.759 wildly unique time in and of its help Um, and I'm lucky to have 44 00:03:34.800 --> 00:03:39.439 the partner that I do in Kathy how so, and from this point forward 45 00:03:39.479 --> 00:03:44.840 they will be better known as Kathy P and Kathy h. There you go, 46 00:03:45.319 --> 00:03:51.759 along with Bartsi and troy es so we don't feel alone. Got Exactly 47 00:03:52.039 --> 00:03:58.479 so in our initial conversation with the Cathy's Uh we identified, or I guess 48 00:03:58.520 --> 00:04:02.639 they admitted, although they are it's a wonderful university, there was some what 49 00:04:02.680 --> 00:04:08.280 we would call opportunities and I would love for you to share with our audience 50 00:04:08.319 --> 00:04:13.439 those opportunities for anything, just to set a foundation, because we the solutions 51 00:04:13.800 --> 00:04:16.519 and the come up, as we'll call it, is what we really want 52 00:04:16.560 --> 00:04:20.920 to emphasize later in the episode. So, if you would so, this 53 00:04:21.000 --> 00:04:29.240 is Kathy H we we really viewed two pretty big challenges that Kathy and I 54 00:04:29.319 --> 00:04:32.680 started working on essentially two years ago, because I also started in March. 55 00:04:34.120 --> 00:04:39.959 and Um, the first one is name recognition and visibility. We're in a 56 00:04:40.120 --> 00:04:45.120 very crowded higher reed market here outside of Philadelphia. Our Name, Delaware Valley 57 00:04:45.240 --> 00:04:48.959 University, gets confused a lot. Um People think we are in Delaware. 58 00:04:49.160 --> 00:04:56.199 We are not in the Delaware Valley outside Philadelphia. And the second thing is 59 00:04:56.240 --> 00:05:00.439 that are really important point of differentiation, beside some of the unique programs that 60 00:05:00.480 --> 00:05:06.560 we offer, is our experience three sixty program and, as as Kathy mentioned, 61 00:05:06.720 --> 00:05:12.360 that really started with our founding in on the basis of science with practice, 62 00:05:12.959 --> 00:05:18.000 and our founder, rabbi Dr Joseph Crosscoff was was really a visionary, 63 00:05:18.120 --> 00:05:23.519 because other schools, from what we can find in our research, we're not 64 00:05:23.600 --> 00:05:28.600 looking at this idea of science with practice at that time. He was really 65 00:05:28.639 --> 00:05:32.519 a very formative thinker in a lot of ways and a lot of schools now 66 00:05:32.680 --> 00:05:39.920 have experience learning, experiential learning, but most of them have what's really an 67 00:05:39.920 --> 00:05:45.120 internship program at del Valle e three sixty is really something much more. It 68 00:05:45.279 --> 00:05:48.360 starts with the first day of class. It goes through all four years. 69 00:05:48.399 --> 00:05:56.600 Students actually are doing not only internships but research, civic engagements, study abroad, 70 00:05:57.480 --> 00:06:01.839 various leadership opportunities and their really building their resume from day one and this 71 00:06:01.920 --> 00:06:08.639 culminates in a Co curricular transcript that supports their preparedness and success beyond graduation. 72 00:06:09.680 --> 00:06:13.399 That's great and I really love some of the things that you're doing because one 73 00:06:13.920 --> 00:06:15.639 I meet with so many different schools and we talk about okay, tell me 74 00:06:15.680 --> 00:06:18.360 what what's different about your school? How are you different? And and the 75 00:06:18.360 --> 00:06:21.839 first thing, especially a small a lot of privates do about your size, 76 00:06:21.920 --> 00:06:26.120 is well, we are, you know, small college. We've got, 77 00:06:26.160 --> 00:06:30.480 you know, very intimate relationships between the president, the professors and the students. 78 00:06:30.480 --> 00:06:32.480 Small class. Well, everybody does. That's how you're different from the 79 00:06:32.480 --> 00:06:35.959 big state schools. How are you different from the other three thousand privates that 80 00:06:35.959 --> 00:06:41.920 are out there? And so I really applaud you for being able to articulate 81 00:06:42.040 --> 00:06:45.920 and and differentiate yourself with this robust experiential learning program because I think that, 82 00:06:46.360 --> 00:06:48.560 yes, some other schools have that, but the way that you describe it 83 00:06:48.600 --> 00:06:53.079 and articulate it, I think, is so well done and so well it's 84 00:06:53.120 --> 00:06:56.680 thoughtful and I applaud you on that because I and I use that as an 85 00:06:56.680 --> 00:07:00.800 example for our listeners, really, if you do have something as unique as 86 00:07:00.959 --> 00:07:04.560 as e three sixty one, branded okay, and and that that starts to 87 00:07:04.720 --> 00:07:09.519 one, separate it from if you're just calling it experiential learning, because everybody 88 00:07:09.519 --> 00:07:13.279 else calls it experiential learning, you're just gonna be one of many by calling 89 00:07:13.319 --> 00:07:15.399 it a three sixty. I think it's a really good brand point, but 90 00:07:15.480 --> 00:07:18.639 I also think that just the idea that you know, being able to describe 91 00:07:18.680 --> 00:07:21.199 that as well done. So sorry that was a long winded way of saying 92 00:07:21.319 --> 00:07:25.480 Nice job on that. And then also I wanted to let you know that 93 00:07:25.560 --> 00:07:29.759 you're not alone with that visibility opportunity. I hear so many schools say. 94 00:07:30.079 --> 00:07:32.759 I'm tired of hearing we're the best kept secret. Um. You know, 95 00:07:32.879 --> 00:07:36.800 so many people use that Um, and well meaning people, board members, 96 00:07:36.839 --> 00:07:39.959 other people. It's like, well, we're just the best kept secret. 97 00:07:40.160 --> 00:07:43.639 Maybe we should do something about that. Obviously that's what you're working on and 98 00:07:43.879 --> 00:07:46.920 would love to kind of learn more about how you are addressing that, because 99 00:07:46.959 --> 00:07:50.800 I think that the idea of one being able to describe yourself, articulate yourself, 100 00:07:51.120 --> 00:07:55.319 but now getting yourself out there. Let's talk a little bit about that, 101 00:07:55.360 --> 00:08:00.439 Troy. I know you've got kind of some questions about that actually flowed 102 00:08:00.560 --> 00:08:03.680 right into what I wanted to ask and having them now, they set the 103 00:08:03.720 --> 00:08:09.519 stage of the opportunities that they identified. What are some of the increase of 104 00:08:09.240 --> 00:08:13.120 the improvements that have been experienced? So if you would kind of lead us 105 00:08:13.160 --> 00:08:18.240 down that path, absolutely, UM, as I've said to many trustees and 106 00:08:18.360 --> 00:08:22.480 my colleagues for quite a few months, this has been a really fun year. 107 00:08:22.839 --> 00:08:28.319 Um, we actually implemented a new CRM, which I mean I'm not 108 00:08:28.319 --> 00:08:31.120 telling anybody here anything that they don't already know? Um. The efficiencies that 109 00:08:31.159 --> 00:08:35.480 you gain from having a really slick, automated system that allows the team to 110 00:08:35.519 --> 00:08:43.200 focus on those relationships cannot be understated or overstated. Um. We also are 111 00:08:43.240 --> 00:08:48.399 seeing really healthy numbers all throughout our funnel. So for fall two, Um, 112 00:08:48.480 --> 00:08:52.240 we have over growth. First last year and APPS accepted students and we're 113 00:08:52.279 --> 00:08:56.039 currently sitting at the largest number of freshman deposits in six years. Um, 114 00:08:56.159 --> 00:09:01.639 roughly increase over last year in nearly twenty eight first the year prior Um. 115 00:09:01.679 --> 00:09:05.120 Additionally, Um, and this goes to, I think, the visibility question, 116 00:09:05.480 --> 00:09:09.879 we have deposits right now from seven states where we had none last year, 117 00:09:11.000 --> 00:09:16.039 Colorado, Michigan, Ohio, Hawaii. Um. We also have deposits 118 00:09:16.039 --> 00:09:20.320 for more local counties where none existed last year. Um. So not only 119 00:09:20.360 --> 00:09:26.559 are we sort of broadening our visibility outside of our core market, but we're 120 00:09:26.600 --> 00:09:30.399 getting into different areas within the core market, which I think is really important 121 00:09:30.440 --> 00:09:33.840 for us. Um. We have strong academic quality, nice spell shaped curve 122 00:09:33.919 --> 00:09:39.720 with the class Um. I've been trying to poke holes and find, Um, 123 00:09:39.759 --> 00:09:43.159 you know, what's going to go wrong, and I've yet to do 124 00:09:43.200 --> 00:09:46.279 it and we actually hit our goal as of May one, which was wildly 125 00:09:46.320 --> 00:09:50.879 exciting for this campus. So it's great. That's really exciting and congratulations on 126 00:09:50.919 --> 00:09:54.200 that. I know a lot of schools are not in the same boat, 127 00:09:54.799 --> 00:09:58.480 but I think that goes back to the the intentionality that I hear in your 128 00:09:58.559 --> 00:10:01.279 voice and what what Kath H has been talking about is that being able to 129 00:10:01.320 --> 00:10:05.320 describe yourselves, being able to articulate that and be able to take advantage of 130 00:10:05.320 --> 00:10:09.080 opportunities that come along. I mean, it's it's one of those things that, 131 00:10:09.840 --> 00:10:13.480 Um, you know, there's a lot of different ways and a lot 132 00:10:13.519 --> 00:10:16.720 of schools are trying different ways. I mean everybody's, you know, uh, 133 00:10:16.879 --> 00:10:20.159 you know, looking at what's that silver bullet, and there's not a 134 00:10:20.159 --> 00:10:22.759 silver bullet. I mean, let's just be honest with that. I mean 135 00:10:22.919 --> 00:10:28.120 there's a lot of hard work that goes up to setting the table for something 136 00:10:28.360 --> 00:10:31.080 to happen, which I think that you guys did a lot of, but 137 00:10:31.559 --> 00:10:33.639 obviously something came along that you then also took advantage of. Tell us a 138 00:10:33.639 --> 00:10:37.159 little bit about that. We talk a lot about it on this show. 139 00:10:37.879 --> 00:10:43.240 Schools are really struggling today that make the same at spen work. CPMS are 140 00:10:43.320 --> 00:10:46.759 up eighty nine year over a year. On facebook and instagram. Our College 141 00:10:46.759 --> 00:10:52.240 clients are no longer looking for rented audiences. They're looking for an owned community 142 00:10:52.320 --> 00:10:56.480 where they can engage students even before they apply. This is why Zemi has 143 00:10:56.519 --> 00:11:00.919 become so crucial for our clients. With over one million students, close to 144 00:11:00.960 --> 00:11:05.519 ten Tho five star ratings, consistently ranked as one of the top social laps 145 00:11:05.919 --> 00:11:09.200 and recently one of Apple's hot APPs of the week. There simply isn't anything 146 00:11:09.240 --> 00:11:13.559 out there like it, and we have seen it all. Zem Not only 147 00:11:13.600 --> 00:11:18.279 provides the best space for student engagement but the most unique and actional data for 148 00:11:18.320 --> 00:11:22.799 the one sixty college and university partners. We know firsthand from our clients that 149 00:11:22.960 --> 00:11:28.080 Zee me is a must have strategy for Gen z check them out now at 150 00:11:28.240 --> 00:11:35.960 colleges dot Zem dot com. That's colleges dot Z E M E dot Com. 151 00:11:35.000 --> 00:11:41.080 And yes, tell them Barton Troy sent you. So Um and I'll 152 00:11:41.120 --> 00:11:46.759 start, Kath and please jump in. Um. Back in spring of, 153 00:11:46.399 --> 00:11:52.000 actually now it would have been fall of, we were approached by the producers 154 00:11:52.000 --> 00:11:56.919 at the college tour and Um. After some initial conversations with their producers. 155 00:11:58.200 --> 00:12:01.279 Um, and then, obviously, if allow up, conversation with at P 156 00:12:01.480 --> 00:12:05.519 h. We basically went to the president and said we can't say no to 157 00:12:05.559 --> 00:12:09.519 this and sleep at night. So, Um, from there we went on 158 00:12:09.600 --> 00:12:16.840 to Um really get into the project, Kath please. So the project featured 159 00:12:16.879 --> 00:12:22.240 ten of our students covering different majors, different types of backgrounds, different interests, 160 00:12:22.399 --> 00:12:26.559 and Um, they filled on our campus and our kids were amazing. 161 00:12:26.759 --> 00:12:31.919 They did just an excellent job. And, uh, what we found was 162 00:12:31.960 --> 00:12:37.480 they really did the most effective job of explaining our story. So that challenge 163 00:12:37.480 --> 00:12:41.840 of really differentiating e three sixty was so clear when the students told their stories 164 00:12:41.919 --> 00:12:46.960 and explained what they were studying, where their passions were, what they were 165 00:12:46.000 --> 00:12:50.919 doing. It really brought it, brought it to life in a way that 166 00:12:50.320 --> 00:12:54.200 only video can bring something to life. And we didn't, we didn't stop 167 00:12:54.240 --> 00:12:58.240 there. So, yes, now we have this this segment, this thirty 168 00:12:58.279 --> 00:13:03.360 minutes segment, ten individual episodes. Um, we marketed that thing everywhere. 169 00:13:03.440 --> 00:13:07.759 We marketed it internally, we marketed it to our internal audiences, our faculty, 170 00:13:07.799 --> 00:13:13.399 our staff, our students are board, and we marketed it externally through 171 00:13:13.559 --> 00:13:18.639 press releases and and uh we had a launch party on the quad when the 172 00:13:18.679 --> 00:13:22.559 kids came back for school in the fall, with a big screen television and 173 00:13:22.639 --> 00:13:28.320 popcorn and a red carpet and UH social influencers. They're um posting all along 174 00:13:28.360 --> 00:13:33.320 throughout the night. A lot of local media came. We had big searchlights 175 00:13:33.320 --> 00:13:35.960 on the quad. It was an amazing party and really gave a fun start 176 00:13:37.000 --> 00:13:41.159 to the fall season. And we then took the messages and the phrases that 177 00:13:41.320 --> 00:13:46.279 came out of the college tour, the students words themselves, and integrated those 178 00:13:46.399 --> 00:13:52.480 into our entire recruiting campaign for the last eight months. So our view book 179 00:13:52.960 --> 00:13:58.039 has, at the very beginning and introduction to the college tour and Qr codes 180 00:13:58.159 --> 00:14:01.720 all the way through that link students to each of the messages as they relate, 181 00:14:01.840 --> 00:14:07.679 whether it's where we're located, e three, sixty Um, a number 182 00:14:07.720 --> 00:14:11.399 of different majors, so that anybody looking at our view book could instantly view 183 00:14:11.440 --> 00:14:16.559 the video and and understand more about del Bell. We made a purpose just 184 00:14:16.639 --> 00:14:18.279 to jump in. We did make a point also of having one of the 185 00:14:18.279 --> 00:14:26.000 segments highlight location Um to kind of get at that sort of confusion surrounding where 186 00:14:26.039 --> 00:14:31.919 actually are. We situated in. Doylestown, is a really lovely area, 187 00:14:31.000 --> 00:14:35.279 so being able to put some focus on that for prospective families was great as 188 00:14:35.320 --> 00:14:39.000 well. Kathy, I fell in love with your town through that episode and 189 00:14:39.000 --> 00:14:43.559 you probably have. Yes, thank you. I was. I was setting 190 00:14:43.720 --> 00:14:48.840 up for that in fight we we then took the phrases the students used, 191 00:14:50.080 --> 00:14:54.200 things like be a wildlife warrior, best decision I ever made and a great 192 00:14:54.200 --> 00:15:00.840 place to call home, and integrated those into an outdoor campaign with pretty extensive 193 00:15:00.919 --> 00:15:05.200 use of buses and billboards in our core market area. We also had a 194 00:15:05.320 --> 00:15:13.559 very aggressive digital campaign through a number of platforms, um probably the largest being 195 00:15:13.559 --> 00:15:16.639 google, but other platforms as well. And then we also had an organic 196 00:15:16.720 --> 00:15:22.120 social media campaign. So we created tool kits for each of the ten students 197 00:15:22.120 --> 00:15:26.679 who were part of this project and gave them frames to use and ideas and 198 00:15:26.759 --> 00:15:31.399 they pushed out their story to their friends to get that more organic sharing going 199 00:15:33.200 --> 00:15:39.360 within their age group and Um, the success was wonderful. Kathy already mentioned 200 00:15:39.519 --> 00:15:43.559 the success that she's had in terms of the recruiting for this fall. I 201 00:15:43.600 --> 00:15:48.960 can add that Um new visits to our website during this period where up sevent 202 00:15:50.159 --> 00:15:56.000 over the prior year. Web traffic conversions from social media posts, so not 203 00:15:56.000 --> 00:15:58.759 not from the ads, but from the organic social media. We're up forty 204 00:15:58.799 --> 00:16:03.919 three percent versus the prior year. And, you know, in addition to 205 00:16:03.000 --> 00:16:07.679 those, you know the metrics that we can that we can look to in 206 00:16:07.759 --> 00:16:11.399 marketing. There really was a sense of pride, I think, by our 207 00:16:11.440 --> 00:16:14.879 student community in our capus because, you know, we're a small campus that 208 00:16:14.960 --> 00:16:19.159 doesn't typically have enough money to do exciting things and this was really a big 209 00:16:19.200 --> 00:16:25.720 deal that our students got excited about, our faculty got excited about. It's 210 00:16:25.759 --> 00:16:27.480 really been a it's really been a big success. Yeah, I think it's 211 00:16:27.480 --> 00:16:33.559 a pride point, Um, and I do think that it really was a 212 00:16:33.639 --> 00:16:37.519 smart investment. Um. And it didn't stop that sort of the production, 213 00:16:37.600 --> 00:16:42.519 I mean the production value of the episode is Um, it's pristine right, 214 00:16:42.639 --> 00:16:48.559 but it doesn't stop there. We heavily used all the different collateral that we 215 00:16:48.639 --> 00:16:52.679 received a role B roll, I mean the drone shots of our beautiful campus. 216 00:16:52.720 --> 00:16:55.639 The list goes on and on. So, UM, are O. 217 00:16:55.799 --> 00:16:59.879 I. You know, while while difficult to define in a very stycinct or 218 00:17:00.200 --> 00:17:03.720 distinct way, um heavy usage of the collateral. I mean it paid for 219 00:17:03.759 --> 00:17:07.319 itself already. Yeah, and just to bring context to this, I think 220 00:17:07.640 --> 00:17:11.599 I'm so excited about everything you talked about. I mean I could probably talk 221 00:17:11.599 --> 00:17:14.599 for another hour about some of the points you made, but I think just 222 00:17:14.640 --> 00:17:18.200 to bring context ever our listeners, in case you haven't heard some of the 223 00:17:18.279 --> 00:17:22.960 other episodes. Um, we worked with Alex Boylan, UH, one of 224 00:17:22.960 --> 00:17:26.720 the executive producers of the college tour, uh, and and you can go 225 00:17:26.799 --> 00:17:29.319 back and listen to that episode. But you know, basically they're going around 226 00:17:29.319 --> 00:17:33.920 different campuses and just kind of addressing that problem of how can people experience more 227 00:17:34.000 --> 00:17:38.880 campus college visits without actually physically going there? And so it's actually a a 228 00:17:40.799 --> 00:17:45.640 streaming, uh television show that streams on Amazon prime and several other outlets, 229 00:17:47.079 --> 00:17:48.559 and I think that the thing I really like about this that I kind of 230 00:17:48.599 --> 00:17:52.400 want to point out, and we've talked to a couple of their folks. 231 00:17:52.400 --> 00:17:55.720 I think Lindsay Nyquist from Fort Lewis. They were the first episode of the 232 00:17:55.759 --> 00:17:59.000 College Tour and we were the book ends of the Season One. Yeah, 233 00:17:59.119 --> 00:18:02.680 yeah, and so there on season three or four now and you know, 234 00:18:02.759 --> 00:18:06.279 up to fifty or sixty different tours. But I think the thing that's important 235 00:18:06.319 --> 00:18:08.519 for for me to point out to everybody because, I mean, you know, 236 00:18:08.559 --> 00:18:11.279 there's only so many episodes that the college tour is going to be able 237 00:18:11.279 --> 00:18:15.680 to do and so whether or not you have them come on your campus, 238 00:18:15.000 --> 00:18:18.559 that's a different discussion and we're not necessarily doing that. But what I wanted 239 00:18:18.599 --> 00:18:21.920 to point out is that you guys, and you use the word investment, 240 00:18:22.000 --> 00:18:25.680 you invested in what you had done. So you did a you had had 241 00:18:25.720 --> 00:18:29.759 the had them come on and had you only done that and had them, 242 00:18:29.839 --> 00:18:33.079 had they put that on Amazon prime, there would have been a handful of 243 00:18:33.119 --> 00:18:34.400 people that would have watched it, would have learned about you and would have 244 00:18:34.480 --> 00:18:38.200 understood it. But what you did is you amplified that into so many more 245 00:18:38.279 --> 00:18:42.039 things, which I again, I applaud you guys. You're kind of doing 246 00:18:42.200 --> 00:18:45.559 everything that we've been talking about on this higher Ed Marketing Podcast, in the 247 00:18:45.599 --> 00:18:48.720 sense that, you know, you took the quotes, you took the student 248 00:18:48.839 --> 00:18:52.880 stories, you took what was going on in there from the voices of the 249 00:18:52.920 --> 00:18:57.960 students who sometimes we forget they're the best representatives of our school. Yeah, 250 00:18:59.119 --> 00:19:02.319 and and you know, sometimes I laughed that people will say, you know, 251 00:19:02.359 --> 00:19:03.839 what do you think we have to do? Bart? You know, 252 00:19:03.039 --> 00:19:06.880 well, I'm a fifty two year old white male. I don't know. 253 00:19:07.000 --> 00:19:10.720 We need to talk to your students and find out what they are liking, 254 00:19:10.759 --> 00:19:14.039 you know, and I can give you the channels and give you the direction, 255 00:19:14.079 --> 00:19:17.440 but don't ask me to know what's trending on Tiktok right now. To 256 00:19:17.599 --> 00:19:22.160 to make a big yeah, and so I think that it's it's such a 257 00:19:22.200 --> 00:19:23.880 wonderful thing and so, you know, we'll talk more about it as we 258 00:19:23.920 --> 00:19:27.359 go along, but I just Um, I'm I really think and I just 259 00:19:27.440 --> 00:19:30.839 want to kind of keep bringing that home to our listeners. Is that you 260 00:19:30.880 --> 00:19:34.319 know, yes, you've got these tools that you've invested in. How can 261 00:19:34.359 --> 00:19:38.079 you amplify them and get every last bit of juice out of them? I 262 00:19:38.079 --> 00:19:41.279 think that's part of the key. And is that kind of what you feel 263 00:19:41.279 --> 00:19:42.920 like? I mean, as you look at the success, it's not the 264 00:19:42.960 --> 00:19:45.720 fact that you guys just signed up for the college tour, it's everything that 265 00:19:45.759 --> 00:19:49.160 you did after that. It's true statement. It was the full integration. 266 00:19:49.279 --> 00:19:53.640 I mean it was the partnership between enrollment management and marketing. It was it 267 00:19:53.720 --> 00:19:57.119 was campus wide. Quite honestly, there was. There was a local pride 268 00:19:57.200 --> 00:20:03.039 that stemmed from it. But the biggest takeaway for me was what we just 269 00:20:03.079 --> 00:20:06.920 talked about, that the students are the reason that we're here. who better 270 00:20:07.000 --> 00:20:11.000 to serve as an ambassador for the actual student experience, whether it's academic or 271 00:20:11.079 --> 00:20:15.200 social, Um, inside or out of the classroom? There is, they 272 00:20:15.240 --> 00:20:21.000 are it Um. So that was certainly the learning moment for me. Um, 273 00:20:21.039 --> 00:20:22.640 you know, I've been in higher education for almost thirty years at this 274 00:20:22.680 --> 00:20:26.200 point, but and they're the reason that I come to work every day. 275 00:20:26.200 --> 00:20:30.039 But at the same time, just hearing those authentic stories, Um, it 276 00:20:30.160 --> 00:20:34.880 was a moment for me to to really just see all this colony. Yeah, 277 00:20:36.079 --> 00:20:40.279 and you mentioned that it was such a pride point on campus. Obviously, 278 00:20:40.319 --> 00:20:44.119 we we have the two of you representing marketing and enrollment. How did 279 00:20:44.200 --> 00:20:47.519 play out for advancement? I mean obviously that that had to have a play 280 00:20:47.559 --> 00:20:51.440 into it too, because, I mean that's the reason why people are asked 281 00:20:51.440 --> 00:20:53.640 to give and why they feel that they are empowered to give. They want 282 00:20:53.640 --> 00:20:57.759 to be a hero in these lives of these students and how it's affecting lives. 283 00:20:59.200 --> 00:21:03.359 How? How was that leveraged and used an advancement. Well, we 284 00:21:03.359 --> 00:21:07.240 we shared some of these stories, certainly in the fundraising effort, and it 285 00:21:07.359 --> 00:21:11.640 all really fell under the umbrella of our hundred anniversary that we're celebrating right now. 286 00:21:11.680 --> 00:21:15.839 But we used it's one of the things. So we took the college 287 00:21:15.880 --> 00:21:21.240 tour and spread it through a lot of mediums and to a lot of different 288 00:21:21.240 --> 00:21:23.359 people, but we also were able to weave it under the umbrella of our 289 00:21:25.279 --> 00:21:29.759 anniversary as an example of students learning by doing, as they have from the 290 00:21:29.880 --> 00:21:33.640 very, very beginning. So we've had we're not in campaign mode right now, 291 00:21:33.680 --> 00:21:37.680 but we've had an excellent fundraising year. On track to do but I 292 00:21:37.720 --> 00:21:41.720 don't have the statistics with you, but on track to reach their goals and 293 00:21:41.759 --> 00:21:44.799 have a very, very successful year, and I have to believe the college 294 00:21:44.799 --> 00:21:49.279 tour was part of that. Absolutely and they use one other area cat that 295 00:21:49.319 --> 00:21:53.519 I think that this was so important, was part part of our strategic plan, 296 00:21:53.599 --> 00:21:57.599 is to expand corporate partnerships. Um, certainly and supported the mission in 297 00:21:57.640 --> 00:22:03.119 support of our students, the sixty program Um, and we had an event 298 00:22:03.240 --> 00:22:06.279 this year that was hosted for the first time. It was the inaugural event, 299 00:22:06.359 --> 00:22:11.440 and I don't mean to step more about that bookathy was able to utilize 300 00:22:11.799 --> 00:22:15.319 so much of what we got from the college tour. Um, for that 301 00:22:15.400 --> 00:22:22.359 event in particular, we did. We we utilized footage from from the college 302 00:22:22.359 --> 00:22:26.799 tour and a few other things and created a new video for this corporate audience. 303 00:22:26.319 --> 00:22:32.920 We also, Um, utilized footage from the college tour in a documentary 304 00:22:33.000 --> 00:22:36.680 that we put together for a hundred and twenty fifth anniversary, which was called 305 00:22:37.079 --> 00:22:40.480 the vision indoors and it was, you know, started with the life of 306 00:22:40.559 --> 00:22:45.839 Cross cough and that just won a gold digital marketing award, by the way. 307 00:22:45.359 --> 00:22:52.559 Um, that I mean the college tour video, both the main segments 308 00:22:52.599 --> 00:22:57.279 and the B role have been used so many times and so many places. 309 00:22:57.759 --> 00:23:03.279 Um, even even to the point where, Um, some of our students 310 00:23:03.400 --> 00:23:07.759 in h in an English class, we're putting together a video and we gave 311 00:23:07.799 --> 00:23:11.319 them access to all the B rule and they used to create their own projects 312 00:23:11.359 --> 00:23:15.079 and it's amazing. Yeah, that's great. It's it's made it all the 313 00:23:15.079 --> 00:23:19.440 way down to students having access to the footage that we that we obtained. 314 00:23:21.279 --> 00:23:26.200 Wow, great. In the previous conversation that we had, you mentioned that 315 00:23:26.240 --> 00:23:32.640 you don't plan on stopping utilizing this tool. I think the term Evergreen, 316 00:23:32.680 --> 00:23:36.759 the content is evergreen. Before we close, if you could just touch on 317 00:23:36.839 --> 00:23:40.839 that? Sure. Um. I think it was really important for us, 318 00:23:40.880 --> 00:23:44.960 regardless of when these students ultimately graduate, right. Um, it was really 319 00:23:45.039 --> 00:23:48.039 important for us, when defining the segments, to hit on, you know, 320 00:23:48.759 --> 00:23:55.000 what is and will remain really important for our prospective student families to know 321 00:23:55.400 --> 00:24:00.519 about Dour Valley University. Um. and honestly, you know, I have 322 00:24:00.640 --> 00:24:04.039 visions of of doing more and building on this. Right, Um, we're 323 00:24:04.079 --> 00:24:08.240 going to continue to incorporate and fully integrate it. Obviously it's going to morph 324 00:24:08.279 --> 00:24:12.880 and change over the years, Um, but these students again, their stories. 325 00:24:14.559 --> 00:24:18.359 That is what prospective students and their families want to hear. that. 326 00:24:18.359 --> 00:24:22.519 That is it, Um. You know, I have big ideas about doing 327 00:24:22.680 --> 00:24:26.400 outcomes, right, visiting with these students that were in the segments after graduation. 328 00:24:26.519 --> 00:24:30.680 Where are you now? What's going on? Um? Kathy and I 329 00:24:30.759 --> 00:24:36.400 had a fantastic conversation just yesterday about well, we sort of have a different 330 00:24:36.440 --> 00:24:40.400 toolkit now having gone through this process. Right. What can we do in 331 00:24:40.519 --> 00:24:45.079 house? Um, how can we change the way that we are creating our 332 00:24:45.359 --> 00:24:49.000 new and additional collateral, sort of using that as as the guard rails for 333 00:24:49.119 --> 00:24:55.759 us Um, getting back to again those student voices and driving at home. 334 00:24:56.319 --> 00:24:59.720 Um, I think has been a huge game changer for us and I don't 335 00:24:59.720 --> 00:25:06.000 plan to stop that. I need great thank you for sharing u. As 336 00:25:06.039 --> 00:25:07.920 we bring the episode to a close, would like to ask you if you 337 00:25:08.000 --> 00:25:12.960 have either a final thought or maybe a piece of advice that you could offer 338 00:25:14.119 --> 00:25:18.759 to others that you've learned from this experience, that they don't have to have 339 00:25:18.920 --> 00:25:22.880 had the college tour on their campus, but you know that they could benefit 340 00:25:23.000 --> 00:25:30.240 from doing well. I think what we've already talked about here. My biggest 341 00:25:30.240 --> 00:25:33.759 piece of advice was let your students tell your story. You know you and 342 00:25:33.799 --> 00:25:37.279 you don't have to bring in a Hollywood crew to do that. It's great 343 00:25:37.319 --> 00:25:41.039 if you can, but you can still have your students tell your story. 344 00:25:41.039 --> 00:25:45.000 They're they're the best ambassadors that you're going to have and they're the ones who 345 00:25:45.039 --> 00:25:49.960 can really explain what it's like to be a student on your campus, Um 346 00:25:51.480 --> 00:25:55.200 and and share that with prospective students. So that's that's what I would recommend. 347 00:25:55.279 --> 00:25:59.359 Yeah, and I think Um, certainly we started this by saying what 348 00:25:59.440 --> 00:26:03.160 a great part ownership that the Kathy's have. Um, but I think that 349 00:26:03.160 --> 00:26:07.599 that's hugely important. Um. You know, operating in silos serves no one. 350 00:26:07.279 --> 00:26:11.119 Um, integrating on all fronts. I think there's halo effects to be 351 00:26:11.200 --> 00:26:15.200 gleaned. Um. You know, we talked a little bit about development. 352 00:26:15.240 --> 00:26:19.920 We talked about enrollment management, Um, brand reputation, Um, the the 353 00:26:19.960 --> 00:26:26.680 importance of that relationship cannot be overstated. So, Um, I'm very lucky 354 00:26:26.720 --> 00:26:30.319 and blessed to have Kathy as a partner to do that. Right back catch 355 00:26:30.400 --> 00:26:34.759 up. Thanks. What a great way to what a great way to end 356 00:26:34.759 --> 00:26:41.279 our episode. For anyone that would like to reach out and ask you questions 357 00:26:41.279 --> 00:26:44.519 about what we've talked about today, what would be the best way for them 358 00:26:44.519 --> 00:26:48.359 to contact you? I'll give you my email. Um, Kathy K A 359 00:26:48.440 --> 00:26:52.319 T H Y DOT PAYNE P A Y N E at Del Val Dot Etu, 360 00:26:53.960 --> 00:26:59.839 and the other Cathy K a t h y dot Howell, h o 361 00:27:00.119 --> 00:27:04.079 w e L L at Del Bell Dot e d U. Thank you both 362 00:27:04.160 --> 00:27:11.039 for giving us your time and your wisdom. Bart, what would your final 363 00:27:11.079 --> 00:27:15.000 thoughts be before we close? Yes, thank you both for being on the 364 00:27:15.000 --> 00:27:18.279 episode. This is just this is such a great episode and I would encourage 365 00:27:18.319 --> 00:27:22.559 people that are listening to go ahead and rewind it and listen it again because, 366 00:27:22.559 --> 00:27:23.960 I mean, there's some things that I think that are very critical that 367 00:27:25.000 --> 00:27:26.519 I made a couple of notes as we were listening and, you know, 368 00:27:26.599 --> 00:27:30.599 even starting at the very top, the importance. I mean, if all 369 00:27:30.640 --> 00:27:33.160 we talked about was just how to create differentiation for your institution so that you 370 00:27:33.200 --> 00:27:37.200 could articulate that and create brand around that, the idea of you know, 371 00:27:37.440 --> 00:27:41.759 naming and claiming that E. three sixty and being able to articulate it as 372 00:27:41.759 --> 00:27:44.240 well as you do, that could have been an episode in in and itself, 373 00:27:44.279 --> 00:27:45.759 and so that's such an important part to kind of think about and to 374 00:27:47.119 --> 00:27:49.359 look at and I think that we we we glossed over. It was only 375 00:27:49.359 --> 00:27:52.680 probably twenty seconds of this entire episode. Was the idea of you took the 376 00:27:52.680 --> 00:27:59.200 time to actually upgrade your crm and Um, the idea of, you know, 377 00:27:59.519 --> 00:28:03.519 Autumn eight things so that you can relate Um. So many schools, 378 00:28:03.759 --> 00:28:07.720 especially enrollment management, we end up pushing so much paper, we end up 379 00:28:07.759 --> 00:28:10.079 just kind of checking boxes. You know, I, yes, I made 380 00:28:10.079 --> 00:28:15.279 those fifty voicemail calls, but the idea that you're actually spending time in those 381 00:28:15.279 --> 00:28:18.920 relationships and building those that trust that's so critical, and having a crm that 382 00:28:18.960 --> 00:28:23.039 can do a lot of that automation is is critical and again, could have 383 00:28:23.079 --> 00:28:26.880 been another whole episode just on that. But also I think that the I'm 384 00:28:26.920 --> 00:28:32.240 sorry, Kathy, you're gonna say them Um, but I think that the 385 00:28:32.279 --> 00:28:33.720 idea to just to kind of get back to kind of what the core of 386 00:28:33.759 --> 00:28:37.240 this episode was about, was this idea that you're not going to be able 387 00:28:37.240 --> 00:28:41.400 to have every campus. Cannot have the college tour in a Hollywood crew come 388 00:28:41.400 --> 00:28:45.680 on and do what they did. But I think that you heard in this 389 00:28:45.759 --> 00:28:48.920 episode, there's basically a recipe that they're using. That is that as that 390 00:28:49.079 --> 00:28:55.880 success, it's hearing the students speak, helping them tell that story and and 391 00:28:56.039 --> 00:28:59.799 utilizing the things that they're saying in the way they're saying it in your marketing 392 00:28:59.839 --> 00:29:02.920 to really kind of amplify that out and I think that that's, you know, 393 00:29:03.000 --> 00:29:04.839 one of the ways that again, look at the script, look at 394 00:29:04.839 --> 00:29:07.640 the recipe, follow the recipe and apply it to your own school. I 395 00:29:07.640 --> 00:29:11.039 mean again, you might have a small school. I know there's several colleges 396 00:29:11.119 --> 00:29:14.319 that that I work with that are very small, you know, under five 397 00:29:14.680 --> 00:29:18.200 students. There are a lot of things in this episode that you can do, 398 00:29:18.240 --> 00:29:22.000 that you can learn and it's it's getting giving voice to your students and 399 00:29:22.000 --> 00:29:25.160 that's going to be able to create some of that Evergreen continent and I'm really, 400 00:29:25.640 --> 00:29:27.799 really excited about that. And and and again. We've talked on a 401 00:29:27.839 --> 00:29:32.480 couple other episodes, troy. I remember the episode we had with University of 402 00:29:32.519 --> 00:29:37.440 Kentucky about the importance of the partnership between enrollment and marketing. I can't overestimate 403 00:29:37.480 --> 00:29:41.559 that or over over state that, I should say, in the sense that 404 00:29:41.599 --> 00:29:44.759 you can see in this episode and see the success of the numbers that that 405 00:29:44.960 --> 00:29:48.920 have been talked about in this episode, of just how critical it is that 406 00:29:48.759 --> 00:29:55.000 enrollment and marketing work hand and Glove and and work out success get rid of 407 00:29:55.000 --> 00:29:57.319 the silos. Life is too short, there's too much on the line and 408 00:29:57.440 --> 00:30:00.480 and we've just got to roll up our sleeve and lean into this together. 409 00:30:00.559 --> 00:30:07.319 So excellent episode, so so excited about everything you guys are doing and just 410 00:30:07.720 --> 00:30:11.839 congratulations. You've earned it. Thank you so much. This episode of the 411 00:30:11.960 --> 00:30:18.920 Higher Ed Marketer podcast is majorly sponsored by Zemi, where students share stories and 412 00:30:18.960 --> 00:30:26.440 connect in exclusive college communities, also by Kaylor solutions and education marketing and branding 413 00:30:26.480 --> 00:30:33.559 agency and, I think, patented a marketing execution company combining print customization and 414 00:30:33.680 --> 00:30:37.559 technology for deeper engagement. On behalf of my co host, Bart Kaylor, 415 00:30:37.799 --> 00:30:44.680 I'm troy singer. Thank you so much for listening. You've been listening to 416 00:30:44.720 --> 00:30:48.119 the Higher Ed Marketer. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe 417 00:30:48.160 --> 00:30:52.759 to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you're listening with apple podcasts. 418 00:30:53.039 --> 00:30:56.319 We'd love for you to leave a quick rating of the show. Simply 419 00:30:56.359 --> 00:31:00.400 tap the number of stars do you think the podcast deserves. Until next time,